About Porthcuno Telegraph Museum

The Porthcurno Telegraph Museum is a museum dedicated to the history of telegraphic development and is the site of one of the most historically important communications centres in the UK.

In what would become one of the most ground-breaking events in modern communications, the first trans-Atlantic telegraph cables were laid in the 1870s and came ashore in Porthcurno, as it is the westernmost point in Britain. It was a vital in keeping contact with other parts of the world.

The original cables used binary telegraphy and Porthcurno soon became the busiest (and probably the most important) communications station in the world. From its establishment in the 1870s to its closure in 1970, telegraphy underwent huge changes, and as technology evolved, so Porthcurno became redundant in its original purpose.

Cable and Wireless, who by this time owned the business in Porthcurno, made good use of the buildings as a training school for their workers from around the world. The museum was established when the college was moved in 1993.

One of the most spectacular aspects of the museum is the underground WWII tunnels, from where vital communications between Britain and her allies were run. These caves and tunnels have been left more or less as they were throughout WWII.

Overall, Porthcurno Telegraph Museum is a fascinating place to visit, and has a lot of interactive activities for children (and/or adults) as well as exhibitions on the development of modern communications technology, mobile phones and the internet.

You should allow no less than an hour and a half to explore it.

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