Historic Sites in South Africa

What are the best Historic Sites in South Africa?

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There's a host of top Historic Sites in South Africa to visit and among the very best are District Six, Castle of Good Hope and Isandlwana Battlefield. Other popular sites tend to include Rorke’s Drift , Majuba Hill and Laing’s Nek Battlefield.

We’ve put together an experts guide to South African cultural locations and monuments, with our top ten places to visit as well as a full list of Historic Sites in South Africa, which shouldn’t be ignored if you have the time.

1. District Six Museum

District Six was a once lively, multicultural area of Cape Town unitl it was declared a white only area during Apartheid. It is now a barren landscape and an evocative reminder of the country’s divided history. There’s not much to see in District Six itself today, but to understand the true tragedy of the time the nearby District Six Museum is jammed packed full of information. 

Telling the story of those who lived through this time, visitors can explore how a neighbourhood which was once an outstanding example of communities co-existing and flourishing became a terrible story of Apartheid in practice. Other exhibitions include one specifically looking at local and international football, focusing on apartheid and its effects on the sport and the lives of the people that played the beautiful game.

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2. Castle of Good Hope

The Castle of Good Hope in Cape Town is the oldest surviving colonial building in South Africa and the current seat of the military in the Cape.

Visitors can either explore the Castle of Good Hope independently or join one of the many tours which uncover the Castle’s extensive history including a fascinating (if slightly creepy) visit to a dungeon.

There are also a number of exhibitions, including the Castle Military Museum exploring past battles and wars, the William Ferh Collection of period paintings and furniture and a replica of the original Castle Forge.

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3. Apartheid Museum

The Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg chronicles the history of apartheid in South Africa and the struggle for human rights which ended this regime of racial segregation.

Through its twenty-two exhibition areas, comprising original artefacts, information panels and multimedia presentations including films, the Apartheid Museum provides an in-depth insight into life under the apartheid regime. It also looks at the gradual campaign against the apartheid and the struggle for equal rights led by Nelson Mandela, the country’s eventual president.

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4. Robben Island

Robben Island, off the coast of Cape Town in South Africa was a notorious prison, best known for its internment of political prisoners during South African apartheid. Its most famous prisoner - prisoner 466/64 - was Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid activist who would later become the country’s president.

Today, Robben Island is a UNESCO World Heritage historic site and a museum. A visit to Robben Island is by way of a standardised 3.5 hour guided tour (time includes two 30min ferry rides).

In addition to touring the maximum security prison buildings, the tour includes a 45 minute guided bus ride around the island and interaction with a former Robben Island prisoner. A visit to Robben Island provides a fascinating insight into the island’s history and that of South Africa. It is worth noting however that tours can get fairly crowded.

There are also exhibits at the Nelson Mandela Gateway museum, worth seeing, especially if you can’t make it to the Island.

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5. Isandlwana Battlefield

Isandlwana Battlefield in South Africa was the site of the Battle of Isandlwana during the Anglo-Zulu Wars. The Anglo-Zulu Wars were in part an attempt by the British to repress the Zulu army so as to pave the way for the creation of a Confederation of South Africa which united all of the colonial entities into one unit.

Today, memorials and markers show the points at Isandlwana Battlefield where British soldiers fell. There is also a small Isandlwana Battlefield museum at the visitor centre. A visit to Isandlwana Battlefield is usually coupled with one to nearby Rorke’s Drift, particularly as the two are connected by road.

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6. Rorke’s Drift

Rorke’s Drift in South Africa was the site of a famous battle during the Anglo-Zulu Wars in which 139 British soldiers fiercely and successfully defended the area and their garrison against between four and five thousand Zulu Warriors.

Today, there is a British memorial at Rorke’s Drift, where visitors can tour the battlefield and view the visitor centre. Most visitors also take the opportunity to visit the nearby Isandlwana Battlefield.

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7. The Nelson Mandela Museum

The Nelson Mandela Museum at the Bhunga Building chronicles the life of South Africa’s iconic former president and his struggle for democracy and the end of the apartheid regime.

There are actually three locations of the Nelson Mandela Museum in the Eastern Cape, of which the Bhunga Building forms one. At the Bhunga Building, visitors can learn about Nelson Mandela’s past in his own words through extracts of his autobiography, “A Long Walk to Freedom". It also houses gifts given to Nelson Mandela when he was president.

From the Bhunga Building, tours then go onto the other two sites of the Nelson Mandela Museum, Mvezo, where Mandela was born and Qunu, where he spent his childhood.

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8. Voortrekker Monument

The Voortrekker Monument in Pretoria, South Africa commemorates the exodus of the Boers – Voortrekkers meaning pioneers - from the Cape Colony from 1835 and 1854.

The Voortrekker Monument is comprised of a vast granite structure surrounded by 64 ox-wagons – a symbol of Voortrekker practices - and is flanked by numerous statues of historic figures such as Boer leader Piet Retief. Inside the Voortrekker Monument is its large Hall of Heroes housing a historical frieze depicting the history of the Trek and a museum of Voortrekker history.

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9. Anglo-Boer War Museum

The Anglo-Boer War Museum, also known as the War Museum of the Boer Republics, in Bloemfontein, South Africa is one of the country’s most comprehensive museums about the Second Anglo-Boer War.

The museum chronicles the events leading up to the war, the course of the war and its aftermath. One of its most moving exhibits is that relating to concentration camps. The Second Anglo-Boer War is notorious for being the first war in which such camps were used, a strategy spearheaded by Lord Herbert Kitchener. The museum is next to the Women's Memorial, which commemorates those who perished in these camps.

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10. Majuba Hill

Majuba Hill in South Africa was the final battlefield of the First Anglo-Boer War. Sometimes known as the Transvaal War, the First Anglo-Boer War was an approximately year-long conflict in which the Boers rejected British annexation of the Transvaal region of South Africa.

Approximately 400 British soldiers, made up of the 58th Regiment and the 92nd Highlanders and led by Major-General Sir George Pomeroy Colley, had occupied Majuba Hill in early 1881. On 27 February 1881 at the Boers defeated the British in battle, effectively ending the war. Colley himself had been killed together with almost half of the force.

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Full list of Historic Sites in South Africa

Beyond the most famous South African cultural locations and monuments, there’s many similar places to visit, including Ladysmith Siege Museum, Spioenkop battlefield and Anglo-Boer War Museum to name but a few. We’re constantly expanding this list of Historic Sites in South Africa and you can view the current selection below.

Our database of Historic Sites in South Africa is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. So, if you know of other South African cultural locations and monuments, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by contacting us today.