Roman Sites in Derbyshire

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When it comes to Derbyshire's Roman ruins there are a number of fascinating places including Aquae Arnemetiae, Ardotalia and Derventio Coritanorum. There are other fabulous Roman sites in Derbyshire including the Navio Roman Fort, which is one of the best known ancient Roman ruins in Derbyshire. Wherever your travels take you, we've compiled a fantastic selection of Roman Sites in Derbyshire with our editor's picks followed by a few hidden gems.

What are the best Roman Sites in Derbyshire?

1. Aquae Arnemetiae

Aquae Arnemetiae was a small town in the Roman province of Britannia. The settlement was based around its natural warm springs. Today it is the town of Buxton, Derbyshire in England. Aquae Arnemetiae means 'Waters of Arnemetia'. Arnemetia was the Romano-British goddess of the sacred grove (the name Arnemetia was derived from the Celtic for beside the sacred grove). The town was recorded as Aquis Arnemeza in the Ravenna Cosmography's list of all known places in the world in about 700 AD.

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2. Ardotalia

Ardotalia is a Roman fort in Gamesley, near Glossop in Derbyshire, England. Ardotalia was constructed by Cohors Primae Frisiavonum —The First Cohort of Frisiavones. Evidence for the existence of this unit exists not only from the building stone found at the site but also from various diplomas and other Roman writings. The site is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. As of 2020, it is on the Heritage at Risk Register.

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3. Derventio Coritanorum

Derventio was a small town in the Roman province of Britannia. Today the area is known as Little Chester, on the outskirts of Derby, located in the English county of Derbyshire.

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4. Navio Roman Fort

Navio Roman fort overlooks a tight bend of the River Noe at Brough-on-Noe near Hope, Derbyshire, in England. Navio fort and vicus is a Scheduled Monument. The town was recorded as Nauione in the Ravenna Cosmography's list of all known places in the world in about 700 AD. The Centurial stone found at Navio dates from the rebuilding of the fort in 154 CE by occupying soldiers from southwest France. Excavations in the 1990s determined that the vicus extended further east beyond Bradwell Brook. In 2019 excavations of the vicus uncovered foundations from stone and timber buildings. The team also found many pottery fragments, carved stone pieces, coins and a ‘ballista ball’.

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Our database of ancient Roman ruins in Derbyshire is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. So, if you know of other Roman Sites in Derbyshire, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by contacting us today.