Historic Sites in the United Kingdom

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The island of Britain has a rich and diverse history that has witnessed the rise and fall of tribes, kingdoms, empires and nations. From stone-age cultures to the Ancient Romans, Norman conquerors to the achievements of the British Empire, the UK’s historic sites are as diverse as they are wondrous.

In fact, historical places make up some of the top attractions in the UK – and some of the most popular tourist sites - from Stonehenge to Westminster Abbey, Roman Bath and Edinburgh Castle. The countless examples of ancient sites, medieval castles and industrial revolution monuments ensure that no visit to Britain goes without its historical highlights.

We’ve put together an experts guide to Heritage Sites in Britain, with our top ten places to visit as well as a full list of UK Historic Sites, which shouldn’t be ignored if you have the time.

What are the best Historic Sites in the United Kingdom?

1. Portchester Castle

Portchester Castle in Hampshire offers a fantastic insight into various periods of British history and originally dates back to the Roman era. Built during Roman times, probably in the third century AD, Portchester Castle is the country’s only example of a Roman fort whose walls still stand complete up to around six metres.

Today, Portchester Castle is run by English Heritage who offer audio tours and exhibitions about the site as well as children’s activities.

2. Blenheim Palace

Blenheim Palace was built as a gift to the Duke of Marlborough following his victory over French forces at the Battle of Blenheim in 1704. On 30 November 1874, it also became the birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill, one of Britain’s greatest leaders. Today it is home to the 12th Duke and Duchess of Marlborough.

Whether you choose to wander Blenheim Palace independently or as part of a guided tour, you can enjoy endless artistic masterpieces such as the Blenheim Tapestry depicting Lord Marlborough accepting the surrender of the French and the stunning ceiling paintings of Louis Laguerre. The 18th century house itself is an architectural marvel in its own right with its Baroque design.

3. Portsmouth Historic Dockyard

Portsmouth Historic Dockyard contains three of the Britain’s most famous warships, namely the HMS Victory, HMS Warrior and Mary Rose. Also housing the Royal Navy Museum and still part of an active naval base, Portsmouth Historic Dockyard offers visitors a great insight into the British navy, both its past and present.

Visitors can also explore the Royal Navy Museum, one of the Britain’s foremost maritime museums and the only one to focus on the navy’s ships and serving members.

4. Roman Baths - Bath

First discovered in the nineteenth century, the Roman Baths are one of the best preserved ancient Roman sites in the UK and form a major tourist attraction. The baths offer an incredibly comprehensive insight into the lives of the ancient Romans in the town and around Britain. The site looks quite small from the outside, but it is actually vast and a visit can last several hours. 

Amongst the other sites at the Roman Baths, there is a comprehensive museum dedicated to exploring the lives of the ancient Roman citizens of Bath and an ancient drain used as an overflow system. Around the Great Bath itself, visitors can explore the numerous saunas, swimming pools, heated baths and changing facilities at the site.


Audio tours, available in English, Spanish, German, French, Italian, Dutch, Japanese and Mandarin and are included in the ticket price or visitors can join one of the hourly guided tours. The audio tour includes sections by the famous author Bill Bryson, and there are also children’s audio guides.

5. Caernarfon Castle

Caernarfon Castle is a stunning medieval stronghold in Wales built by Edward I and listed by UNESCO. Caernarfon has fared very well through the centuries, remaining exceptionally intact. It has also continued to play host to important events, including the investiture of Prince Charles as the Prince of Wales in 1969. Today, the site offers exhibits and tours.

6. Highgate Cemetery

Highgate Cemetery is a graveyard in London where the famous philosopher and political economist Karl Marx is buried. It is also the burial site of several other prominent people, including several novelists, artists, political activists and professionals. A list of famous internments can be found on Highgate Cemetery’s website.

Guided tours of the East Cemetery, where Marx is interned, take place on the first Saturday of each month starting at 2:15pm and last around an hour.

7. Ironbridge Gorge

One of the most significant historic attractions in Britain, Ironbridge Gorge is an icon of the industrial revolution and a World Heritage site. Today, visitors can immerse themselves in this fascinating period of history. Not only can they see the bridge itself, but also a variety of other sites including homes, factories, mines, warehouses, foundries and the infrastructure of the 18th century Ironbridge Gorge.

There are ten Ironbridge Gorge museums, each telling a different aspect of the area’s story. From exploring the world of a Victorian town at Blists Hill and the Coalport China Museum to the Jackfield Tile Museum and the Tar tunnel, there’s lots to see.

8. Corfe Castle

Corfe Castle is the stunning ruin of a castle which has been everything from a royal residence to a military stronghold and even a prison. Today the site is one of the UK's most picturesque historical places.

The current incarnation of Corfe Castle was built by William the Conqueror in around 1066, although even before this, the site was of great historical importance, Indeed, it is said that King Edward the Martyr was murdered here in a plot to position Ethelred "the Unready" as monarch.

Corfe Castle would be expanded and altered over the coming centuries, especially in the 12th to 13th centuries under King John. Not only did this monarch further fortify the castle, he also used it as a prison and even a home. The demise of Corfe Castle and the cause of its current ruined state came with the English Civil War. Having survived one siege in 1643, it would fall to another only three years later, then being demolished by the Parliamentarians.

Today, Corfe Castle is open to the public under the remit of the National Trust.

9. Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle is a medieval fortress and royal castle turned national monument and World Heritage site. It is one of the top attractions in the United Kingdom.

Known by its English name since the invasion of the Angles in 638AD, the first mentions of Edinburgh Castle occurred in 600 AD during Roman Britain, when it was called “Din Eidyn” or “the fortress of Eidyn”.

It initially became a royal castle in the Middle Ages and has since been the site of many significant events in royal and military history. As a royal residence, Edinburgh Castle was the site of the birth of King James VI, also James I of England from 1603, to Mary Queen of Scots in 1566. However, Edinburgh Castle’s main role was a military fortification.

From as early as the thirteenth century, the castle was a focal point of the war between England and Scotland, swapping hands numerous times in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. By this time, much of the original castle had been destroyed, to be rebuilt under the order of David II, who later died here in 1371. However, the buildings of Edinburgh Castle were to suffer further destruction in battle and David’s Tower, which was built in honour of David II, was razed during the Lang Siege. The final siege at Edinburgh Castle would take place in 1745, carried out by the Jacobites.

Today, visitors to Edinburgh Castle can explore the castle’s history through a series of guided tours and exhibitions. Among its many attractions are the Scottish National War Memorial and National War Museum, the Mons Meg, a giant cannon gifted to James II in 1457 and the Great Hall, built by James VI in 1511. Royal exhibitions include The Honours of Scotland jewels which, along with Scotland’s coronation stone, the Stone of Destiny, can be found in the castle’s Crown Room. Edinburgh Castle is also home to the oldest building in the city, the 12th-century St Margaret’s Chapel.

10. Durham Castle

Durham Castle is an eleventh century building and the former home of the Bishops of Durham.

Originally commissioned by William the Conqueror in 1072, Durham Castle was intended to ensure Norman control in the North of England. Once under Church control, each bishop, on his appointment, would put his own stamp on the castle, and duly altered it to reflect his own glory.

However, despite the many changes, Durham Castle retains the layout of a Norman motte and bailey castle. It has a well preserved Norman chapel, dating from 1080, and many other features of interest.

Durham Castle is now a residential college for the University of Durham, but is open to visitors on guided tours.

Full list of Historic Sites in the United Kingdom

Beyond the most famous Heritage Sites in Britain, there’s many similar places to visit, including HMS Belfast, Corfe Castle and Ironbridge Gorge to name but a few. We’re constantly expanding this list of Historic Sites in the United Kingdom and you can view the current selection below.

10 Downing Street

10 Downing Street is the home of the Prime Minister of the UK....

39 Bridge Street, Chester

39 Bridge Street is a building in Chester, Cheshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building, its major archaeological feature being the remains of a Roman hypocaust in its cellar.The building has four storeys, with a shop at street level and a portion of Chester Rows in the storey above. The hypocaust in the cellar dates to the 2nd century during the Roman occupation of Chester. In the late 13th or early 14th century a medieval undercroft was built adjacent to the hypocaust, with a house above. In 1864 a new floor was inserted at street level and a shop front was added in the 20th century. The ground floor is now used as a café. The remains of the hypocaust were found during the reconstruction of the property in 1864. They consist of 27 square columns in a rectangular chamber which originally contained 32 columns in eight rows of four.

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A La Ronde

A La Ronde is a sixteen-sided 18th century historic house located in Devon and operated by the National Trust.

Abbey House Museum

A living history museum, Abbey House recreates authentic Victorian streets to reflect 19th century life.

Acton Burnell Castle

The picturesque Acton Burnell Castle is a ruined English fortified Manor near Shrewsbury.

Aesica Roman Fort

Aesica was one of several Roman Forts build along the line of Hadrian’s Wall. It is thought to have been constructed in the early 2nd century.

Alberbury Castle

Alberbury Castle is in the village of Alberbury, some nine miles north-west of Shrewsbury, Shropshire and very close to the border with Wales. The building has been constructed from locally available red sandstone. It is a Grade II listed building.Its origins are uncertain but it was probably built in the 13th century by Fulk FitzWarin during the reign of Richard I.

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Aldborough Roman Site

Aldborough was originally the capital and stronghold of the Brigantes, who controlled vast swathes of Northern England, before becoming Romanised in the first century AD.

All Hallows by the Tower

One of the oldest churches in London, All Hallows by the Tower contains Roman and Saxon remains as well as other interesting elements.

All Souls Church

Built by John Nash and consecrated in 1824, All Souls Church is a conservative evangelical Anglican church at the north end of Regent Street, one of London’s most famous thoroughfares.

Alnwick Castle

Ever wanted to head to Hogwarts? Why not visit Alnwick Castle? This historic site in Northumberland is home to the Harry Potter Franchise and is one of the largest castles in England.

Althorp House and Estate

Althorp is a country house and estate which has been home to the Spencer dynasty - family of Princess Diana - for over 500 years.

Ambleside Roman Fort

The remains of Ambleside Roman Fort date from the 2nd century and are located on the shores of Lake Windermere.

Anglesey Abbey

Anglesey Abbey is a Jacobean-style mansion in Cambridgeshire, built on the site of a medieval priory and now boasting unique cultural collections, impressive gardens and a fully functioning water mill.

Anne of Cleves House

This historic Tudor house in Lewes was once the property of Anne of Cleves and highlights the history of Tudors England.

Apley Castle

Apley Castle was a medieval fortified manor in the village of Hadley, Shropshire, England.

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Apsley House

Apsley House was the home of one of Britain’s most heroic figures, the Duke of Wellington.

Aquae Arnemetiae

Aquae Arnemetiae was a small town in the Roman province of Britannia. The settlement was based around its natural warm springs. Today it is the town of Buxton, Derbyshire in England.

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Arbeia Roman Fort

Arbeia Roman Fort was one of the wall forts of Hadrian’s Wall and served as a military supply base for the other encampments.

Ardoch Roman Fort

Ardoch Roman Fort contains the well preserved earthworks of a Roman fort in Scotland, with ditches up to six foot high.

Ardotalia

Ardotalia (also known as Melandra, or Melandra Castle) is a Roman fort in Gamesley, near Glossop in Derbyshire, England.

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Arthur’s Stone

Arthur’s Stone is a mysterious burial chamber in Herefordshire.

Arundel Castle

Originally built in the 11th Century, Arundel Castle is the historic home of the Dukes of Norfolk and has been continually occupied and renovated over the centuries.

Ashby Castle

Ashby Castle was a Royalist stronghold during the English Civil War.

Ashmolean Museum

The Ashmolean Museum is a museum of the University of Oxford specialising in art and archaeology.

Aston Hall

Aston Hall is an imposing Jacobean mansion house in Birmingham, which now operates as a museum.

Avebury Ring

Avebury Ring is a vast Neolithic stone circle, probably the largest in the world, and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Balkerne Gate

Balkerne Gate is a 1st-century Roman gateway in Colchester. It is the largest surviving gateway in Roman Britain and was built where the Roman road from Londinium intersected the town wall. It is a Grade I listed building.

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Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle has been the official Highlands home of the British royal family since the reign of Queen Victoria.

Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle is a grand structure which looms high upon a crag overlooking the coast of Northumberland.

Bannockburn Battlefield

Bannockburn Battlefield was the site where Scottish leader Robert the Bruce defeated the English, repelling their attempts to control Scotland and once again affirming its sovereignty.

Banqueting House

The Banqueting House in Whitehall is famous as the site of the execution of King Charles I.

Bar Hill Fort

Bar Hill Fort was one of the Roman forts along The Antonine Wall.

Barley Hall

Barley Hall is a Town House in the middle of York, reflecting the lives of a wealthy family at the end of the 15th Century.

Barnard Castle

Barnard Castle contains the ruins of a Norman stronghold which was later owned by Richard III.

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey was built from the late fifteenth century, destroyed by Henry VIII and restored under Elizabeth I.

Battle Abbey and Battlefield

Battle Abbey and Battlefield is an iconic site in England, being the location of the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

Battle of Barnet

One of the most decisive and bloody encounters of the Wars of the Roses.

Battle of Britain Monument

Unveiled by Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall in September 2005 on the Victoria Embankment, the Battle of Britain Monument by sculptor Paul Day is dedicated to everyone – airmen, support personnel and civilians – who took part in one of the most famous battles in the history of warfare.

Battle of Drumclog

The Battle of Drumclog was fought on June 1st, 1679 at Drumclog in South Lanarkshire between the army of John Graham of Claverhouse and a group of Covenanters.

Battle of Ludford Bridge

The Battle of Ludford Bridge marked an early set-back for the Yorkist forces in the Wars of the Roses.

Battle of Mortimer’s Cross

Wars of the Roses batlle, leading to the death of Owen Tudor.

Battle of Northampton

The Battle of Northampton was a battle in the Wars of the Roses and a major victory for the Yorkists.

Battle of Tewkesbury

A definitive battle of the Wars of the Roses, Tewkesbury was a resounding defeat for the Lancastrians, and led to fourteen years of peace from May 1471.

Battledykes

Battledykes is a Roman Camp established slightly to the north of Forfar, Scotland. According to Hector Boece, Pictish chiefs met at a castle by Forfar Loch to plan how to repel the Roman armies, who invaded several times between the 1st and 4th centuries AD. Eventually, the better equipped Romans prevailed, to be displaced again by the Picts. The Romans established a Roman Camp at Battledykes, approximately three miles north of Forfar; this camp was assessed to have held 50,000 to 60,000 men. From Battledykes northward the Romans established a succession of camps including Stracathro, Raedykes and Normandykes.

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Bayham Old Abbey

Bayham Old Abbey was a medieval monastery dissolved by King Henry VIII.

Beamish Museum

An open air, living museum, Beamish recreates what life was like in the industrial age of Victorian and Edwardian Britain.

Beamish Museum

A living, open air museum in County Durham with loads to do for the whole family, the Beamish Museum recreates what life was like in the industrial age of Victorian and Edwardian Britain.

Bearsden Bath House

The Bearsden Bath House was a Roman bath complex which would have served a fort of The Antonine Wall.

Beaulieu Abbey

Beaulieu Abbey is an early 13th century historic monastic complex, partially destroyed in the reign of Henry VIII during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The site is home to the National Motor Museum.

Beaumaris Castle

Beaumaris Castle was to be the largest of King Edward’s iron ring of castles intended to encircle Wales.

Bede’s World

An interactive and living history museum, Bede's World tells the story of Anglo-Saxon life in Northumbria and the life of famous Anglo-Saxon writer Bede.

Bedford Square, Bloomsbury

The finest and most complete Georgian development in London, Bedford Square was laid out between 1775 and 1780, most likely by architect Thomas Leverton.

Belas Knap Long Barrow

The Belas Knap Long Barrow is a well-preserved example of a Neolithic burial chamber located near Cheltenham.

Belton House

Belton House is a 17th century historic house in Lincolnshire which is now a popular visitor attraction.

Benjamin Franklin House

Benjamin Franklin House in London is the only surviving former residence of Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

Berkeley Castle

Berkeley Castle was originally built nearly 1,000 years ago, but since then has undergone a number of changes and has been the site of many interesting – and sometimes bloody – events.

Berkhamsted Castle

Berkhamsted Castle was a medieval stronghold, the ruins of which lie in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire.

Bertha (Perth)

Bertha was a Roman fortress north of the site of modern Perth, Scotland, at the confluence of the rivers Almond and Tay. It is half a mile east of the modern farm of "Berthapark" and is a scheduled ancient monument.One source contradicts the view that Perth was a corruption of the fort's name. According to this source, the name "Bertha" was originally used by medieval Scots historians, such as John of Fordun and Walter Bower, who did not know the original name for the site and who adapted a version of "Perth" - "Berth". The Romans probably called the site "Tamia", after a native name for the River Tay. In early medieval times the abandoned site was still used for ceremonial purposes by Pictish and Gaelic kings, when it was called "Rathinveramon".The fort was a supply base built around AD83 to support the occasional Roman expeditions into north-east Scotland. At that time, it was at the highest navigable point on the Tay. It's thought possible that the site was re-used on three occasions up to the 3rd centuryThe 9-acre (36,000 m2) site was identified in the 18th century. It has been damaged by river erosion and by ploughing, but excavations in 1973 revealed a ditch 11 feet (3.4 m) wide and 5.5 feet (1.7 m) deep. Immediately within the ditch was a wide berm over 30 feet (9.1 m) wide and this was backed by a turf rampart averaging about 21 feet (6.4 m) wide.

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Berwick Castle

Berwick Castle was a medieval castle, the ruins of which are located in Berwick-Upon-Tweed, Northumberland.

Big Ben

Big Ben is the name often attributed to the iconic clock tower of the Houses of Parliament.

Big Pit National Coal Museum

The Big Pit National Coal Museum in Wales tells the story of the British coal industry.

Bignor Roman Villa

Bignor Roman Villa is a large Roman villa site on the Bignor estate and contains some of the best preserved Roman mosaics in Britain.

Binchester Roman Fort

Binchester Roman Fort contains the remains of one of the largest Roman fortifications in northern Britain.

Birdoswald Roman Fort

Birdoswald Roman Fort is one of the best preserved of the wall forts of Hadrian’s Wall.

Bishop's Waltham Palace

The ruins of the medieval Bishop’s Waltham Palace can be seen in Hampshire.

Blatobulgium

Blatobulgium was a Roman fort, located at the modern-day site known as Birrens, in Dumfriesshire, Scotland.

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Bletchley Park

Bletchley Park was Station X, the central location of British code cracking operations during World War II.

Blore Heath

Blore Heath was the site of the second battle of what became known as the Wars of the Roses.

Bo'ness

Borrowstounness (commonly known as Bo'ness ( boh-NESS)) is a town and former burgh and seaport on the south bank of the Firth of Forth in the Central Lowlands of Scotland. Historically part of the county of West Lothian, it is within the Falkirk council area, 16.9 miles (27.2 km) north-west of Edinburgh and 6.7 miles (10.8 km) east of Falkirk. At the 2011 United Kingdom census, the population of the Bo'ness Locality was 15,100.

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Bodiam Castle

Perhaps one of England’s best known moated castles, Bodiam Castle was built in 1385. The castle suffered during the English Civil War and was restored before being bequeathed to the National Trust. It now ranks among the most beautiful castles in the world.

Bokerley Dyke

Bokerley Dyke (or Bokerley Ditch) is a Romano-British defensive dyke 3.25 miles (5.2 km) long in north east Dorset, England, near the villages of Woodyates and Pentridge. It is also spelt Bokerly Dyke.Bokerley Dyke was excavated by Augustus Pitt Rivers between 1888 and 1891 and by Philip Rahtz in advance of road widening in 1958. Bokerley Dyke may have originated in the Bronze Age or Early Iron Age and formed a political and cultural boundary. It was cut through by a Roman Road (Ackling Dyke running between Old Sarum and Badbury Rings) in the 1st century.In the 4th century it was remodelled and brought back into use, and excavations show that the Roman road was blocked. A coin of Valens dates this activity to shortly after 364 AD. It may have been built in 367-8 AD when Roman sources report that Britain was attacked by Picts, Scots and Saxons in a supposed Great Conspiracy. The Roman road was later reopened, but the dyke may have continued in use after the cessation of the Roman rule and still forms part of a boundary between the counties of Dorset and Hampshire.Bokerley Dyke is continuous with Grim's Ditch which runs into Hampshire.

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Bolsover Castle

Bolsover Castle was once the site of a medieval fortress before its replacement with an ornate 17th century manor house modelled on a small castle. Now run by English Heritage.

Bosworth Field - Actual Site

The Battle of Bosworth Field of 1485 resulted in the death of King Richard III and ascension of Henry VII to the throne.

Bosworth Field Visitor Centre

The Bosworth Field Visitor Centre is a good starting point for exploring the site of this famous clash from Wars of the Roses.

Bothwell Castle

Bothwell Castle is a ruined medieval stronghold near Glasgow which played a role in the Wars of Independence.

Bothwellhaugh Roman Fort

Bothwellhaugh Roman Fort is the site of a Roman fort, now located within Strathclyde Country Park in North Lanarkshire, Scotland. It is east of where the South Calder Water flows into Strathclyde Loch. The fort is a scheduled monument.

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Boudica & Her Daughters, Westminster Bridge

One of London’s most iconic statues is also one of its most ironic. Celebrated in the centre of the city she destroyed is Boudica, queen of the Celtic Iceni tribe who led her people against the occupying Romans.

Boughton House

Boughton House is a French-influenced 17th-century English country house which is now periodically open to visitors.

Bourn Castle

Bourn Castle was in the village of Bourn in Cambridgeshire, 10 miles to the west of Cambridge (grid reference TL322562).

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Brading Roman Villa

Brading Roman Villa was a first to second century Ancient Roman farm on the Isle of Wight.

Branodunum Fort

Branodunum Fort is a 3rd century Roman fort located on the Norfolk coast.

Bremenium Roman Fort

Bremenium Roman Fort was an important Roman outpost and garrison located beyond the major fortifications of Hadrian’s Wall, near modern-day Rochester in Northumberland.

Bridgnorth Castle

Bridgnorth Castle is a castle in the town of Bridgnorth, Shropshire.

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British Museum

The British Museum in London is a world-famous museum of history and culture.

Brontë Parsonage Museum

Dedicated to the Bronte sisters and run by one of the oldest literary societies in the world, the Bronte Parsonage Museum in West Yorkshire is the perfect day out for anyone interested in Classical English literature.

Brough of Birsay

The Brough of Birsay is an uninhabited tidal island off the north-west coast of The Mainland of Orkney, Scotland, in the parish of Birsay. It is located around 13 miles north of Stromness and features the remains of Pictish and Norse settlements as well as a modern light house.

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Broughton Castle

Situated on the border of Oxfordshire, Broughton Castle is surrounded by a three acre moat, and set amongst the scenic parkland of Broughton park.

Broxmouth Park

Broxmouth Park is the site of the 1650 Battle of Dunbar, where Oliver Cromwell led his troops to victory over a Scottish Royalist army.

Bryn Amlwg Castle

Bryn Amlwg Castle (Welsh: Castell Bryn Amlwg) is in Shropshire near the Welsh border and the hamlet of Anchor which lies between Newtown and Clun.

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Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace has been the royal residence of British monarchs since the reign of Queen Victoria.

Bucknowle Farm

Bucknowle Farm is the site of a Romano-British settlement and a Roman villa, located one kilometre southeast of Church Knowle and one kilometre southwest of Corfe Castle village in Dorset, England (grid reference SY95368146). It is about seven kilometres south of Wareham and approximately nine kilometres west of Swanage in the heart of the Isle of Purbeck.

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Burgh Castle Roman Fort

The Roman Fort at Burgh Castle is one of the best preserved Roman sites in Britain. The walls of this impressive fortification remain in remarkably good condition - they survive on three sides and stretch as high as four metres.

Burwell Castle

Burwell Castle was an unfinished medieval enclosure castle in Burwell, Cambridgeshire, England.

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Bushey Museum

A small museum dedicated to the local history of the village of Bushey in Hertfordshire, which also contains an art gallery.

Byland Abbey

Byland Abbey was a prominent twelfth century monastery which now lies as a pretty ruin in Yorkshire.

Cabinet War Rooms

The Cabinet War Rooms are part of the underground bunker complex in London where Winston Churchill and his government operated during World War Two.

Cadder

Cadder (Scottish Gaelic: Coile Dobhair) is a district of the town of Bishopbriggs, East Dunbartonshire, Scotland. It is located 7 km north of Glasgow city centre, 0.5 km south of the River Kelvin, and approximately 1.5 km north-east of Bishopbriggs town centre, sited on the route of the Forth and Clyde Canal. There is a Glasgow council housing scheme of a similar name, generally pronounced Cawder, in the district of Lambhill some 3 miles (5 km) to the south-west along the Canal, which was built in the early 1950s. Similarly, within Cadder, there is Cawder Golf Club, which also uses that original pronunciation.

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Caer Gybi

Caer Gybi hosts the remains of a small Roman fort and naval base which formed part of the local Roman defences of the area in the latter Roman Empire period.

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Caerlaverock Castle

Set in truly jaw-dropping Scottish countryside, Caerlaverock Castle was an important fortification, providing defence for the Scottish crown in a period of deep rooted rivalry with England.

Caerleon Roman Fortress

Caerleon Roman Fortress is home to what is said to be Europe’s only viewable Roman Legionary Barracks.

Caerphilly Castle

Caerphilly Castle is a vast thirteenth century Anglo-Norman stronghold built to defend against Welsh prince Llywelyn ap Gruffudd.

Caerwent Roman Town

Caerwent Roman Town is home to the ruins of the once thriving Roman settlement of Venta Silurum.

Callanish Stones

The Callanish Stones are a collection of Neolothic standing stones on the west coast of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides.

Camas Uig

Camas Uig (Uig Bay) is a bay on the west coast of the Isle of Lewis, in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. The Lewis Chessmen were discovered in the dunes behind the beach.

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Camber Castle

Camber Castle is a vast sixteenth century fortification built by Henry VIII.

Cambridge Castle

Cambridge Castle, locally also known as Castle Mound, is located in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England. Originally built after the Norman conquest to control the strategically important route to the north of England, it played a role in the conflicts of the Anarchy, the First and Second Barons' Wars. Hugely expanded by Edward I, the castle then fell rapidly into disuse in the late medieval era, its stonework recycled for building purposes in the surrounding colleges. Cambridge Castle was refortified during the English Civil War but once again fell into disuse, used primarily as the county gaol. The castle gaol was finally demolished in 1842, with a new prison built in the castle bailey. This prison was demolished in 1932, replaced with the modern Shire Hall, and only the castle motte and limited earthworks still stand. The site is open to the public daily and offers views over the historic buildings of the city.

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Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

A museum that contains a variety of different artefacts from history, ranging from African and Native American art to Roman discoveries and world collections. A wonderful place to visit for those who have an active interest in anthropology and archaeology.

Camelon

Camelon (; Scots: Caimlan, Scottish Gaelic: Camlann) is a large settlement within the Falkirk council area, Scotland. The village is in the Forth Valley, 1.3 miles (2.1 km) west of Falkirk, 1.3 miles (2.1 km) south of Larbert and 2.6 miles (4.2 km) east of Bonnybridge. The main road through Camelon is the A803 road which links the village to Falkirk. At the time of the 2001 census, Camelon had a population of 4,508.

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Canons Ashby House

Canons Ashby House is an Elizabethan manor house in Northamptonshire, now run by the National Trust.

Canterbury Cathedral

Canterbury Cathedral has a prominent history dating back to the sixth century AD and was the site of the infamous murder of Thomas Beckett.

Canute's Palace

Canute's Palace in Southampton, England, is the name given to the ruins of a Norman merchant's house dating from the late twelfth century. Despite its name, the building has no connection with Canute the Great, nor was it a palace.

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Cardiff Castle

Cardiff Castle is a medieval complex comprised of a range of styles and with a diverse history dating back to the Romans.

Carpow Roman Fort

The Roman Fort of Carpow was situated at the confluence of the rivers Tay and Earn in what is now Scotland.It was a large fortress with an area of thirty acres occupied by two legions at different times, Legio II Augusta and Legio VI Victrix, and thus of solid, permanent construction using stone, brick and tiles.The fort was occupied from the late second century AD until the early third century AD. The site of the fort has not been comprehensively excavated but it is believed to have served as a naval supply depot for Roman forces in the central lowlands. Its occupation also coincided with the campaigns of Septimius Severus in the area.However, its site on the southern side of the Tay estuary is incompatible with its use as a base for Severan offensive operations to the north and, along with other evidence, it is more likely that the fortress was built under Commodus in 185 to support his campaigns.It has been suggested that the Carpow fort was the place named as "Horrea Classis" or "Poreo Classis" in the Ravenna Cosmography.

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Carrickfergus Castle

Carrickfergus Castle is a Norman-built fortification which was in continual use as a military stronghold for over 700 years. Today a number of exhibitions about the history of the castle and the local area are on show within the castle itself.

Castle Acre Priory

Castle Acre Priory was an eleventh century monastery dissolved by King Henry VIII.

Castle Camps

Castle Camps was a Norman Castle located in what is now the civil parish of Castle Camps, Cambridgeshire.

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Castle Drogo

Castle Drogo is an early 20th century country home constructed in the style of a mediaeval castle. This impressive building is now owned by the National Trust and open to visitors.

Castle Greg

Castle Greg is the archaeological remains of a Roman fortlet near Camilty Plantation, approximately three miles south-east of West Calder, West Lothian, in Scotland.

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Castle Howard

This impressive stately home nestled in Yorkshire has been the home of the Howard family since its construction in 1699.

Castle Keep

Castle Keep in Newcastle upon Tyne is one of the city’s most famous attractions and one of the best preserved Norman fortifications in the country.

Castle Rising

Castle Rising is a ruined Norman fortification in Norfolk which was once home to Queen Isabella, widow of Edward II and mother of Edward III.

Castle Ward

Castle Ward is an eccentric 18th century mansion overlooking Strangford Lough in County Down, Northern Ireland but it is better known to Game of Thrones fans as Winterfell.

Castlecary

Castlecary () is a small, historic, village in North Lanarkshire, Scotland. It has long been associated with infrastructure, being adjacent to a bridged river, a Roman fort and roads, a nationwide canal, a Victorian railway viaduct, and a modern motorway. Castlecary is close to the town of Cumbernauld but like Dullatur and Luggiebank is not officially part of the town. Around 1725, the barony of Castlecary, with a population of just seventeen families, was disjoined from the parish of Falkirk, and annexed to Cumbernauld quoad sacra. Castlecary is also near Allandale which, though in the Falkirk council area, was built for Castlecary fireclay workers.

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Castlehill Fort

Castlehill was a Roman fort on the Antonine Wall in Scotland.

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Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle in Cumbria is a Neolithic Stone Age monument of 38 stones which ranks among the earliest of stone circles found in Britain.

Caus Castle

Caus Castle is a ruin of a hill fort and medieval castle in the civil parish of Westbury in the English county of Shropshire. It is situated up on the eastern foothills of the Long Mountain guarding the route from Shrewsbury, Shropshire to Montgomery, Powys on the border between England and Wales. It was destroyed during the English Civil War and has been in ruins since.

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Cawdor (Roman fort)

Easter Glacantray, an alleged Roman fort), is located near the small village of Cawdor (15 miles east of Inverness). It is alleged to be a Roman fort although there is a lack of archaeological evidence to support this claim.

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Cawthorn Roman Camps

The Cawthorn Roman Camps are the remains of a late 1st / early 2nd century AD Roman military enclosure situated in the south of the North York Moors.

Charlton Castle

Charlton Castle was a fortified manor house situated in Shropshire between Shrewsbury and Telford (grid reference SJ597112).

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Chatsworth House

Chatsworth House is an English country estate that has served as the ancestral home of the Dukes of Devonshire. It was also the one-time prison of Mary Queen of Scots.

Chedworth Roman Villa

Chedworth Roman Villa is a well-preserved Ancient Roman house in the Cotswolds.

Cheney Longville Castle

Cheney Longville Castle was in the village of Cheney Longville to the north of Craven Arms, Shropshire (grid reference SO417847). It is a much restored 14th century fortified manor house.

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Chester Roman Amphitheatre

Chester Roman Amphitheatre is Britain’s largest known Roman amphitheatre.

Chester Roman Gardens

The Chester Roman Gardens are a scenic park complex containing a number of Roman artefacts from the nearby area.

Chesters Roman Fort

Chesters Roman Fort was part of Hadrian’s Wall and is a now a well-preserved archaeological site.

Cheveley Castle

Cheveley Castle was a medieval fortified manor house near Cheveley, Cambridgeshire, England.

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Churchill’s Secret Bunker

Churchill’s Secret Bunker was designed to be used as the nerve centre of the British government during WW2 in the event of Britain being unable to defend itself from air attack.

Chysauster Ancient Village

Chysauster Ancient Village (Cornish: Chisylvester, meaning Sylvester's house) is a late Iron Age and Romano-British village of courtyard houses in Cornwall, United Kingdom, which is currently in the care of English Heritage. The village included eight to ten houses, each with its own internal courtyard. To the south east is the remains of a fogou, an underground structure of uncertain function.

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Chysauster Village

Chysauster Ancient Village contains the ruins of an Iron Age settlement in Cornwall, which is operated by English Heritage.

Cirencester Amphitheatre

Cirencester Amphitheatre was once a Roman theatre, the remnants of which are located in Gloucestershire.

Clarence House

Clarence House has been the London residence of several members of the British royal family.

Cleobury Castle

Cleobury Castle was sited by the River Rea in the small town of Cleobury Mortimer in Shropshire which lies between the towns of Ludlow and Bewdley (grid reference SO681761).

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Clifford’s Tower

Clifford’s Tower is a 13th century castle with a diverse history.

Clifton Rocks Railway

The Clifton Rocks Railway is a former underground funicular railway linking Clifton to Bristol Harbour, which is now open to the public via pre-arranged tours.

Cliveden House

A beautiful 19th country house with vast parkland and gardens, Cliveden has often hosted the country’s political elite and was a key location in the infamous Profumo Affair.

Clun Castle

Clun Castle is a ruined castle in the small town of Clun, Shropshire. Clun Castle was established by the Norman lord Robert de Say after the Norman invasion of England and went on to become an important Marcher lord castle in the 12th century, with an extensive castle-guard system. Owned for many years by the Fitzalan family, Clun played a key part in protecting the region from Welsh attack until it was gradually abandoned as a property in favour of the more luxurious Arundel Castle. The Fitzalans converted Clun Castle into a hunting lodge in the 14th century, complete with pleasure gardens, but by the 16th century the castle was largely ruined. Slighted in 1646 after the English Civil War, Clun remained in poor condition until renovation work in the 1890s.

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Colchester Castle

Colchester Castle is a beautifully preserved Norman stronghold with a rich history dating back to Roman times, having been built on the site of the Temple of Claudius.

Conwy Castle

Conwy Castle was one of a ring of medieval strongholds built by King Edward I.

Corbridge Roman Town

Corbridge Roman Town was a thriving Ancient Roman settlement near Hadrian’s Wall and is now an archaeological site.

Cosmeston Medieval Village

Cosmeston Medieval Village is a recreation of a 14th century Welsh village.

Cragside

Cragside is an historic house and gardens in Northumberland and was the first house in the world to be lit by hydroelectric power.

Craigmillar Castle

Craigmillar Castle played host to Mary Queen of Scots.

Crichton Castle

Crichton Castle is a distinctive fourteenth century castle.

Crofton Roman Villa

Crofton Roman Villa in Orpington, London, contains the remains of an ancient house and farm complex originally built in the second century AD and occupied until around 400AD.

Croy Hill

Croy Hill was the site of one of the Roman forts of The Antonine Wall.

Crumlin Road Gaol

Crumlin Road Gaol in North Belfast is the last remaining Victorian prison in Northern Ireland. Now an award-winning tourist attraction, you’ll hear stories of executions, famous inmates, riots, hunger-strikes, escapes and the gruesome secrets permeating 150 years of prison life in Northern Ireland.

Culloden Battlefield

Culloden Battlefield was the site of the final battle of the Jacobite uprising and resulted in the defeat of the Jacobites by government forces.

Deers Den

Deers Den is an archaeological site at Kintore, Scotland in Aberdeenshire. The site has mesolithic remains, Iron Age artefacts and is a known Roman Camp.

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Denbigh Castle

Denbigh Castle is one of the ring of castles built by King Edward I in order to establish his dominance over Wales.

Denge Sound Mirrors

The Denge Sound Mirrors are fine examples of early attempt at an early warning system.

Derry City Walls

The Derry City Walls are seventeenth century defensive walls and the only complete ones of their kind in Ireland.

Derventio Coritanorum

Derventio was a small town in the Roman province of Britannia. Today the area is known as Little Chester, on the outskirts of Derby, located in the English county of Derbyshire.

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Dewa Roman Experience

Situated on the site of a Roman fort in the historic city of Chester, Dewa Roman Experience allows visitors a hands-on exploration of a Roman legionary base.

Din Lligwy

Din Lligwy is the site of a prehistoric settlement in Anglesey in Wales.

Dinmore Manor

Dinmore Manor House is a large rural house in a well-wooded, hilly part of Herefordshire in the least populous parish of the county, Dinmore. It was substantially rebuilt in late 16th century, altered around 1830 and extended around the year 1928. The main house is a Grade II listed building. The outlying chapel is mostly medieval and is grade II* listed.

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Dirleton Castle

Dirleton Castle was an imposing medieval fortress and noble residence, which is now a picturesque ruin not far from Edinburgh.

Dode, Kent

Dode (in Old English, Dowde) was a village in England that was wiped out by the Black Death in 1349. All that remains is the deconsecrated church, which was rebuilt in the 1990s.

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Dolaucothi Gold Mines

The Dolaucothi Gold Mines are ancient Roman surface and underground mines located in the valley of the River Cothi, near Pumsaint, Carmarthenshire, Wales. The Romans made extensive use of water carried by several aqueducts.

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Doune Castle

Doune Castle in Perthshire, central Scotland is a 14th century military stronghold built by Robert Stewart, Regent Albany and includes one of the best-preserved great halls in the whole of Scotland.

Dover Castle

The medieval Dover Castle is one of Britain’s most significant fortresses and has a fascinating and diverse history.

Dover Roman Fort

The remains of the Dover Roman Fort represent all that is left of the ancient Roman fleet base which served the large Roman naval detachment which defended British waters.

Dudley Castle

Dudley Castle is a ruined Norman motte and bailey castle which is now open to visitors and also hosts the popular Dudley Zoo within its grounds.

Dumbarton Castle

Dumbarton Castle served as a wartime prison, a royal shelter and a defence against both foreign and local threats.

Dumfries House

Dumfries House is a beautiful Palladian stately home in Scotland, particularly noted for its collection of original 18th-century furniture.

Dunfermline Abbey and Palace

Dunfermline Abbey and Palace was a royal residence and the final resting place of many a Scottish monarch.

Dunrobin Castle

One of Britain’s oldest continuously inhabited houses, Dunrobin Castle is the largest in the Northern Highlands as well as one of the most picturesque. Resembling a French chateau, Dunrobin is the family seat of the Earls of Sutherland and has been in their possession for over seven centuries.

Dunstaffnage Castle

Dunstaffnage Castle is a medieval stronghold once captured by Robert the Bruce.

Dunstanburgh Castle

Dunstanburgh Castle was a fourteenth century fortress, the striking ruins of which can be found on Northumberland’s coast.

Durham Cathedral

Durham Cathedral is a vast, mainly 12th Century, Romanesque cathedral built to house the relics of St Cuthbert.

Durnovaria

Durnovaria is the original Roman name for what is now the English town of Dorchester.

Eaton Socon Castle

Eaton Socon Castle stood beside the River Ouse in the village of Eaton Socon, which was originally a village in Bedfordshire but is now a district of St Neots in Cambridgeshire (grid reference TL174588).

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Edgecote Moor Battlefield

Edgecote Moor was the site of a battle in the Wars of the Roses which resulted in a victory for the Lancastrians.

Edgehill Battlefield

Edgehill Battlefield was the location of the first major engagement of the English Civil War, which took place on 23rd October 1642 in Warwickshire, England.

Elginhaugh

Elginhaugh Roman Fort was a Roman fort of the 1st century AD, located in Midlothian, Scotland.

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Ellesmere Castle

Ellesmere Castle was in the town of Ellesmere, Shropshire. (grid reference SJ403347).

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Eltham Palace

Eltham Palace is a spectacular Art Deco palace built in the 1930’s alongside a 15th century medieval hall.

Ely Castle

Ely Castle was in the cathedral city of Ely in Cambridgeshire. (grid reference TL541799). Its probable site is a mound near the cathedral which is now called Cherry Hill.

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Epsom Downs Racecourse

The Epsom Downs Racecourse was the site of one of the most iconic moment in the women’s rights movement.

Etton, Cambridgeshire

Etton is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority area of the city of Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, in England. For electoral purposes it forms part of Northborough ward in North West Cambridgeshire constituency. The parish had a population of 158 persons and 58 households in 2001.Woodcroft is a deserted medieval village and site of Woodcroft Castle.

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Exeter Cathedral

Exeter Cathedral is a large, impressive Gothic cathedral and is one of the most popular sites of the city. The Cathedral Green is also a great place for relaxing in the sunshine.

Falkland Palace

Falkland Palace was the country retreat and hunting lodge of the royal Stuart dynasty.

Fenton House

Fenton House is a well maintained seventeenth century house in Hampstead in North London.

Finchcocks House and Museum

Finchcocks House and Museum holds over 100 historical keyboard instruments and is housed in an 18th century manor house.

Fishbourne Roman Palace

Fishbourne Roman Palace hosts the remains of a huge Roman palace built in the 1st century AD. Today it operates as a museum and contains information, artefacts and mosaics.

Fotheringhay Castle

Fortheringhay Castle was the birthplace of Richard III and site of execution of Mary Queen of Scots.

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey was once a thriving monastery until Henry VIII’s Dissolution of the Monasteries. Its ruins are a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Framlingham Castle

Framlingham Castle is an impressive 12th century fortified castle in Suffolk.

Freud Museum

Based in Hampstead, London in the house Sigmund Freud and his family occupied after escaping from Austria following the Nazi annexation, the Freud Museum provides a fascinating journey through the mind and life of the founder of psychoanalysis.

Fulham Palace

For 1,300 years Fulham Palace was owned by the Bishops of London and it was used from the 11th century until 1975. Today the medieval and Tudor palace house a museum, gallery and beautiful botanic gardens telling the story of the palace as well as its Neolithic, Iron Age and Roman origins.

Furness Abbey

Furness Abbey is a partially ruined 12th century monastery which now operates as a tourist attraction and museum.

Gainsborough Old Hall

Gainsborough Old Hall is said to be one of England’s largest and best preserved medieval manor houses.

Glamis Castle

A magnificent castle in Glamis, Scotland, the French chateau styling and the historic setting provides an excellent day out.

Glasgow Cathedral

Glasgow Cathedral is one of Scotland’s most impressive surviving medieval structures.

Glastonbury Abbey

Glastonbury Abbey is one of the most important historic abbeys in Britain and the legendary burial place of King Arthur.

Glenlochar

Glenlochar (Gd: Gleann Lochair) is a hamlet on the western bank of the River Dee in the parish of Balmaghie in the historical county of Kirkcudbrightshire in Dumfries and Galloway. Glenlochar is located one and a half miles south of Balmaghie Kirk and 3 miles (5 km) north of Castle Douglas.

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Godolphin House

Godolphin House is a Cornish stately home built by Godolphin family, who were prominent in the reign of Queen Anne.

Goodrich Castle

Goodrich Castle is a picturesque Norman ruin in Herefordshire that was the site of a bitter siege during the English Civil War.

Great Orme Ancient Mines

The ancient copper mines discovered below the Great Orme date back over 4,000 years to the Bronze Age.

Greenhead Roman Army Museum

The Greenhead Roman Army Museum displays a series of artifacts and replicas of Roman military paraphernalia.

Greenway

Greenway is a stunning 18th century Grade II-listed Georgian mansion near Galmpton in Devon and it was the holiday home of the world-famous ‘Queen of Crime’, Agatha Christie. See the house just as she left it and take a glimpse into the private life of one of the world’s most celebrated authors.

Grey Point Fort

Grey Point Fort is a WWI era coastal defence battery and one of the best preserved early 20th century coastal forts anywhere in the British Isles.

HMS Belfast

HMS Belfast is a Royal Navy light cruiser ship that played a role in both World War II and the Korean War.

HMS Victory

HMS Victory was Vice Admiral Lord Nelson’s flagship during the Battle of Trafalgar and the site where this heroic figure died.

HMS Warrior

The HMS Warrior was launched in 1860 and is the sole surviving warship of Queen Victoria’s Black Battle Fleet.

Haddon Hall

Described by many as England’s finest and most complete fortified medieval manor house, Haddon Hall in Bakewell, overlooking the River Wye in Derbyshire dates from the 11th century and is the seat of the Duke of Rutland.

Hadrian’s Wall

Hadrian’s Wall is a magnificent remnant of Roman Britain and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Hailes Castle

Hailes Castle was a medieval stronghold, the pretty ruins of which date back mostly to the fourteenth century.

Haltwhistle Castle

Haltwhistle Castle Hill is a ruined Norman earth and timber ringwork fortress in Haltwhistle, Northumberland, England. There are no extant stone remains.

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Ham House

A 17th century mansion, Ham House is an opulent melting pot of British and European Renaissance design.

Hampton Court Palace

Hampton Court Palace is a medieval palace whch has served as everything from a royal residence to a prison.

Hardwick Hall

Built for Elizabeth, Dowager Countess of Shrewsbury, aka ‘Bess of Hardwick’ in the last decade of the sixteenth century, Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire is one of the UKs finest examples of an Elizabethan ‘prodigy house’.

Harlech Castle

Harlech Castle is a dramatic medieval stronghold and one of a ring of imposing castles built by Edward I in his conquest of Wales.

Hastings Castle

Hastings Castle was one of the first Norman castles to be built in England.

Hatfield House

Hatfield House is a Jacobean country house built on the site of what was Queen Elizabeth I’s childhood home.

Helmsley Castle

Helmsley Castle was a 12th century castle in York and the site of a dramatic siege during the English Civil War.

Heronbridge Roman Site

Heronbridge Roman Site is the remains a Roman settlement on both sides of Watling Street, about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) south of Chester in Cheshire, England, with evidence of industrial activity (furnaces) in the late 1st and 2nd centuries. The site is a Scheduled Ancient Monument.

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Highclere Castle

Highclere Castle is a picturesque Jacobean style country house in Hampshire, which in more modern times has become well known as the location of the television series Downton Abbey.

Hod Hill

Hod Hill is one of the largest Iron Age hillforts in Dorset.

Holyroodhouse Palace

Holyroodhouse Palace is the Scottish royal residence famed as having been home to Mary Queen of Scots.

Hopton Castle

Hopton Castle is situated in the village of the same name which lies approximately halfway between Knighton and Craven Arms, in the English county of Shropshire. Hopton Castle featured in the British TV series Time Team in 2010. A ruin since the early 18th century, it was partially restored between 2006 and 2011, and was officially re-opened to the public as a visitor attraction in December 2011 by the Duke of Gloucester.

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Horniman Museum

Frederick John Horniman opened his eponymous museum in Forest Hill, south London in 1901 after inheriting his father’s business.

Houses of Parliament

The Houses of Parliament are the home of the UK Parliament.

Housesteads Roman Fort

Housesteads Roman Fort is one of the best preserved and most important of the forts along Hadrian’s Wall.

Hunterian Museum

The Hunterian Museum in Lincoln’s Inn Fields is one of, if not the world’s finest medical museums and includes items from luminaries such as Jenner, Banks and Darwin.

Huntingdon Castle

Huntingdon Castle was situated in the town of Huntingdon in Cambridgeshire (grid reference TL240714).

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Hylton Castle

Hylton Castle was the private home of a wealthy family in Medieval England.

Imperial War Museum

The Imperial War Museum is a London-based museum dedicated to world conflict.

Imperial War Museum Duxford

Duxford Imperial War Museum in Cambridge explores military history on land, by air and by sea.

Inchcolm Abbey

Inchcolm Abbey is a well-preserved twelfth century Augustinian monastery turned abbey located in an important defensive position.

Inchmahome Priory

Inchmahome Priory was a medieval monastery which once sheltered a young Mary Queen of Scots.

Inchtuthil

Inchtuthil is the site of a Roman legionary fortress situated on a natural platform overlooking the north bank of the River Tay southwest of Blairgowrie, Perth and Kinross, Scotland (Roman Caledonia).

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Inveraray Jail

One of Scotland’s top tourist attractions, Inveraray Jail on the shore of Loch Fyne is a 19th century prison and courthouse. It has been transformed in to a living museum depicting an often brutal and miserable life behind bars for men, women and children – some as young as seven.

Inverquharity

Inverquharity is a Roman fortlet in Scotland, close to the Highland Line about 5 miles (8 km) north of Kirriemuir, Angus.

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Jarlshof

Jarlshof is the best known prehistoric archaeological site in Shetland, Scotland. It lies in Sumburgh, Mainland, Shetland and has been described as "one of the most remarkable archaeological sites ever excavated in the British Isles". It contains remains dating from 2500 BC up to the 17th century AD.

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Jervaulx Abbey

The ruins of the 12th Century Cistercian monastery of Jervaulx Abbey, situated in the picturesque Yorkshire Dales.

Jew's House

The Jew's House is one of the earliest extant town houses in England. It is situated on Steep Hill in Lincoln, immediately below Jew's Court. The house has traditionally been associated with the thriving Jewish community in Medieval Lincoln. Antisemitic hysteria was stoked by a notorious 1255 blood libel falsely alleging the murder that a child, called Little Saint Hugh of Lincoln, was ritually killed by Jews. In 1290, the entire Jewish community was expelled from England, and the Jew's House is said to have been seized from a Jewish owner. The building has remained continuously occupied to the present day. Since about 1973 it has been used as a restaurant; before that it was an antiques shop.

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Jewel Tower

The Jewel Tower is one of the last remnants of the medieval Westminster Palace.

Jewry Wall

The Jewry Wall is a substantial ruined wall of 2nd-century Roman masonry, with two large archways, in Leicester, England. It stands alongside St Nicholas' Circle and St Nicholas' Church. It formed the west wall of a public building in Ratae Corieltauvorum (Roman Leicester), alongside public baths, the foundations of which were excavated in the 1930s and are also open to view. The wall gives its name to the adjacent Jewry Wall Museum.

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Jews' Court, Lincoln

Jews' Court is the headquarters of the Society for Lincolnshire History and Archaeology and a Grade I listed building.

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Jordan Hill Roman Temple

Jordan Hill Roman Temple is a Romano-Celtic temple and Roman ruin situated on Jordan Hill above Bowleaze Cove in the eastern suburbs of Weymouth in Dorset, England. Original amateur excavations on the site in 1843, by J. Medhurst, were followed by a series of excavations in the 20th century suggesting that the site was in operation between c. AD 69–79 to the late 4th century.

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Jorvik Viking Centre

The Jorvik Viking Centre recreates the Viking city of Jorvik, based on excavations found on this site in York.

Kelvedon Hatch Nuclear Bunker

The Kelvedon Hatch Nuclear Bunker is an enormous, three-storey, Cold War-era subterranean shelter and operations centre in Brentwood, Essex. It was constructed in 1952.

Kenfig Castle

Kenfig Castle is a ruined castle in Bridgend County Borough in Wales that came to prominence after the Anglo-Norman invasion of Wales in the late 11th century.

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Kenilworth Castle

Kenilworth Castle is a former medieval stronghold and royal palace, most famed as the home of Elizabeth’s beloved Robert Dudley.

Kensington Palace

Kensington Palace was the childhood home of Queen Victoria and the home of Diana, Princess of Wales, until her death.

Kenwood House

Kenwood House is a picturesque historic stately home in North London.

Kew Palace

Kew Palace is a seventeenth century palace which once served as a royal residence.

Kidwelly Castle

Kidwelly Castle is a Norman masterpiece which still stands majestically in the calm Welsh countryside as a reminder of the tumultuous Anglo-Welsh past.

Kimbolton Castle

Kimbolton Castle is a country house in Kimbolton, Huntingdonshire, Cambridgeshire. It was the final home of King Henry VIII's first wife, Catherine of Aragon. Originally a medieval castle but converted into a stately palace, it was the family seat of the Dukes of Manchester from 1615 until 1950. It now houses Kimbolton School.

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King John's Palace, Southampton

King John's Palace is a ruined Norman merchant's house in Southampton, England. Incorrectly believed for a period to have been used by King John, resulting in its modern name, the west wall of the house was converted to form part of the city's defensive walls in the early 14th century and its archways contain what may be Britain's earliest surviving gunports. The structure now forms part of the Tudor House Museum in the city and is a Scheduled Ancient Monument.

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King Johns Palace

King Johns Palace is a ruined Norman townhouse built around 1180AD, the remains of which are now open to the public.

King’s College Chapel

Regarded as one of the world’s finest examples of Perpendicular Gothic English architecture, King’s College Chapel at King’s College in the University of Cambridge is unspeakably magnificent. Built between 1446 and 1531, like the Eiffel Tower in Paris or Rome’s Colosseum, it is such an iconic and immediately recognisable building in Cambridge it’s used as a symbol for the entire city.

Kinneil House and Museum

Kinneil Estate is a fantastic historic site, centred around the 15th century Kinneil House. Also at the site are a Roman fortlet, the ruins of a medieval church, a museum and the cottage of inventor James Watt.

Kirtling Tower

Kirtling Tower was a medieval castle and Tudor country house in Kirtling, Cambridgeshire, England, of which the gatehouse still remains.

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Knockin Castle

Knockin Castle is situated in the village of Knockin on Shropshire between Oswestry and Shrewsbury (grid reference SJ334223).

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Launceston Castle

Launceston Castle is located in the town of Launceston, Cornwall, England. It was probably built by Robert the Count of Mortain after 1068, and initially comprised an earthwork and timber castle with a large motte in one corner. Launceston Castle formed the administrative centre of the new earldom of Cornwall, with a large community packed within the walls of its bailey. It was rebuilt in stone in the 12th century and then substantially redeveloped by Richard of Cornwall after 1227, including a high tower to enable visitors to view his surrounding lands. When Richard's son, Edmund, inherited the castle, he moved the earldom's administration to Lostwithiel, triggering the castle's decline. By 1337, the castle was increasingly ruinous and used primarily as a gaol and to host judicial assizes.

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Leeds Castle

Leeds Castle in Kent was a twelfth century stronghold which has since served as a royal palace, a prison and as a stately home.

Lesnes Abbey

Lesnes Abbey is a ruined Norman abbey located in South East London and now forms part of a scenic park and nature reserve.

Liberton Tower

Liberton Tower is a 15th century tower in Edinburgh.

Lincoln Castle

Built by William the Conqueror in 1068, Lincoln Castle is one of England’s best preserved and most impressive Norman castles.

Lincoln Cathedral

Lincoln Cathedral is an imposing medieval structure with a history dating back to Norman times.

Lindisfarne Priory

Lindisfarne Priory, on the mystical Holy Island, is the dramatic ruin of a eleventh century Benedictine monastery and a place of pilgrimage.

Linlithgow Palace

Linlithgow Palace was the birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots and host to most of the Stuart kings.

Liverpool Cathedral

Described by the poet Sir John Betjeman as one of the great buildings of the world Britain's largest cathedral adorns Liverpool's landscape.

Llanthony Priory

Once considered to be one of medieval Wales’ greatest buildings, Llanthony Priory is a partly-ruined, thousand year-old Augustinian priory in the beautifully secluded Vale of Ewyas in the Black Mountains, part of the Brecon Beacons National Park.

Lochleven Castle

Lochleven Castle was a medieval stronghold most renowned for being the prison of Mary Queen of Scots.

London Mithraeum

Perhaps London’s most famous 20th century Roman discovery, the Temple of Mithras is a Roman mithraeum – a temple built by worshippers of the mysterious cult-like god Mithras – built in the late second century and discovered in 1954 during building work in Walbrook, a street in the City of London.

London Roman Amphitheatre

The London Roman Amphitheatre was built in the first century AD and is the only one of its kind in the city.

London Roman Fort

The London Roman Fort was a second century fort which housed Roman Londinium’s soldiers.

London Roman Wall

The London Roman Wall was built in around the third century AD and parts of it can be seen today.

London Transport Museum

Offering visitors a fascinating insight into 200 years of the history of London’s transport systems, the London Transport Museum is one of the city’s most popular tourist attractions.

London Troops War Memorial

Standing proud outside the Royal Exchange building in the City of London, the London Troops War Memorial commemorates the men and women who gave their lives for King, Queen and country during World War I and World War II.

Longovicium

​Longovicium was an auxiliary fort on Dere Street, in the Roman province of Britannia Inferior. It is located just southwest of Lanchester in the English county of Durham, roughly 8 miles to the west of the city of Durham.

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Ludgershall Castle

Ludgershall Castle was a medieval royal castle and hunting lodge, of which only ruins and earthworks remain.

Ludlow Castle

Ludlow Castle, the finest of medieval ruined castles, set in glorious Shropshire countryside, at the heart of this superb, bustling black

Lullingstone Roman Villa

Lullingstone Roman Villa is a fine example of a 1st Century Roman villa. Built roughly 50 years after the Roman conquest of Britain, it was home to the wealthier elements of Romano-British society.

Lutyens Crypt

Beneath the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral is the Lutyens Crypt, a stunning space often referred to as Liverpool’s third cathedral’ designed by Edwin Lutyens, Britain’s greatest 20th century architect.

Lyme Park

Located on the edge of the Peak District, Lyme Park estate is set in 1400 acres of picturesque parkland and centred on the elegant Lyme Hall. The house famously featured as Pemberley in the BBC’s Pride and Prejudice.

Lyveden New Bield

Lyveden New Bield is an historic garden perfectly preserved in its original Elizabethan state.

Maeshowe

Maeshowe (or Maes Howe; Old Norse: Orkhaugr) is a Neolithic chambered cairn and passage grave situated on Mainland Orkney, Scotland. It was probably built around 2800 BC. In the archaeology of Scotland, it gives its name to the Maeshowe type of chambered cairn, which is limited to Orkney. Maeshowe is a significant example of Neolithic craftsmanship and is, in the words of the archaeologist Stuart Piggott, "a superlative monument that by its originality of execution is lifted out of its class into a unique position." The monuments around Maeshowe, including Skara Brae, were designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999.

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Maeshowe

Close to the south-eastern shore of the freshwater Loch of Harray on the island of Orkney is Maeshowe, without question the finest chambered tomb (cairn) in western Europe.

Maiden Castle

Maiden Castle is vast, well preserved Iron Age hill fort in Dorchester.

Manorbier Castle

Described as the most pleasant spot in Wales, Manorbier is a well preserved medieval castle located on the Welsh coast in Pembrokeshire.

Mapperton House

Home of the Earl and Countess of Sandwich, Mapperton House in Dorset was described by County Life magazine as 'the nation's finest manor house' and the gardens are equally as exquisite.

Maumbury Rings

Maumbury Rings is a Neolithic henge in the south of Dorchester town in Dorset, England (grid reference SY690899). It is a large circular earthwork, 85 metres in diameter, with a single bank and an entrance to the north east. It was modified during the Roman period when it was adapted for use as an amphitheatre, and the site was remodelled again during the English Civil War when it was used as an artillery fort guarding the southern approach to Dorchester. The monument is now a public open space, and used for open-air concerts, festivals and re-enactments.

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Maxey Castle

Maxey Castle was a medieval fortified manor house castle in Maxey, Cambridgeshire, England.

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Middleham Castle

Middleham Castle was the childhood home of King Richard III.

Minerva's Shrine, Chester

Minerva's Shrine is a shrine to the Roman goddess Minerva in Edgar's Field, Handbridge, Chester, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building. The shrine dates from the early 2nd century and is carved into the face of a sandstone quarry. It is the only monument of its kind in Western Europe that remains in its original location. It is protected by a 19th-century stone surround with a hood, which was refurbished in the late 20th century. The carving has weathered over the centuries and has also been damaged by human activity. Next to the shrine is an opening into the rock face which is possibly a natural fissure that has been enlarged and which is known as Edgar's Cave.The shrine stands beside the route of the old main Roman road into the fortress of Deva from the south. Minerva was the Roman goddess of war, knowledge, and craftsmanship. She is often depicted with her attributes of helmet, shield, breastplate, and spear, but in this instance she is shown in a simplified form, standing in a representation of a temple. The Roman quarry, together with Edgar's Field and the image of Minerva, is a Scheduled Monument.A cast of the shrine is kept in the Grosvenor Museum, in Chester.

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Monnow Bridge

Monnow Bridge is a 13th century fortified bridge and the only one in Britain whose gate tower still stands in place.

Moor Park Mansion

A listed Palladian mansion now used as a golf clubhouse.

Moreton Corbet Castle

Moreton Corbet Castle is an English Heritage property located near the village of Moreton Corbet, Shropshire, England, 8 miles northeast of Shrewsbury. It is a Grade I listed building. The ruins are from two different eras: a medieval stronghold and an Elizabethan era manor house. The buildings have been out of use since the 18th century.

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Multangular Tower

The Multangular Tower is a third century AD ten-sided stone tower originally forming part of York’s Roman legionary fortress and now located in the gardens of the York Museum.

Museum of London

The Museum of London explores the history of the UK’s capital city.

Nash’s House and New Place

Nash’s House and New Place represent the place where William Shakespeare spent his final years and where he died.

National Museum Cardiff

The National Museum Cardiff has a diverse collection ranging from art to natural history and archaeology.

National Museum of Scotland

The National Museum of Scotland has a diverse collection of artefacts and pieces relating to the history and culture of Scotland.

Navio Roman Fort

Navio Roman fort overlooks a tight bend of the River Noe at Brough-on-Noe near Hope, Derbyshire, in England. Navio fort and vicus (civilian settlement) is a Scheduled Monument.The town was recorded as Nauione in the Ravenna Cosmography's list of all known places in the world in about 700 AD. The entry is followed by places with which Navio had road connections: Aquis Arnemeza (Buxton), Zerdotalia (Ardotalia, later called Melandra fort, near Glossop) and Mantio (Manchester). There is also an entry for the river Anava, next to the river Dorvantium, which is considered to be the River Derwent.

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Nelson’s Column

Nelson’s Column is a monument dedicated to Admiral Lord Nelson in London’s Trafalgar Square.

Newark Priory

Newark Priory is a ruined priory on an island surrounded by the River Wey and its former leat (the Abbey Stream) near the boundary of the village (parish lands) of Ripley and Pyrford in Surrey, England.

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Newman Passage, Fitzrovia

Linking Newman Street with Rathbone Street in Fitzrovia, Newman Passage is an innocuous but historically-fascinating cobbled cut-through dating from 1746.

Newport Arch

Newport Arch is the name given to the remains of a 3rd-century Roman gate in the city of Lincoln, Lincolnshire. It is a Scheduled monument and Grade I listed building and is reputedly the oldest arch in the United Kingdom still used by traffic.

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Norman House

Norman House on Steep Hill, Lincoln, England is an historic building and an example of Norman domestic architecture.The building is at 46–47 Steep Hill and 7 Christs Hospital Terrace. The architectural evidence suggests a date between 1170 and 1180.The building was known for many years as "Aaron the Jew's House", and appears as such in many references, as it was thought to be the former residence of Aaron of Lincoln (d.1186), although this is now considered incorrect.

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Normandykes

Normandykes (Grid Reference: NO 830994) is the site of a Roman marching camp 1 mile (1.6 km) to the southwest of Peterculter, City of Aberdeen, Scotland. The near-rectangular site, measuring approximately 860 by 510 metres (940 by 560 yd), covers about 106 acres (43 ha) of the summit and eastern slopes of a hill overlooking the River Dee and the B9077 road further south. Aerial photographs for Normandykes have been archived between 1947 and 1976. The camp is about 6 miles (10 km), or less than half a day's march, north of the Raedykes camp. It is possible that the actual route taken would have entailed one day's march, over a route likely chosen to avoid the Red Moss, a virtually uncrossable bog near the present day village of Netherley. Normandykes was first excavated in the year 1935 by Richmond and MacIntyre; construction is thought to date to the Antonine or Severan periods.

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North Leigh Roman Villa

North Leigh Roman Villa was a first century villa, the remains of which can be seen in Oxfordshire.

Norton Priory

Norton Priory is a historic site in Norton, Runcorn, Cheshire, England, comprising the remains of an abbey complex dating from the 12th to 16th centuries, and an 18th-century country house; it is now a museum. The remains are a scheduled ancient monument and are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building. They are considered to be the most important monastic remains in Cheshire.

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Okehampton Castle

Okehampton Castle was once Devon’s largest castle and was listed in the Doomsday Book.

Old Gorhambury House

The ruins of a Tudor mansion that was the contemporary cutting-edge, Queen Elizabeth herself visited the property. The house gained repute as home to Sir Nicholas Bacon and later his celebrated son Sir Francis.

Old Scatness

Old Scatness is an archeological site in the parish of Dunrossness in the south end of Mainland, Shetland, near Sumburgh Airport and consists of medieval, Viking, Pictish, and Iron Age remains. It has been a settlement for thousands of years, each new generation adding buildings, and leveling off old ones. Among the discoveries is an Iron Age broch.

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Orford Castle

Orford Castle was a 12th century fortified castle built during the reign of King Henry II.

Oxford Castle

A partly-ruined medieval castle built for William the Conqueror in 1071, Oxford Castle transformed into a prison after the English Civil War and visitors can immerse themselves in 1,000 years of mystery, intrigue, escapes, ghosts and brutal jailers as well as the origins of Oxford University.

Pennymuir Roman camps

The Pennymuir Roman camps are situated southeast of Jedburgh in the Scottish Borders area of Scotland, near the Anglo-Scottish border, in the former Roxburghshire. The site, alongside the course of the Roman road known as Dere Street, consists of the remains of four Roman temporary camps, a linear earthwork and an area of rig. The site is also sometimes referred to as the Towford camps.

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Penshaw Monument

Sitting throne-like overlooking Herrington County Park in Sunderland, the Penshaw Monument was built in 1844 to honour John George Lambton, the first Earl of Durham and is a half-size replica of the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens.

Penshurst Place

One of the best examples of a medieval fortified manor house in the UK, Penshurst is a well preserved medieval historic house which has strong royal connections.

Peterborough Castle

Peterborough Castle, also known as Mount Thorold and Touthill, was a medieval motte and bailey castle in Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England.

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Pevensey Castle

Pevensey Castle is a picturesque ruin of a medieval castle built in the place where William the Conqueror landed in 1066.

Plymouth Hoe

Plymouth Hoe has been the starting point of historic journeys by Sir Francis Drake and Captain James Cook as well as many others.

Pontefract Castle

Originally a Norman structure, Pontefract castle played an increasingly important role in English Royal history for over 500 years. Today it lies in ruins but has much for visitors to enjoy, including its underground dungeons.

Port an Eilean Mhòir boat burial

The Port an Eilean Mhòir ship burial is a Viking boat burial site in Ardnamurchan, Scotland, the most westerly point on the island of Great Britain. Dated to the 10th century, the burial consists of a Viking boat about 5 metres (16 ft) long by 1.5 metres (4.9 ft) wide in which a man was laid to rest with his shield, sword and spear as well as other grave goods.In 1924 nails, rivets and other finds were discovered by T. C. Lethbridge at Cul na Croise (English: Gorten Bay) in Ardnamurchan, which were characterised at the time as having come from a ship burial; the exact location of this site is lost and so the nature of the finds cannot be determined with certainty. A similar case was the mainland burial site at Huna, in Caithness, discovered in 1935, although this was better documented and is accepted as a ship burial. Nine other Viking ship burials, or possible burials, have been found on Scottish islands, including six in the Hebrides and another three in the Northern Isles.The discovery was announced by archaeologists from the Ardnamurchan Transitions Project, directed by the Universities of Manchester and Leicester, CFA Archaeology and Archaeology Scotland on 18 October 2011. Students and academics have for several years investigated archaeological sites on the Ardnamurchan peninsula and have previously made a number of discoveries, including an Iron Age fort and a Neolithic chambered cairn. The project aims to examine social change on the peninsula from 6,000 years ago to the 18th- and 19th-century Highland Clearances. Its work has been supported by the Ardnamurchan Estate, which owns a large part of the peninsula.The site is located on the north coast of Ardnamurchan at Port an Eilean Mhòir between Achateny and Ockle. The archaeologists had initially thought that the site of the burial was merely a mound of rocks cleared from fields in recent times. On further investigation it was realised that it was a boat burial.

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Porthcuno Telegraph Museum

The Porthcurno Telegraph Museum examines the history of telegraphic development as well as housing Britain’s vital WWII underground communications centre.

Powis Castle

Powis Castle was built by Welsh princes in the early thirteenth century and has maintained much of its exterior grandeur.

Raedykes

Raedykes is the site of a Roman marching camp located just over 3 miles (5 km) NW of Stonehaven, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. National Grid Reference NO 842902. It is designated as a scheduled monument. A marching camp was a temporary camp used mainly for overnight stops on a long route between more permanent forts, or as a temporary base while on campaign in hostile territory.

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Raglan Castle

Raglan Castle is the dramatic ruin of a 15th century castle destroyed in the English Civil War.

Rampton Castle

Rampton Castle, known locally as Giant's Hill, is the earthwork remains of a motte and bailey castle in Rampton, Cambridgeshire. It is believed that the castle was constructed during The Anarchy by the forces of King Stephen to contain the revolt of Geoffrey de Mandeville. The castle was not completed; construction was probably halted by de Mandeville's death at nearby Burwell Castle in 1144. Sited near to the churchyard of All Saints' Church, the castle is thought to have been built over the eastern end of the medieval village.

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Restormel Castle

Restormel Castle was a 13th century castle in Cornwall, the pretty ruins of which are well preserved.

Rhuddlan Castle

Rhuddlan Castle was one of the iron ring of strongholds built by Edward I in his conquest of Wales.

Richard III Museum

The Richard III Museum is a small museum in York's historic Monk Bar, dedicated to the life of this famous English monarch.

Richard III: Leicester’s Search for a King Exhibition

Discover the exciting exhibition at Leicester's medieval Guildhall, detailing the archaeological search for the lost grave of King Richard III...

Richborough Roman Fort

Richborough Roman Fort in Kent marks the site where the Romans successfully invaded Britain in 43 AD.

Richmond Castle

Richmond Castle is a picturesque ruined Norman Castle which was originally built to help secure Norman control of the North of England. Today visitors can explore the castle’s ruins as well as taking in the stunning views of the surrounding countryside.

Rochester Castle

One of the best-preserved Norman fortifications in England, Rochester Castle was built at a strategic crossroads in the years following the Norman Conquest. Today the castle has been largely restored and is open to visitors under the custodianship of English Heritage.

Roman Bath House Museum

In 1930 in the basement of the Mail Coach Inn in St. Sampson’s Square in York, renovators stumbled across the 1,900 year old remains of a Roman ‘caldarium’, or steam bath.

Roman Ribchester

The remains of Ribchester Roman Fort and the Ribchester Roman Bathhouse can be seen alongside the Ribchester Roman Museum.

Roman Town House, Dorchester

The Roman Town House in Dorchester is a Roman ruin within Colliton Park, Dorchester, Dorset. Dorset County Council acquired Colliton Park in 1933 as the site for the construction of County Hall. The Town House was discovered in 1937/38 during an archaeological investigation carried out by the Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society prior to the construction of the new building. Plans for County Hall were modified so that the Town House could be retained on site.

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Rosslyn Chapel

Rosslyn Chapel is a fifteenth century Catholic Church near Edinburgh in Scotland brimming with mysterious carvings.

Rothesay Castle

Rothesay Castle is a distinctive medieval ruin with strong links to the royal Stewart dynasty.

Rough Castle Fort

Rough Castle Fort is a Roman fort on the Antonine Wall roughly 2 kilometres south east of Bonnybridge near Tamfourhill in the Falkirk council area, Scotland. It is owned by the National Trust for Scotland.

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Rowton Castle

Rowton Castle, near Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England, is a Grade II* listed country house that was once the home of the Royal Normal College for the Blind before it moved to its present location in Hereford. This 17th-century castle is surrounded by 17 acres of gardens, and is approximately six miles (9.7 km) from Shrewsbury. Since bought It is currently used as a wedding venue, hotel and restaurant.

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Royal Navy Submarine Museum

Home of the WWII submarine HMS Alliance, the Royal Navy Submarine Museum is a family-orientated, interactive museum detailing the history of British submarine warfare.

Rubha an Dùnain

Rubha an Dùnain or Rubh' an Dùnain (Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [ᵲu(.ə) ən t̪uːnən]) is an uninhabited peninsula to the south of the Cuillin hills on the island of Skye in Scotland. This headland rises to over 30 metres (98 ft) above sea level. Loch na h-Airde or Loch na h-Àirde (Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [ɫ̪ɔx nə haːɾʃtʲə]) is a body of freshwater that is situated to the east of the peninsula close to the sea shore. To its north is Camas a' Mhùrain (bay of the marram grass).The peninsula has a variety of archaeological sites dating from the Neolithic period onwards. The name of the peninsula is Gaelic—the meaning of Rubha an Dùn is evidently "headland of the fort" but the last syllable is less clear. In a different context, Mac an Tàilleir suggests Dùnain may mean either "bird's hill" (Dùn Eòin) or "John's fort" (Dùn Eòin/Dùn Iain).

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Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral in Wiltshire is perhaps the finest example of Early English Gothic architecture in existence. Discover the UK’s tallest church spire and the best surviving of the four remaining copies of the 800 year-old Magna Carta.

Sandal Castle

Sandal Castle was the site of an important battle in the Wars of the Roses.

Scar boat burial

The Scar boat burial is a Viking boat burial near the village of Scar, on Sanday, in Orkney, Scotland. The burial, which dates to between 875 and 950 AD, contained the remains of a man, an elderly woman, and a child, along with numerous grave goods. Although the site had to be excavated quickly because of the threat of coastal erosion owing to bad weather conditions, it yielded many important finds.

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Scone Palace

Scone Palace was once the coronation site of the Kings of Scotland and today operates as an historic house and garden.

Seabegs Wood

Seabegs Wood was the site of a Roman fortlet on the Antonine Wall in Scotland.At Seabegs, the outline of Antonine's Wall, has lasted. Archaeologists from previous generations recorded this and stated that the ditch was deep and waterlogged.There is an underpass under the Forth and Clyde Canal nearby known locally as the Pend.In the 1890s, the Antonine Wall Committee of Glasgow Archaeological Society's cut several trenches across the Roman rampart. These uncovered its stone base. Subsequent excavations in 1977 found a Roman fortlet attached to the south of the Rampart. In 1981, a mound was examined but little has been discovered.

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Segedunum Roman Fort

Segedunum Roman Fort was one of the Ancient Roman wall forts of Hadrian’s Wall.

Selby Abbey

In existence since 1069, Selby Abbey has been used for worship for over 900 years. In the heart of Yorkshire and often known as the hidden gem of the county, it is not especially well known despite being unmatched in its beauty and archaic stance.

Sheffield Manor Lodge

Once a prominent Tudor country estate and one-time prison of Mary Queen of Scots, the remains of Sheffield Manor Lodge include the well-preserved Tudor Turret House.

Sherborne Castle

Sherborne Castle is a 16th century Tudor mansion in the market town of Sherborne in Dorset, overlooking the River Yeo. It was built by Sir Walter Raleigh in 1594 and includes 42 acres of Capability Brown-designed landscaped gardens.

Shrewsbury Castle

Shrewsbury Castle is a red sandstone castle in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. It stands on a hill in the neck of the meander of the River Severn on which the town originally developed. The castle, directly above Shrewsbury railway station, is a Grade I listed building.

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Silbury Hill

A Stone Age chalk mound with a mysterious past, Silbury Hill is the largest man-made mound in Europe.

Silchester Roman Town

Silchester Roman Town flourished from the mid-first century AD and was eventually abandoned.

Skara Brae

Skara Brae is Northern Europe’s best preserved Neolithic village and a UNESCO World Heritage site located in the Orkney Isles.

St Albans

St Albans is a wonderful market town and the site of the execution of Britain’s first Christian martyr (209AD).

St Bride’s Church

Located in London’s journalistic heartland of Fleet Street, St Bride’s is a restored 17th century church, steeped in history and originally designed by Sir Christopher Wren.

St Bridget’s Parish Church

St Bridget’s Parish Church in the Merseyside town of West Kirby was founded by Irish Christian Vikings around the 11th century and amongst other treasures houses the 10th century Hogback Stone.

St Dunstan in the East

The majestic ruins of the ancient church of St Dunstan-in-the-East represent one of London’s best hidden gems and now form the centre point of a pretty public garden.

St Fagans National History Museum

St Fagans National History Museum is a unique open-air museum of the history of Wales.

St James’s Palace

St James’s Palace has been the official residence of the British Sovereign since the reign of King Henry VIII.

St John’s College

St John’s College is part of the University of Cambridge founded in April 1511 by Lady Margaret Beaufort, mother of King Henry VII.

St Magnus Cathedral

St Magnus Cathedral, Kirkwall dominates the skyline of Kirkwall, the main town of Orkney, a group of islands off the north coast of mainland Scotland. It is the most northerly cathedral in the United Kingdom, a fine example of Romanesque architecture built for the bishops of Orkney when the islands were ruled by the Norse Earls of Orkney. It is owned not by the church, but by the burgh of Kirkwall as a result of an act of King James III of Scotland following Orkney's annexation by the Scottish Crown in 1468. It has its own dungeon.

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St Margaret’s Church, Westminster

Founded in the 12th century by Benedictine monks, St Margaret’s is dedicated to third century saint Margaret of Antioch and was constructed entirely within the grounds of Westminster Abbey.

St Mary’s Abbey

St Mary’s Abbey is a picturesque ruined Benedictine abbey in York, located in York Museum Gardens.

St Mary’s Church Nether Alderley

St Mary’s Church of Nether Alderley is a picturesque 14th century church in Cheshire.

St Paul’s Cathedral

St Paul’s Cathedral is an iconic historic building in central London and the seat of the Diocese of London.

Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle is an iconic royal palace, a medieval stronghold and a focal point for many of the most important events in Scotland’s history.

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle is one of the finest surviving fortified manor houses in England, and situated at Stokesay in Shropshire. It was largely built in its present form in the late 13th century by Laurence de Ludlow, on the earlier castle (some of which still survives) founded by its original owners the de Lacy family, from whom it passed to their de Verdun heirs, who retained feudal overlordship of Stokesay until at least 1317. Laurence 'of' Ludlow was one of the leading wool merchants in England, who intended it to form a secure private house and generate income as a commercial estate. Laurence's descendants continued to own the castle until the 16th century, when it passed through various private owners. By the time of the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1641, Stokesay was owned by William Craven, the first Earl of Craven and a supporter of King Charles I. After the Royalist war effort collapsed in 1645, Parliamentary forces besieged the castle in June and quickly forced its garrison to surrender. Parliament ordered the property to be slighted, but only minor damage was done to the walls, allowing Stokesay to continue to be used as a house by the Baldwyn family until the end of the 17th century.

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Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a mysterious collection of vast stone circles dating back to around 3000 BC and a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Stourhead

A stately home set in the Wiltshire countryside, Stourhead House and Estate includes a wealth of impressive attractions – from the eighteenth century house to the ornate gardens and grounds with their Romanesque temples. Fun for all the family, this site won’t disappoint.

Stracathro

Stracathro (Scottish Gaelic: Srath Catharach) is a small place in Angus, Scotland.

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Strageath

Strageath is a Roman camp near the River Earn in eastern Scotland. Strageath was one of a chain of camps that the Romans used in their march northward. Other notable camps in this chain are Ardoch, Battledykes, Stracathro, Raedykes and Normandykes.

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Sutton Hoo

Site of discovery of Anglo-Saxon ship burial.

Tantallon Castle

Tantallon Castle was the imposing medieval stronghold of an influential Scottish family.

Temple Church

The Temple Church in London was established by the Knights Templar in the twelfth century.

Temple of Claudius, Colchester

The Temple of Claudius or Temple of the Deified Claudius was a large octastyle temple built in Camulodunum, the modern Colchester in Essex. The main building was constructed between 49 and 60 CE, although additions were built throughout the Roman-era. Today it forms the base of the Norman Colchester Castle.

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The Antonine Wall

The Antonine Wall was a Roman defensive wall, the remains of which can now be seen in Scotland.

The Foundling Museum

The Foundling Museum tells the story of the famous orphanage which once stood on the site as well as holding an important art collection of works donated to it.

The Geffrye Museum of the Home

The Geffrye Museum in Shoreditch is dedicated to the changing styles of homes and gardens covering four centuries of styles, tastes, furnishings and decorations from 17th century oak panelling to today’s ultra-modern decor.

The Great Fire of London Monument

The Great Fire of London Monument commemorates the major fire of 1666.

The Judges Lodgings

The Judges Lodgings in Presteigne is a living museum of its own history as a Victorian courthouse and judges’ lodgings.

The London Royal Air Force Museum

The London Royal Air Force Museum offers a great overview of the history of aviation in combat as well as housing over 100 aircraft from around the world.

The Mary Rose

The Mary Rose was King Henry VIII’s favourite warship, sunk in 1545 and recovered in 1982.

The Merchant’s House

The Merchant’s House in Marlborough is a fine example of a 17th century silk merchant’s home.

The Roman Lighthouse

The Roman Lighthouse in Dover is a ruined first century AD Roman tower which is one of the best-preserved of its kind anywhere in the world.

The Sanctuary (Avebury)

The Sanctuary near Avebury houses the remains of a Neolithic monument and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

The Tower of London

The Tower of London is a famous fortress and prison originally commissioned by the first Norman king, William the Conqueror.

The Vyne

The Vyne is a 16th century English historic house which once played host to King Henry VIII and contains the original Tudor chapel.

Thornbury Castle

Thornbury Castle is an original Tudor manor house which once played host to King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn.

Tong Castle

Tong Castle was a very large mostly Gothic country house in Shropshire whose site is between Wolverhampton and Telford, set within a park landscaped by Capability Brown, on the site of a medieval castle of the same name.

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Torphichen Preceptory

Torphichen Preceptory was an important base in Scotland for the Knights Hospitaller.

Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge is an iconic nineteenth century bridge over the Thames in London.

Towton Battlefield

The largest and bloodiest battle of the Wars of the Roses, where over 28,000 men are thought to have died in a single day.

Trematon Castle

Trematon Castle is situated near Saltash in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It was the caput of the feudal barony of Trematon. It is similar in style to the later Restormel Castle, with a 12th-century keep. Trematon Castle overlooks Plymouth Sound and was built probably by Robert, Count of Mortain on the ruins of an earlier Roman fort: it is a motte-and-bailey castle and dates from soon after the Norman conquest. It occupies a sentinel position one and a half miles south-east of Trematon village (grid reference SX41065801).

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Trimontium Museum

The Roman fort of Trimontium no longer stands, but the nearby museum uses artefacts and replicas to tell a story of a military power and the struggles that took place on the border with Scotland.

Tudor House and Garden

The Tudor House and Garden is a restored 15th century Tudor home and one of Southampton’s most important historic buildings.

Tullie House Museum

Opened in 1893, Tullie House Museum in Carlisle is a converted Jacobean mansion housing the greatest collection of Roman artefacts in the north-east.

Tutbury Castle

Tutbury Castle is an imposing medieval site in Staffordshire which had one very famous prisoner, Mary Queen of Scots.

Tyneham Village

Tyneham Village in Dorset was temporarily evacuated in 1943 during the height of WWII so the army could prepare for D-Day, but the residents never returned…

Venta Icenorum

Translated as ‘town of the Iceni’, Venta Icenorum sits in the valley of the River Tas on the outskirts of Caistor St Edmund and was the civitas, or capital city of the Iceni tribe.

Verulamium

Verulamium was a Roman settlement near modern day St Albans in England.

Victoria and Albert Museum

The Victoria and Albert Museum displays millions of works of art from around the world and spans 3,000 years of history.

Vindolanda

Vindolanda was one of the main Ancient Roman wall forts of Hadrian’s Wall in Britain.

Waddon Hill

Waddon Hill is a hill and the site of an old Roman fort near Beaminster, in the English county of Dorset. The name Waddon is from the Old English meaning wheat hill.

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Wales National Roman Legion Museum

The Wales National Roman Legion Museum explores the history and legacy of the Roman Empire’s furthest outpost.

Wall Roman site

The Wall Roman site in Staffordshire houses the ruins of an Ancient Roman inn.

Wallingford Castle

Wallingford Castle was a major medieval castle situated in Wallingford in the English county of Oxfordshire (historically in Berkshire until the 1974 reorganisation), adjacent to the River Thames. Established in the 11th century as a motte-and-bailey design within an Anglo-Saxon burgh, it grew to become what historian Nicholas Brooks has described as "one of the most powerful royal castles of the 12th and 13th centuries". Held for the Empress Matilda during the civil war years of the Anarchy, it survived multiple sieges and was never taken. Over the next two centuries it became a luxurious castle, used by royalty and their immediate family. After being abandoned as a royal residence by Henry VIII, the castle fell into decline. Refortified during the English Civil War, it was eventually slighted, i.e. deliberately destroyed, after being captured by Parliamentary forces after a long siege. The site was subsequently left relatively undeveloped, and the limited remains of the castle walls and the considerable earthworks are now open to the public.

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Warwick Castle

Built by a king, the seat of a kingmaker and vital stronghold in the Wars of the Roses and the English Civil War, Warwick Castle has played an important role in British history.

Watford Museum

This museum is devoted to the history of the local area and that of the town of Watford itself.

Watling Lodge

Watling Lodge was a Roman fortlet on the Antonine Wall in Scotland. It was located near what is now Lock Sixteen on the Forth and Clyde Canal in Falkirk with neighbouring forts at Rough Castle to the west and Falkirk to the east. There was also a fort at Camelon to the north. There was also a Roman temporary camp found a short distance south of the site.

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Wattlesborough Castle

Wattlesborough Tower is a ruined fortified 13th-century manor house or Tower House in Shropshire.

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Welwyn Roman Baths

The Welwyn Roman Baths complex houses the remains of a Roman bathhouse dating back to the 3rd Century AD.

Western Approaches Museum

Take command of the British Navy with a visit to the Western Approaches Bunker and submerse yourself in the history of the decisive Battle of the Atlantic.

Westerwood

Westerwood is an area in the north-east of Cumbernauld in North Lanarkshire, Scotland. Historically it was the site of a Roman Fort of which a video reconstruction has been produced. In the past two decades, new housing developments have been built around the Westerwood Hotel and Golf Course. The golf course, which was designed by Seve Ballesteros and Dave Thomas, is located on the north side of the town, close to Cumbernauld Airport. Westerwood Community Council was set up for local residents and a committee has been appointed. Neighbouring villages which are outside of Cumbernauld include Dullatur to the north-west and Castlecary to the east.

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Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey is an iconic medieval structure and the site of many historic royal events, from coronations and weddings to burials.

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey is a picturesque cliff-top ruin of the 13th century church which belonged to a Benedictine abbey in Yorkshire.

Whitley Castle

This little-known, remote Roman fort in the North Pennines bordering Cumbria and Northumberland is not only the highest stone-built Roman fort in Britain, it has the most complex defensive earthworks of any known fort in the entire Roman Empire.

Whittington Castle

Whittington Castle is a castle in northern Shropshire, England, owned and managed by the Whittington Castle Preservation Fund. The castle was originally a motte-and-bailey castle, but this was replaced in the 13th century by one with buildings around a courtyard whose exterior wall was the curtain wall of the inner bailey. As a castle of the Welsh Marches, it was built on the border of Wales and England very close to the historic fort of Old Oswestry.Whittington Castle resides on a 12-acre (49,000 m2) property in the village of Whittington, in the district of North Shropshire, in the county of Shropshire in England. It abuts Castle Road.In 2003, a historical and archaeological investigation by Peter Brown and Peter King identified that the outer bailey of the castle had been two elaborate gardens and surrounded by water in the 14th century. This discovery was significant in that it proved the advanced state (as compared to those of the French or Flemish) of English gardening habits. The "lavish" garden was installed by one of the FitzWarin family. The viewing mound in the centre may be the oldest of its type yet discovered in England.

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Wilderness Plantation

The line of the Antonine Wall runs roughly parallel between the River Kelvin to the north and the Forth and Clyde Canal to the south.The site, like several others along the wall and beyond, was found by aerial photography, this discovery being reported in October 1965. Following this Wilkes excavated in that year and the following one. He approved of the term "interval fortlet" to describe this and other fortlets like Duntocher and Glasgow Bridge.The neighbouring forts to this fortlet are Balmuildy in the west and Cadder in the east.

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Winchester Cathedral

One of Europe’s great cathedrals, Winchester spans 1,000 years of rich, fascinating history with so much to discover including one of the world’s most exquisite bibles, the 11th century crypt and Jane Austen’s final resting place.

Winchester Palace

Winchester Palace in Southwark was a twelfth-century grand complex which was one of the most important buildings in all of medieval London.

Windsor Castle

Windsor Castle is the oldest occupied castle in the world and the official home of the Queen.

Wisbech Castle

Wisbech Castle is believed to have been a motte-and-bailey earthwork castle built to fortify Wisbech (historically in the Isle of Ely but now in the Fenland District of Cambridgeshire, England) on the orders of William I in 1072. This was probably oval in shape and size, on the line still marked by the Circus. The original design and layout is unknown.

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Wollaton Hall

A classic prodigy house, Wollaton Hall in Nottingham is a spectacular Elizabethan mansion built in the 1580s for Sir Francis Willoughby. It now houses the Nottingham Natural History Museum and was described as ‘the architectural sensation of its age.’

Woodcroft Castle

Woodcroft Castle is a moated medieval castle in the parish of Etton, Cambridgeshire, England.

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Woodstock Palace

Woodstock Palace was a royal residence in the English town of Woodstock, Oxfordshire.Henry I of England built a hunting lodge here and in 1129 he built 7 miles (11 km) of walls to create the first enclosed park, where lions and leopards were kept. The lodge became a palace under Henry's grandson, Henry II, who spent time here with his mistress, Rosamund Clifford.Important events that took place at the palace include:

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Woodwalton Castle

Woodwalton Castle was a small motte and bailey castle at Church End, the northern end of the parish of Woodwalton, Huntingdonshire. Located on a natural hillock, the earthworks of the castle still remain, with an outer moat enclosing a circular bailey with a central motte. A large dyke, apparently ancient, runs from the outer moat in a north-easterly direction. The site is a scheduled ancient monument.

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Wroxeter Roman City

Wroxeter Roman City houses the remains of what was once Roman Britain’s fourth largest city.

Wyre, Orkney

Wyre is one of the Orkney Islands, lying south-east of Rousay. It is 311 hectares (1.20 sq mi) and 32 metres (105 ft) at its highest point. It is one of the smallest inhabited islands in the archipelago.

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York City Walls

The York City Walls are England’s most intact set of city walls and one of the city’s most popular attractions.

York Minster

York Minster is one of the largest gothic cathedrals in northern Europe, built by the Normans and expanded over the centuries.

Yorkshire Museum

The Yorkshire Museum is a true celebration of two thousand years of history of one of the UK’s most beautiful, traditional and influential cities.

Ythan Wells

Ythan Wells, also known as Glenmailen, is the site of a Roman military camp, near the farm of Glenmellan, 2.1 kilometres (1.3 mi) east of the village of Ythanwells in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The site is a designated scheduled monument.Traces of two marching camps have been found at the site. The larger camp, covering some 42 hectares (100 acres) was discovered in 1785 by Col. Alex Shand. A smaller camp, extending to 13 hectares (32 acres) and partially overlapping the area of the first, was discovered by J. K. St Joseph in 1968. This smaller camp predates the larger and has been dated to the campaigns of Agricola.The site is situated at the headwaters of the River Ythan, where a series of natural springs supplies potable water, that was convenient for the large marching camp installed here by the Romans in the first few centuries AD.

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Zouches Manor

Zouches Manor (also Zouches Castle) was an Anglo-Saxon moated manor in Fulbourn Fen, a Site of Special Scientific Interest in the village of Fulbourn, Cambridgeshire, England. It is one of the historic Five Manors of Fulbourn and recorded to have existed 1066 AD to 1539 AD.

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