Historic Sites in Turkey

If you’re looking to discover historic sites in Turkey then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s a fantastic selection of  historic sites in Turkey and you can plan some great things to see on your trips by browsing our selection. Once you’ve explored the historic sites in Turkey you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan out your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook.

Our database of historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other historic sites in Turkey, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.


Top Historic Destinations in Turkey: Historic Sites in Istanbul

Turkey: Site Index

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Aizanoi

Aizanoi houses ancient Roman ruins including a stadium, gymnasium, theatre and an impressive Temple of Zeus.

Aizanoi is a Turkish archaeological site housing mostly Roman remains from this ancient city’s peak in the second and third centuries AD. Amongst its ruins, Aizanoi has five ancient and still used bridges, two Turkish-style baths, column-lined promenades, a stadium, a gymnasium, a theatre and its great Temple of Zeus.... Read More

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Alanya Castle

With Hellenistic foundations, this magnificent Seljuk ruin sits atop a 250m high peninsular overlooking the Mediterranean sea.

Alanya Castle is a magnificent Seljuk ruin which sits atop a 250-metre high peninsular overlooking the Mediterranean sea. With walls stretching over 6km, Alanya Castle – sometimes called Alanya Fortress – encloses a number of fascinating sites and structures which are well worth exploring today. The origins of the city today... Read More

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Alanya Citadel

Part of Alanya Castle, the Citadel (or Ickale) dates back to the 6th century and offers magnificent views.

The Alanya Citadel (or Ickale) dates back to the 6th century AD and is the oldest part of the Alanya Castle complex. Most of the fortifications you can see today date to the 13th century. Inside the Citadel are the remains of Seljuk cisterns, the palace of Sultan Alaaddin Keykubat, the ruins... Read More

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Anadolu Hisari

Anadolu Hisari was built by the Ottoman Sultan Beyazid I in 1395.

Anadolu Hisari (Anadoluhisari), translated as the Anatolian Castle, was built by the great grandfather of Mehmet the Conqueror, Sultan Beyazid I in 1395. Anadolu Hisari is not open to the public. However the fifteenth century Rumeli Fortress, which sits just across the Bosporus, is open to tourists.... Read More

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Antalya Museum

The Antalya Museum contains thousands of ancient and prehistoric artifacts.

The Antalya Museum (Antalya Muzesi) is an archaeological museum in one of Turkey’s most popular resorts. It contains thousands of ancient and prehistoric artifacts and good explanations of their history. It is one of Turkey’s largest museums. The pieces at the Antalya Museum come from a variety of sites around Turkey... Read More

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Anzac Cove

Anzac Cove was the landing site for Australian and New Zealand troops in the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I.

Anzac Cove in Turkey’s Gallipoli Peninsula was the site where Australian and New Zealander troops landed on 25 April 1915. The Anzac Cove landings were part of the Gallipoli Campaign, an effort by the Commonwealth and by the French to remove Turkey from World War I. In fact, the troops were... Read More

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Aphrodisias

The ancient city of Aphrodisias was named after the Goddess of Love; Aphrodite. Established in what is now modern day Turkey in the 6th century BC, it expanded into the thriving capital of the surrounding region.

Aphrodisias was once a thriving Hellenic and Roman city in what is now modern day Turkey. Today it is an archaeological site, whose ruins include the remains of a beautiful ancient stadium. Established during the late Hellenistic period, Aphrodisias became a prosperous city under Roman rule from the 1st to the... Read More

Ari Burnu Cemetery

Ari Burnu Cemetery is a World War I Commonwealth cemetery in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey.

Ari Burnu Cemetery in Gallipoli in Turkey was originally established in 1915, during the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I. It houses the graves of 252 Commonwealth soldiers who died during the eight month attempt to remove Turkey from the war. Of these graves, 42 are unidentified. Ari Burnu Cemetery... Read More

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Aspendos Roman Theatre

Aspendos Roman Theatre is a large and beautifully preserved Ancient Roman site in Turkey.

Aspendos Roman Theatre is a beautifully preserved Ancient Roman site in Turkey. In fact, it seems to be almost completely intact. Still able to seat up to 15,000 people this Roman amphitheatre was once part of the city of Aspendos, which was founded by Ancient Greeks from Argos and... Read More

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Assos

The city of Assos was founded by Ancient Greeks from the 7th century BC. The ancient ruined city is crowned by an impressive temple dedicated to the Goddess Athena.

The city of Assos on the Aegean coast of modern Turkey was founded by Ancient Greeks sometime around the 7th century BC. Today the site, whose modern name is Behramkale, is a beautiful seaside resort littered with ancient ruins dating from the ancient Greek and Roman periods. The city passed through... Read More

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Beylerbeyi Palace

Beylerbeyi Palace is a nineteenth century palace built to house important guests.

Beylerbeyi Palace (Beylerbeyi Sarayi) was built during the reign of Sultan Abdulaziz in the 1860s. Serving as the residence of visiting dignitaries, Beylerbeyi Palace has played host to kings, shahs and princesses. It was also at Beylerbeyi Palace that sultan Abdulhamid II was kept captive for six years... Read More

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Bodrum Castle

Bodrum Castle is a 15th century citadel built by Christian knights and houses the Museum of Underwater Archaeology.

Bodrum Castle (Bodrum Kalesi), also known as The Castle of St. Peter, in Bodrum, Turkey was built by the Knights Hospitaller in 1402 in order to offer protection from the invading Seljuk Turks. Constructed according to the highest standards at the time, it remained an important Christian stronghold for over a... Read More

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Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology

The Museum of Underwater Archaeology in Bodrum exhibits treasures from underwater excavations including one of the earliest shipwrecks ever found.

The Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology in Turkey exhibits historical treasures uncovered through underwater excavations. Some of the treasures at the Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology include the finds from the Bronze Age Uluburun Shipwreck, believed to have sunk in 14th century BC and discoveries from a 5th century ship, most... Read More

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Cappadocia Underground Cities

The Cappadocia Underground Cities are incredible Christian subterranean fortified cities in Turkey protected by UNESCO.

The Cappadocia Underground Cities, found mostly in the Nevsehir region in central Turkey, are a series of magnificent subterranean cities built by the Troglodytes or ‘cave goers’. Of the almost forty known Cappadocia underground cities, some in Nevshir are open to the public, including Kaymaklı, Derinkuyu, Özkonak, Mazi and Ürgüp. These... Read More

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Carrhae Battlefield

Carrhae Battlefield was the setting for one of the most crushing Roman defeats, inflicted at the hands of the Parthians.

Carrhae Battlefield near the modern town of Harran in Turkey was the setting for one of the most crushing Roman defeats, inflicted at the hands of the Parthians. The battle took place in May 53 BC and was the culmination of a Roman invasion of Parthia, led by the wealthy Roman... Read More

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Catalhoyuk

Catalhoyuk is the site of an important Neolithic town in Turkey.

Catalhoyuk is the site of a Neolithic town in Turkey dating back to between 7400 and 6000 BC. Containing some of the earliest ever known mural art, Catalhoyuk is considered to be vital in learning about the country’s origins. Catalhoyuk also has a visitor centre with exhibits, although most... Read More

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Church of Saint Nicholas, Myra

One of the oldest surviving churches in the world, this church and museum looks at the life of Saint Nicholas, aka Santa Claus.

The Church of Saint Nicholas at Myra - also called St Nicholas Museum - is an ancient Byzantine church which charts the life of this famous Christian Saint and is one of the oldest surviving churches in existence. Saint Nicholas was born in Patara in the 3rd Century AD, and is... Read More

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Derinkuyu Underground City

Derinkuyu Underground City is the most famous of the Cappadocia subterranean cities built by early Christians and protected by UNESCO.

Derinkuyu Underground City is the largest and most popular of the Cappadocia underground cities in Nevsehir, Turkey. As with the other underground cities in this region, Derinkuyu was built by early Christians to escape religious persecution. The result is an astounding network of subterranean houses and communal facilities, including food... Read More

Didyma

Didyma in Turkey contains the ruins of the temple of Apollo, which was one of the most important oracles of the Hellenic world.

The archaeological site of Didyma in Turkey contains the remains of the ancient Sanctuary of Apollo, one of the most important oracles of the Hellenic world. The oracle, second only to Delphi in importance, was linked to the Greek city of Miletus by the 17km long Sacred Way and the site... Read More

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Dolmabahce Palace

Dolmabahce Palace is an opulent nineteenth century palace which twice served as the seat of the Ottoman Empire.

Dolmabahce Palace (Dolmabahce Sarayi) is an opulent nineteenth century palace on the Bosphorus which twice served as the seat of the Ottoman Empire. Begun in 1842 under Sultan Abdulmecit I, Dolmabahce Palace was completed in 1853 and first became the base of the Ottoman Empire as well as the home... Read More

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Ephesus

Ephesus in Turkey represents some of the best preserved Greek and Roman ruins in the Mediterranean.

Ephesus or "Efes" was a vibrant classical city, now bordering modern day Selçuk in Turkey and representing some of the best preserved Greek and Roman ruins in the Mediterranean.  Thought to have been founded in the 10th century BC by an Athenian prince named Androklos, Ephesus grew into a thriving city... Read More

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Galata Tower

Galata Tower is a medieval turreted tower first built by the Genoese in 1348.

Galata Tower is a medieval turreted tower built by the Genoese as a defensive structure in 1348 and since rebuilt several times. One such occasion was following an earthquake in 1509 which caused great damage to Galata Tower. Known by the Genoese as the Tower of Christ (Christea Turris),... Read More

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Gaziantep Zeugma Mosaic Museum

This astonishing museum features thousands of square feet of lovingly restored mosaics from the Roman town of Zeugma.

Forming part of the Gaziantep Museum of Archaeology, the Zeugma Mosaic Museum contains a superb collection of lovingly restored mosaics from the ancient Roman town of Zeugma. The museum itself is an impressive modern construction and a great many of the artefacts it features were excavated from ancient Zeugma, which... Read More

Gemiler Island

A tiny island located just off the Turkish mainland, Gemiler Island is packed with Byzantine remains including a number of ancient churches.

Beautifully situated in a mountain-girt bay, Gemiler Island is packed with c.1,500 year old Byzantine remains. The island, just 1km long, has been surveyed by Japanese archaeologists who have revealed the existence of a thriving small town clinging to the northern shore. Unlike the classical cities of the region, there... Read More

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Gobekli Tepe

Göbekli Tepe is a fascinating Neolithic site said to be home to the oldest temple in the World.

Six thousand years older than Stonehenge, seven thousand years older than the Great Pyramids and a thousand older than the walls of Jericho, formerly believed to be the world’s most ancient monumental structure, Göbekli Tepe in south-eastern Turkey close to the city of Sanliurfa has literally rewritten human history. Thanks to... Read More

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Gordion

Gordion is an ancient Phrygian city which today contains the astounding burial mound said to belong to King Midas.

Gordion, also spelt Gordium, in the modern Turkish village of Yassıhöyük is home to what is popularly said to be the tomb of the famous King Midas. This ancient city was once the capital of the Phrygian Empire, who ruled the region from roughly 1200BC-700BC. Founded in an important strategic location... Read More

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Goreme Open Air Museum

Located in the picturesque Goreme Valley, Goreme’s open air museum is one of the most accessible ways to explore the region's ancient rock-cut churches.

The Goreme Open Air Museum in Cappadocia includes a collection of around 30 ancient churches, and feels about as far from a traditional museum as it’s possible to get. Easily accessible to visitors, the Goreme valley was the first historical site to be discovered in Cappadocia. The roughly cut rock churches... Read More

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Hadrian’s Gate

Hadrian’s Gate is an Ancient Roman monument in Antalya built in honour of the Emperor Hadrian.

Hadrian’s Gate is an Ancient Roman monument in Antalya built in honour of the Emperor Hadrian. Hadrian was one of the most famous and important Roman Emperor's and ruled from 117 - 138 AD. He famously travelled far and wide across his empire, and spent far more time in the provinces... Read More

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Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia is a world famous sixth century church turned mosque in Istanbul.

The Hagia Sophia, or ‘Ayasofya’ in Turkish, is a world famous sixth century church turned mosque in Istanbul, which now operates as a museum. Whilst the original Hagia Sofia was built in the fourth century AD by Constantine the Great, very little remains of this structure nor the one built... Read More

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Hagia Sophia, Trabzon

A thirteenth century church, a fifteenth century mosque and a twentieth century museum, the Trabzon Hagia Sophia has a fascinating history and boasts a wealth of ancient art and frescoes.

The historic Hagia Sophia in Trabzon, Turkey, is an impressive 13th century Byzantine church which now operates as a museum boasting a range of fascinating ancient frescoes. Originally constructed under the direction of Trebizond Emperor Manuel I between 1238 and 1263 AD, the Hagia Sophia was originally built to serve as... Read More

Haidar Pasha Cemetery

The Haidar Pasha Cemetery in Turkey is the final resting place of thousands of Crimean War soldiers.

The Haidar Pasha Cemetery near Istanbul, Turkey was the burial site of approximately 6,000 soldiers who died during the Crimean War at the Selimiye Barracks, a then British military base and hospital. It is maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Conditions at the Selimiye Barracks were terrible at the beginning... Read More

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Hatay Museum

Hatay Museum in Antakya explores the history of the famous ancient city of Antioch. Among a host of other artefacts is a collection of exquisite Roman mosaics.

Hatay Museum in Antakya, Turkey, is a fascinating institution dedicated to the history of the famous ancient city of Antioch. Antioch is now known as Antakya, in the province of Hatay, which borders on Syria. The ancient city was the capital of the historic Kingdom of Hatay, and, along with Rome,... Read More

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Hattusha

Hattusha is one of Turkey’s great ruins of the capitals of the Hittite Empire and is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Hattusha (also known as Hattusa or Hattuşa) is one of Turkey’s great ruins of capitals of the Hittite Empire and is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site. The Hittite Empire reached its peak in the second millennium BC, most prominently in the thirteenth century BC, at which time much of... Read More

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Hierapolis

Hierapolis was once a thriving, multicultural ancient city and spa, the remains of which can now be seen in modern day Turkey.

Hierapolis was once a thriving, multicultural ancient city and spa, the remains of which can now be seen in modern day Turkey. It is said to have been founded by the rulers of Pergamum, the Attalid Dynasty, and is usually attributed to their King Eumenes II (197BC-159BC). However, it is... Read More

Hill 60 Cemetery

The Hill 60 Cemetery is a Commonwealth World War I military cemetery in Gallipoli.

The Hill 60 Cemetery in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey is a Commonwealth Graves Commission burial site for 788 soldiers who died during the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I. The Hill 60 Cemetery is located on the site of the Battle of Hill 60. The Gallipoli Campaign was an eight... Read More

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Ihlara Valley

The Ihlara Valley is famous for a number of rock-carved ancient churches known for their ornate frescoes depicting biblical events.

The Ihlara Valley near the historic heart of Cappadocia, in central Turkey, is famous for both its natural beauty and for a number of rock-carved ancient churches and dwellings known for their ornate frescoes depicting biblical events. The valley was probably first inhabited in the 4th century AD, initially by hermits... Read More

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Istanbul Archaeology Museum

The Istanbul Archaeology Museum houses around a million artefacts from an impressive range of cultures and periods.

The Istanbul Archaeology Museum (İstanbul Arkeoloji Müzeleri) houses around a million artefacts from an impressive range of cultures and periods, including some of the world’s most remarkable pieces. Split between three buildings - the main archaeology museum, the Ancient Orient Museum and the Tiled Kiosk Museum - the Istanbul Archaeology... Read More

Istanbul Maritime Museum

The Istanbul Maritime Museum exhibits a variety of ships, weapons, works of art and artifacts relating to Turkey’s naval history.

The Istanbul Maritime Museum (Istanbul Deniz Muzesi) exhibits a variety of ships, weapons, works of art and artifacts relating to Turkey’s naval history. Among the exhibitions on display in the Istanbul Maritime Museum are collections highlighting ship design and weaponary, naval uniforms, navigational instruments and artwork focusing on naval themes.... Read More

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Istanbul Mosaic Museum

The Istanbul Mosaic Museum contains the amazing remains of mosaics excavated the Great Palace of Constantinople built during the Byzantine period.

The Istanbul Mosaic Museum, located near Sultanahmet Square in Istanbul, contains the amazing remains of mosaics excavated from the courtyard of the Great Palace of Constantinople. First discovered in 1933 and later fully excavated in the 1950s, the mosaic floors were found under the modern Arasta Bazaar and now form the... Read More

Kabatepe Museum

Kabatepe Museum in Turkey is dedicated to the Gallipoli Campaign of World War I.

The Kabatepe Simulation Center or Kabatepe Museum in Gallipoli in Turkey is houses a collection of historic items relating to the Gallipoli Campaign of World War I. The Gallipoli Campaign saw French and Commonwealth forces engage in a war with Turkey – then the Ottoman Empire - in order to remove... Read More

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Kaunos

Kaunos contains the remains of an ancient Carian city and includes a host of Hellenic, Roman and Byzantine remains – particularly its impressive theatre.

Kaunos archaeological site in Turkey contains the remains of this ancient city which has witnessed the rise and fall of several empires, cultures and civilisations over almost 3,000 years of history. Though not as spectacular as many ancient cities in Turkey, it has the advantage of being quieter, tranquil and... Read More

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Kayakoy

The abandoned town of Kayakoy bears witness to the 1920s population swap between Greece and Turkey. Today visitors can explore this deserted town, including its houses and churches.

The curious deserted town of Kayakoy in Turkey bears witness to an early 20th century upheaval that saw hundreds of thousands of people uprooted in a population swap between Greece and Turkey which followed the Greco-Turkish War (1919-1922). Abandoned and ignored for almost a hundred years, the site was saved from... Read More

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Kaymaklı Underground City

Kaymaklı Underground City is a large subterranean city in central Turkey built by early Christians and part of a UNESCO site.

Kaymaklı Underground City is one of the most famous of the Cappadocia underground cities in the Nevsehir province of central Turkey. Built by early Christians to protect them from religious persecution, Kaymaklı Underground City is an elaborate labyrinth of tunnels and caves and is probably the widest of the... Read More

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Kizilkule

Part of Alanya Castle, the Kizilkule or Red Tower was built in 1226 and stands 29 meters high.

One of the most impressive elements of Alanya Castle is the Kizilkule, or Red Tower. Commissioned in 1226 and standing 29 meters high, it served its purpose as a defensive measure to stop the harbour from sea-born attack. Located in the tower is a museum displaying works of art from the... Read More

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Knidos

The picturesque remains of the ancient city of Knidos are a popular tourist attraction, as much for the beautiful coastal views as for the archaic ruins.

The remains of the ancient Greek city of Knidos, near the modern Turkish town of Datça, are among the most picturesque historic attractions in the region. Perched upon a steep hilltop, looking out over its natural harbour, Knidos boasts stunning views alongside its ancient ruins. Founded by Greek settlers, Knidos was... Read More

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Laodikeia

Laodikeia was an Ancient Greek then Roman city, which is now represented by a set of ruins.

Laodikeia, also known as Laodicea, was an Ancient Greek then Roman city, which is now represented by a set of interesting ancient ruins. Said by some to have been founded by Antiochus II Theos of the Seleucid Kingdom in the third century BC, many of the buildings and monuments at the Laodikeia... Read More

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Lone Pine Cemetery

Lone Pine Cemetery is a Commonwealth graveyard for soldiers who died during the Gallipoli Campaign of World War I and also a battle site.

Lone Pine Cemetery in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey is the final resting place of 1,167 Commonwealth troops, 504 unidentified, who fought in the Gallipoli Campaign, an eight month effort during World War I to remove the Ottoman Empire from the war. Named after a single tree that grew there and... Read More

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Lone Pine Memorial

The Lone Pine Memorial commemorates Anzac soldiers who died during the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I.

The Lone Pine Memorial in Gallipoli in Turkey commemorates over 4,900 New Zealand and Australian soldiers who perished in the Anzac area and who have no known grave during the Gallipoli Campaign of World War I. The Gallipoli Campaign involved troops from throughout the Commonwealth and from France. It was an... Read More

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Mausoleum of Mausolus

The Mausoleum of Mausolus was one of the most impressive tombs of its time, but has since been entirely destroyed.

The Mausoleum of Mausolus, also called the Mausoleion, was once the magnificent tomb of the Caria ruler and eldest son of Hecatomnus, Mausolus. Built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus, which is now modern day Bodrum in Turkey, the Mausoleum of Mausolus was such an impressive structure that the... Read More

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Miletus

Miletus was an important ancient Greek then Roman city, which still has an impressive theatre, but relatively few other ruins.

Miletus was an important ancient Greek then Roman city, which still boasts an impressive ancient theatre among its ruins. With a history thought to date back as far as the 16th, perhaps even the 17th, century BC, Miletus eventually became a thriving hub from the 8th to 7th centuries BC until... Read More

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Museum of Anatolian Civilizations

With a collection spanning around 10,000 years housed in two magnificent Ottoman buildings, the Museum of Anatolian Civilizations is a must-see for any visitor to Ankara.

The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations was the first museum to be established in Ankara in 1921, and over 90 years later it still stands at the heart of the city as a top tourist attraction. Located on the south side of Ankara Castle, artefacts are housed in the historical... Read More

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Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts

The Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts is a site through which visitors can explore both the cultural and political history of Turkey.

The Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts hosts a rich collection of artistic artefacts that can cater for everyone from an interested amateur to a seasoned expert. Wandering through the Ottoman Palace in which the museum is housed, visitors can see remarkable examples of Islamic calligraphy, tiles, rugs and one of... Read More

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Myra

Myra has one of the best-preserved collections of ancient ruins, and is a perfect place to experience an illustrious period of Greek and Roman history being brought back to life.

The ancient town of Myra in Lycia gives a unique insight into Turkey’s history and the many different civilisations which influenced the area. Today a collection of mostly Roman ruins remain which give visitors the opportunity to envisage the bustling centre that is thought to have been established up to 2,500... Read More

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Nemrut

Nemrut in Turkey is the site of the eminently impressive 1st century BC tomb of King Antiochus I Epiphanes.

Nemrut is the site of the eminently impressive first century BC mountain-top tomb of King Antiochus I Epiphanes. Also known as or Nemrud or as Mount Nemrut (Nemrut Dağı in Turkish), the site is famed for its 10-metre-high statues depicting various heads, both mythical and real in nature. Antiochus may have been... Read More

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Olympos

Olympos is truly a stunning destination, a playground for pirates; these ancient ruins tell a story that blurs the line between myth and reality.

Nestled amongst undisturbed white beaches and plush, tropical forest terrain, the trek to discover the ruins of ancient Olympos is an adventure in itself. Vibrant with wildlife and greenery the site, originally attracting exclusively backpackers, is now popular with couples and families alike. Dating back far into antiquity, Olympos had risen... Read More

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Ozkonak Underground City

Ozkonak is one of many examples of an underground city in Cappadocia which was carved into the mountains in ancient times. It is smaller but far quieter than many of the other underground cities in the region.

Özkonak Underground City in Cappadocia is one of several ancient settlements which were carved out of solid rock in late antiquity to provide shelter and defence in times of trouble. As much a city carved into the hillside as a city dug underground, Özkonak is smaller but quieter than many... Read More

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Patara

Patara not only has a rich and varied history, the former Lycian port town is situated in a beautiful corner of Turkey, alongside a 20km long white sand beach.

Located on the Mediterranean coast, and boasting a beautiful white sand beach, the ruins of ancient Patara nestle behind the sand dunes and combine that truly idyllic mix of sun, sea and wonderful history. This ancient city was originally a Lycian settlement and then served as an important naval base during... Read More

Pergamum

Pergamum was a thriving ancient Greek then Roman city, home to famous sites such as its Asclepion, theatre and library.

Pergamum, which is also spelt Pergamon, is a famous archaeological site in Turkey which developed under the Attalid dynasty following the death of Alexander the Great. When Alexander died, one of his generals, Lysimachus, took control of the region. When Lysimachus died in 281BC, Pergamum and the surrounding area fell... Read More

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Perge

Perge is a Turkish archaeological site containing mostly Roman ruins, but has a history dating back to Ancient Greece.

The ancient city of Perge near Antalya in Turkey is now an impressive archaeological site containing a wealth of ancient ruins, mostly dating back to the Roman period, though the city itself has a history dating back well into antiquity. The current city is said to have been founded in circa... Read More

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Phaselis

Phaselis is an exquisite ancient site, where the ruins lie scattered amongst pine trees and the beautiful Mediterranean coast.

The ruins of Phaselis lie to the west of Antalya on Turkey’s Mediterranean coast, boasting a beautiful contrast of a mountain backdrop and an attractive white sand beach. The site is distinguishable by three natural harbours, and is located in the Olympos National Park. Phaselis is said to have been founded... Read More

Priene

Priene is a quiet, picturesque ancient Greek city in Turkey which boasts some amazing historical remains without the crowds of the nearby sites.

Priene is an ancient Greek city which lies between the popular holiday resorts of Kusadasi and Bodrum. It is one of many important ancient sites in the area and is close to both Miletus and Ephesus. However, though smaller than other nearby historical attractions, the real charm of Priene lies in... Read More

Quinn’s Post Cemetery

Quinn’s Post Cemetery is a World War I Commonwealth cemetery in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey.

Quinn’s Post Cemetery is a Commonwealth World War I graveyard for those killed during the Gallipoli Campaign. Quinn’s Post was a vital strategic point for the New Zealand and Australian forces which saw fierce fighting throughout the eight month Gallipoli Campaign. Quinn’s Post was named after Major Hugh Quinn of the... Read More

Rumeli Fortress

The Rumeli Fortress was built by Mehmet the Conqueror as part of his campaign to capture Constantinople.

The Rumeli Fortress (Rumelihisari) was built by the Ottoman Sultan Mehmet II in 1452. At the time, Mehmet was preparing to lay siege to Constantinople, trying to conquer it from the Byzantines. He built the Rumeli Fortress as a way of blocking the city’s supplies. Over 3,000 people toiled to create... Read More

Sagalassos

Sagalassos is an active archaeological site in southwest Turkey which contains mostly Hellenistic and Ancient Roman ruins, some of them very well preserved.

Sagalassos is an active archaeological site in southwest Turkey which contains mostly Hellenistic and Ancient Roman historic ruins, some of them very well preserved. In particular, the Fountain of Antoninler at Sagalassos still has its pretty facade. There are also the remains of a 9,000 seat theatre, a council hall... Read More

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Side Ruins and Museum

Impressive ruins and a fascinating museum, Side hosts a wealth of Graeco-Roman remains and the impressive amphitheatre is a particular highlight.

The ruins of ancient Side are among of the most spectacular that remain in the modern world and showcase hundreds of years of Greek life in the Roman Empire. Its coastal location made Side a desirable trading port and, despite the prominence of piracy, Greek settlers flocked to the city around... Read More

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Simena

The ruins of Simena are spread along beautiful beaches and submerged under crystal clear waters. Enjoy spectacular views from the crusader castle or explore an authentic Lycian Necropolis.

The remains of ancient Simena, now modern Kaleköy in the Kekova region, form one of the most impressive historical places in Turkey. The city’s striking crusader castle combines with a wealth of partly submerged ancient ruins and the beautiful Mediterranean waters to produce a truly inspiring place to explore. Indeed, it... Read More

St Savior in Chora

St Savior in Chora is an eleventh century church turned mosque and, more recently, a museum known as Kariye Muzesi.

St Savior in Chora (Kariye Camii) is an eleventh century church turned mosque and, more recently, a museum known as Kariye Muzesi (Chora Museum). Originally built within a Christian complex outside the boundary of Constantinople’s walls, St Savior in Chora derived its name from its countryside setting, "in... Read More

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Sumela Monastery

A 13th century monastery nestled into the cliff-face of the Zigana Mountains, this picturesque Byzantine monastery is located in a scenic, mountainous setting.

Perched on the edge of a sheer cliff-face 300 meters high in the heart of beautiful Altindere National Park, stands Sumela Monastery, a picturesque Byzantine monastery dedicated to the Virgin Mary. According to tradition the monastery was founded by Barnabas and Sophranius, two Athenian priests who visited the region during the... Read More

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Termessos

Nestled on the slopes of the Güllük Mountain the majestic ruins of the ancient city of Termessos are surrounded by outstanding natural beauty.

Located high in the mountains at Güllük National Park, the picturesque city of Termessos is perhaps one of the best preserved Roman/Hellenistic ruins in Turkey. Founded by the Solyms, an ancient Anataolian community, the early history of the inhabitants of this city is relatively obscure, however it is known that the... Read More

Photo by Historvius

The Basilica Cistern

The Basilica Cistern is an underground wonder and one of Istanbul’s best Byzantine sites.

The Basilica Cistern (Yerebatan Saray) is a subterranean wonder and one of the greatest - and certainly the biggest - of Istanbul’s surviving Byzantine sites. With its imposing columns, grand scale and mysterious ambience, this subterranean site seems like a flooded palace, but it is in fact a former water... Read More

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The Blue Mosque

The Blue Mosque was the ambitious creation of a young sultan and would become one of Istanbul’s most iconic sites.

The Blue Mosque was the ambitious creation of a young sultan and would become one of Istanbul’s most iconic sites. Begun in 1606, the Blue Mosque is actually called the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) after the ruler who commissioned it, Sultan Ahmet I. Then not yet twenty... Read More

The Canakkale Martyrs Memorial

The Canakkale Martyrs Memorial commemorates the Turkish soldiers who died in the Gallipoli Campaign.

The Canakkale Martyrs Memorial, also known as Şehitler Abidesi, is a Turkish monument to the 253,000 Turkish soldiers who died in the Gallipoli Campaign. This campaign, known in Turkey as the Canakkale Wars, took place in Turkey’s Gallipoli Peninsula. It was launched on 25 April 1915 by the Commonwealth and the... Read More

The Florence Nightingale Museum

The Florence Nightingale Museum in Turkey gives a glimpse into the work and hospital of the Lady of the Lamp.

The Florence Nightingale Museum in Üsküdar in Istanbul is located in the Selimiye Barracks, the Turkish army barracks which served as a British military base and hospital from 1854 to 1856, during the Crimean War. It was at the Selimiye Barracks, then known as the Scutari Barracks, that the English nurse... Read More

The Helles Memorial

The Helles Memorial commemorates Commonwealth and French casualties from the Gallipoli Campaign.

The Helles Memorial in Cape Helles in Turkey is a vast obelisk monument commemorating the tens of thousands of those who died in the Gallipoli Campaign, particularly those with no known grave. The Gallipoli Campaign, brainchild of Winston Churchill, was an effort by the Commonwealth and the French during the First... Read More

The Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial

The Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial in Turkey commemorates the missing New Zealand soldiers who fought in the Battle of Hill 60 in 1915.

The Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey is a monument to the New Zealand soldiers who died in the Battle of Hill 60 and who have no known grave. The Battle of Hill 60 was a successful attack by Commonwealth forces to capture this hill from... Read More

Topkapı Palace

Topkapı Palace is a fifteenth century former residence of the Ottoman Sultans and a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Topkapı Palace (Topkapi Sarayi) was the seat and residence of the sultans of the Ottoman Empire. Construction of Topkapı Palace began in 1459 under the orders of Sultan Mehmed II following the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. Built in a traditional Ottoman style, Topkapi Palace measured a staggering... Read More

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Troy

Troy is a world-renowned archaeological site, inhabited since the 4th millennium BC and believed to the have been the location of the famous Trojan War.

Troy or “Truva” is one of the most famous and historically significant sites in the world. Located in modern day Turkey, the site marks the meeting place of Anatolia, the Aegean and the Balkans, making it a vitally important source of information about the historic relationships between these regions. Imbued with... Read More

Van Castle

Van Castle was built in the Iron Age as part of the Urartu Kingdom and now stands as a stunning ruin in modern Turkey.

Van Castle (Van Kalesi) was an Iron Age castle which now stands as a stunning ruin on the rocks to the west of the modern city of Van. It was constructed as part of the Urartu Kingdom in the ninth century BC. Upon the fall of this kingdom in the... Read More

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Yedikule Zindanlari

Yedikule Zindanlari is an impressive Byzantine and medieval fort in Istanbul.

Yedikule Zindanlari, also known as the Yedikule Fortress or the Castle of the Seven Towers, is an impressive Byzantine and medieval fort in Istanbul. Originally part of the Theodosian Wall, built by Theodosius II in the fifth century, Yedikule Fortress was added to over the centuries, including by Mehmet... Read More

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Yildiz Palace Museum

Built in the 1880s as a hilltop sultanate retreat, the vast 123 acre Yildiz Palace complex overlooks the mighty Bosphorus and is a stunning example of 19th century Ottoman architecture.

Yildiz (‘Star’) Palace in the Beşiktaş district of Istanbul was built on a hilltop overlooking the Bosphorus river during the reign of the reclusive Ottoman Sultan Abdülhamid II and was used ostensibly as his residence, retreat and harem (which had steel doors!) There had been an imperial estate on the... Read More

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Zelve Open Air Museum

Spread out over three monastic valleys, Zelve, around 10km from Göreme on the Avanos road is a visually stunning town of homes and churches carved into the rocks and it was continually inhabited from the ninth century until as recently as 1952.

Zelve Open Air Museum in the Cappadocia region is one of the most visually stunning historical sites in Turkey. Originally a Byzantine-era (9th century) monastery, it is reputed to be both one of the earliest settled and last-abandoned monasteries in the entire region. The ‘museum’ houses the oldest known examples... Read More

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Zeugma

The remains of this important Roman city are under excavation in Turkey. Though not open to the public, many finds from the site can be seen in the Gaziantep Zeugma Mosaic Museum.

Zeugma was one of the most important cities of the Roman Empire in the East. Originally founded around 300 BC by one of Alexander’s successors, his general Seleucus Nicator, the city was a vital trading point across the Euphrates River. The military and commercial importance of Zeugma led to major growth... Read More