World War One Sites

Use our WWI sites guide to explore World War One Sites and the battlefields, memorials and museums that commemorate the First World War.

For many people, visiting World War One sites can be one of the most immersive ways to learn about the conflict known as the “Great War”. Today, World War One sites ranging from museums and memorials to battle sites and airfields all stand in testimony to this terrible conflict. You can explore our selection of these WWI sites below and also filter these results by country, region or town by visiting our WWI sites map.

Whether you’re interested in the Western Front or the Gallipoli Campaign, we’ve set out many of the World War 1 sites around the globe. Once you’ve explored the list of  WW1 sites and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring World War One sites.

Remember, if you know of other World War One sites, memorials or ruins, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

World War One: Editor's Picks

Photo by Historvius

1. Somme battlefields

Incorporating several World War One sites, these battlefields are the locations at which the infamous Battle of the Somme was fought from July to November 1916. The Battle of the Somme was renowned for the exceptionally high number of casualties borne by the Allied forces.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Circuit of Remembrance is a route touring the Somme battlefields in France. The Battle of the Somme was an infamous First World War battle from July to November 1916, renowned for the controversial tactics employed by British forces and the exceptional number of casualties borne by the Allied forces.

A Flawed Plan
With the Allied and German forces in France deadlocked in trenches, British commanders planned to break the stalemate by destroying the German trenches and then having the British soldiers slowly walk across no-man’s land to capture them. This plan proved disastrous. Firstly, both the British troops and the French forces were already massively weakened by previous battles. This meant fewer French soldiers along the front line and that the remaining British soldiers were inexperienced volunteers, brought in to repopulate the depleted army.

Secondly, the plan was inextricably flawed. Not only did the extensive preparation by the British and the ongoing bombardment alert German forces to the upcoming attack, but the bombing raids and shelling barely dented the German fortifications. Therefore, when the soldiers started making their way across France’s muddy plains to the enemy lines, the Germans were prepared. Those who managed to make their way to the German trenches were then forced to try and return, unable to scale the barbed wire.

Circuit of Remembrance
A forty mile route, the Circuit of Remembrance or Somme battlefields tour starts from either the town of Albert or that of Peronne, winding through numerous battle sites, memorials and museums. This Somme battlefields tour explores the individual battles as well as going through individual towns occupied by different forces with signs along the way. Those who wish to embark on this route of Somme battlefields can download audio guides to the route for free from various sources, including from the website of the Historial de la Grande Guerre museum.

Many of the routes of the Somme battlefields are carried out by taxi and the taxi firms in the area have prepared itineraries for different routes. You can also walk the route (guided or not), do it by cart, by plane or by train, the latter route being the same as that used to carry supplies to the soldiers. The trip can take anything from half a day to a full day or more, depending on your level of interest.

Photo by Wolfgang Staudt (cc)

2. Fort Douaumont

Built following the Franco-Prussian wars, this fort acted as a shelter for locals during the Battle of Verdun. However, in the confusion, it was soon captured and destroyed by the Germans. Today, it remains one of the least changed of the World War 1 sites, with visitors able to see it as it was at the end of the war.

DID YOU KNOW?

Fort Douaumont (Fort de Douamont) was originally constructed in around 1885 following the Franco-Prussian wars, with ongoing works carried out until just before the First World War.

As a fully fortified structure with sophisticated weaponry and a sunken position on high ground, Fort Douaumont was considered to be a vital defensive post. However, when the Battle of Verdun commenced in February 1916, the village of Douaumont was in chaos. People went to shelter in Fort Douaumont but, in the confusion, nobody was firing the fort’s guns. German soldiers managed to infiltrate Fort Douaumont and its destruction ensued.

Today, visitors can see Fort Douaumont as it was at the end of World War One. You can take a tour through its three levels and see the guns, turrets and weaponry which remain. Despite the destruction, much of Fort Douaumont is well preserved including the barrack rooms and command posts. There is also a graveyard.


TAGS: WW1 Battlefields in France

Photo by sisaphus (cc)

3. Lochnagar Crater

This is one of the more vivid of World War I sites, it being the vast crater left behind by one of the first mine explosions of the Battle of the Somme on 1 July 1916.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Lochnagar Crater (Lochnagar Mine Crater) located in the village of La Boisselle in France’s Picardie region, is the site where one of the first explosions of the Battle of the Somme took place on 1 July 1916.

Set off by British forces at 7:28am, the mine which created the Lochnagar Crater was one of the biggest ever detonated at that time and Lochnagar Crater itself is an astounding 100 metres (328 feet) in diameter and 30 metres (98 feet) deep.

Today, visitors can see Lochnagar Crater, either as a one off site or as part of the Circuit of Remembrance, a route which explores the Battle of the Somme, one of the biggest battles in World War One.

Photo by Adam Jones, Ph.D. (cc)

4. Anzac Cove

One of the most important World War 1 sites of the Gallipoli Campaign in Turkey, Anzac Cove was where Australian and New Zealander troops landed on 25 April 1915. Today, it is home to numerous war memorials.

DID YOU KNOW?

Anzac Cove in Turkey’s Gallipoli Peninsula was the site where Australian and New Zealander troops landed on 25 April 1915.

The Anzac Cove landings were part of the Gallipoli Campaign, an effort by the Commonwealth and by the French to remove Turkey from World War I. In fact, the troops were meant to land elsewhere, but were erroneously dropped at Anzac Cove, which was a steep and difficult terrain.

Anzac Cove continued to be the main base of Australian and New Zealand forces throughout the eight month campaign and until Allied forces were evacuated from Gallipoli, having failed to take Turkey out of the conflict.

Today, there are several memorials at Anzac Cove and it is the site where Anzac Day ceremonies are held. This site also features as one of our Top 10 Tourist Attractions in Turkey.

Photo by R/DV/RS (cc)

5. Menin Gate

This is a famous monument is one of the most significant World War 1 sites in Ypres and is a memorial to the British and Commonwealth troops who went missing in action in Belgium during this conflict.

DID YOU KNOW?

Menin Gate (Menenpoort) is an impressive gateway in Ypres, Belguim which commemorates those British and Commonwealth soldiers who went missing in action in Belgium during World War One.

Ypres, now known by its Flemish name of Ieper, was a vital strategic point during the war and the site of fierce fighting, including three main battles together known as The Battle of Ypres. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers perished or went missing during this period and Menin Gate bears the names of 54,896 missing British and Commonwealth soldiers who died without graves.

Menin Gate is one of the most important First World War sites in Ypres and has a daily memorial ceremony at 8pm known as the Last Post Ceremony.

World War One: Site Index

Photo by jinterwas (cc)

Aisne-Marne American Cemetery

This World War One site is a cemetery on the location of the Battle of Belleau Wood (1-26 June 1918), where American marines prevented German forces from crossing the Marne River, thus securing the area.

DID YOU KNOW?

Aisne-Marne American Cemetery is a World War I cemetery on the site of the Battle of Belleau Wood, which took place from 1 June to 26 June 1918.

The Battle of Belleau Wood saw American marines stop the German army from crossing the Marne River, halting their progress and securing the area. In honour of the marines who fought in this battle, the woods were renamed “Woods of the Marine Brigade”.

There are 2,289 graves at Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, mostly belonging to soldiers who fought in the area and 250 of which are unnamed. Several memorials to the Battle of Belleau Wood surround the cemetery, including a memorial chapel, battle markers and a memorial to 1,060 missing soldiers. There is also a visitor centre and there is a guide on site when Aisne-Marne American Cemetery is open.


TAGS: WW1 Battlefields in France

Ari Burnu Cemetery

This Commonwealth military graveyard is the burial site of 252 soldiers who died in the Gallipoli campaign.

DID YOU KNOW?

Ari Burnu Cemetery in Gallipoli in Turkey was originally established in 1915, during the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I. It houses the graves of 252 Commonwealth soldiers who died during the eight month attempt to remove Turkey from the war. Of these graves, 42 are unidentified. Ari Burnu Cemetery also has several memorials to those believed to be buried there, but whose graves are unidentified.

Photo by pastorbuhro (cc)

Arlington National Cemetery

This famous US military cemetery commemorates all American soldiers who died for their country and is also the site of the Tomb of the Unknowns, one of whom is an unidentified soldier from World War I.

DID YOU KNOW?

Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia is both a military burial site and an iconic monument to fallen soldiers. Initially, the site of Arlington Cemetery began as a house – Arlington House – built in memory of President George Washington. The house, which still stands today, then became the property of Mary and Robert E. Lee.

During the American Civil War, Lee was asked to be a Union leader but refused, waiting to see how Virginia would side. When Virginia seceded from the Union in 1861, Lee became a commander of the Confederate army and fled from Arlington House shortly before the Union crossed the Potomac River and took the land around Washington. Eventually captured, Arlington House would become a Union army base.

In January 1864, the government legally purchased Arlington House and, later that year, desperately in need of space to bury the increasing number of war casualties, Quartermaster General Montgomery Meigs designated Arlington a national cemetery – a function for which it had unofficially already been used. By the end of the conflict in 1865, Arlington housed the graves of over 5,000 soldiers.

Over the years, Arlington National Cemetery has come to represent a memorial to all US soldiers who have died for their country and is still an active cemetery. In fact, there are approximately 300,000 graves at Arlington National Cemetery, neatly aligned and each with a white headstone.

With its status as a nationally heritage site, Arlington National Cemetery has also formed the location of numerous monuments. Amongst these are The Arlington Memorial Amphitheatre, where memorials and funerals are held, the United States Marine Corps Memorial, an iconic statue depicting soldiers raising the American flag and the Women in Military Service for America Memorial.

Arlington National Cemetery is also the home of The Tomb of the Unknowns, a burial place for one unidentified soldier from each of World War I, World War II and the Korean War. There was a soldier from the Vietnam War, but he was later identified and moved.

Many famous Americans are buried at Arlington National Cemetery, from military heroes to astronauts and leaders such as President John F Kennedy. Those visiting Arlington National Cemetery can start at the visitor centre, where there are guide books, maps and exhibits. Arlington House itself is also open to the public, with a museum and guides chronicling this building’s unique history.

Averof Museum

The most famous Greek warship, the Averof saw action for over 40 years including during the two world wars.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Georgios Averof is the most famous of all Greek warships and was in service for over 40 years, including seeing action during both world wars. Today the Averof is home to a maritime and nautical museum in Athens.

Launched in 1911, the warship was built at the Orlando Shipyards in Livorno, Italy and paid for with the help of one of Greece’s most significant benefactors, Georgios Averof – after whom it was named.

Over the following decades, the Averof had a long service history. She saw action in both the first and second World Wars as well as during the two Balkan Wars.

Decommissioned in 1952, the Averof has now been renovated and transformed into the Averof Museum, a naval museum that serves to honour all those who lost their lives at sea fighting for their country. Visitors learn the history of the Hellenic navy and the museum also organises exhibitions and seminars on Greek and international nautical history.

Photo by Horia Varlan (cc)

Bucharest Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

The Bucharest Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is a national Romanian World War I monument.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Bucharest Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (Mormantul Soldatului Necunoscut) is a national Romanian monument commemorating the soldiers who died for the country in World War I.

Photo by detsang (cc)

Canadian National War Memorial

The Canadian National War Memorial commemorates losses from World War I, World War II and the Korean War.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Canadian National War Memorial commemorates losses from World War I and, since 2000, it has also come to represent those who fell in World War II and the Korean War. A large granite cenotaph located in Ottawa, the Canadian National War Memorial is also home to the Canadian Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

Photo by jaycross (cc)

Canadian War Museum

The Canadian War Museum is the national military history museum.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Canadian War Museum (Musee Canadien De La Guerre) is the national military history museum.

With over 2,000 artefacts on display ranging from weapons to vehicles as well as photos, interactive and artistic exhibits, the Canadian War Museum looks at the military history of Canada. It focuses particularly from the perspective of the personal experiences of those who took part and were affected by historic conflicts, both at home and on the battlefield.

The remit of the Canadian War Museum begins with exploring the very concept of war and moves from aboriginal warfare through to the European imperial wars, the South African Wars up to both World Wars and beyond.

Photo by NorthJoe (cc)

Chateau-Thierry American Monument

One of the main American World War 1 sites, the Chateau-Thierry American Monument commemorates US soldiers who fought in this war. A grand memorial, it overlooks the River Marne, site of two important battles.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Chateau-Thierry American Monument, sometimes known as the Hill 204 Monument, commemorates those American soldiers who fought in the region during World War I, such as those who took part in the Second Battle of the Marne.

Overlooking the River Marne, the granite structure of the Chateau-Thierry American Monument is a commanding sight with its colonnades and heroic statues.

Visitors to the Chateau-Thierry American Monument can learn about the battles which took place in the area using the orientation map on the monument. (Main image by NorthJoe (cc))

Cimetière Chinois de Nolette

One of the lesser known World War 1 sites, Cimetière Chinois de Nolette is home to the graves of 849 Chinese workers who perished in the “Great War”.

DID YOU KNOW?

Cimetière Chinois de Nolette or the Nolette Chinese Cemetery in France is the burial place of 849 Chinese workers who died during World War One. Brought by the British from the colonies to help build the military infrastructure, most of these workers died from an outbreak of cholera.

Cimetière Chinois de Nolette is a memorial to these workers, built in a traditional Chinese style.

Photo by cliff1066™ (cc)

College Park Aviation Museum

This is a museum of the history of aviation, including that of World War One.

DID YOU KNOW?

In addition to being the longest operating airport in the world and the site where Wilbur Wright – one of the Wright brothers – trained the first aviators, College Park Aviation Museum in Maryland is now a museum which explores the history of aviation, including the World War One era.

Photo by ** Maurice ** (cc)

Douaumont Ossuary

This vast memorial, museum and cemetery commemorates those soldiers who lost their lives in the fierce Battle of Verdun (21 February 1916-December 1916). This site is home to the bones of 130,000 unknown soldiers.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Douaumont Ossuary in Verdun, France, is a memorial site to the soldiers who died whilst fighting in the Battle of Verdun during the First World War. The Battle of Verdun was one of the fiercest during World War One, lasting from 21 February 1916 to December 1916 and resulting in estimated casualties of 400,000 soldiers for each of the French and German armies who fought in it.

The Douaumont Ossuary houses the bones of approximately 130,000 unknown soldiers from both sides, marking a fitting reminder to the savage consequences of this battle and the war as a whole. These remains can been seen through small windows inside the Douaumont Ossuary and the Ossuary’s cloisters are lined with plaques of the names of fallen soldiers and the locations of where each body was recovered. It also has a chapel where ceremonies take place.

Made up of an imposing stone structure with a 46 metre tower and beautifully maintained fields which house a cemetery with the graves of a further 15,000 French soldiers, the Douaumont Ossuary overlooks the battlefield of the Battle of Verdun. Visitors can climb to the top of its tower for panoramic views of these fields.

The first floor of the Douaumont Ossuary is dedicated to a museum of the First World War which includes weaponry, pieces from destroyed villages and the Minenwerfer, a well preserved 76 mm German mortar. Visitors to the Douaumont Ossuary can view a twenty minute film on the heroism of the Verdun soldiers in German, English and Dutch, which is shown every half hour.


TAGS: WW1 Battlefields in France

Dunkirk Cemetery and Memorial

Whilst Dunkirk is usually associated with World War Two, this cemetery contains the graves of soldiers from both this conflict and WWI.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Dunkirk Cemetery and Memorial are located near the site where hundreds of thousands of allied troops were evacuated as part of Operation Dynamo – the historic campaign to rescue cut off troops from advancing German forces during World War II. Dunkirk had also played an important role as an allied base in World War I.

Dunkirk Cemetery houses 460 World War I graves and 793 from World War II, of which 223 are unidentified. At the entrance to Dunkirk Cemetery is the Dunkirk Memorial, commemorating 4,500 British Expeditionary Force troops who died or were captured there during World War II and who have no known grave.

Endless Column Complex

The Endless Column Complex is a set of three sculptures commemorating Romania’s war heroes from World War One.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Endless Column Complex is a set of three sculptures commemorating Romania’s war heroes from World War One. It is comprised of the striking 30 metre-high Endless Column, the Table of Silence and the Gate of the Kiss.

Essex Farm Cemetery

Essex Farm Cemetery is a CWGC cemetery and famed as the site where John McCrae wrote 'In Flanders Fields'.

DID YOU KNOW?

Essex Farm Cemetery is a CWGC cemetery just north of Ypres where 1,199 World War I servicemen were buried, 102 of which were unidentified. Several divisions used the Essex Farm Cemetery, including the 49th (West Riding) Division and 38th (Welsh) Division

During the war, the site of Essex Farm Cemetery was the location of an Advanced Dressing Station or 'ADS'. This particular ADS was the site where Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae of the Canadian Army Medical Corps wrote the poem 'In Flanders Fields' in May 1915.

Photo by Charles D P Miller (cc)

Etaples Military Cemetery

The Etaples Military Cemetery is a commonwealth cemetery built on the former site of a WW1 military hospital.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Etaples Military Cemetery stands on the former site of a vast military hospital complex used by the Allies during the First World War.

At its height, over 100,000 troops would have been camped here, either in training from the front or receiving treatment for wounds sustained. The hospitals themselves could cater for over 20,000 casualties at any one time. The site was chosen due to it’s distance from the front lines but good transport links, meaning troops could be brought here quickly without being in danger of enemy land attacks.

The cemetery was inaugurated on May 14th, 1922 by King George V and General Douglas Haig.

The site was briefly resurrected as a hospital complex during the early months of World War Two until the German conquest of France.

Today, the Etaples Military Cemetery contains the burials of over 10,000 Commonwealth troops and over 500 non-commonwealth combatants.


TAGS: WW1 Battlefields in France

Photo by James Niland (cc)

Fort Lytton

Fort Lytton is an important historic site. Built in 1881 and used for the defence of Brisbane until the end of the Second World War, it is a pentagonal fortress concealed behind grassy embankments

DID YOU KNOW?

Fort Lytton is a 19th century fortress which formed the focus of Queensland’s defensive forces and was used to protect Brisbane until the end of World War II. Built in 1881, it was constructed in typical pentagonal shape, hidden within a grassy mound and surrounded by a moat. Fort Lytton was also armed with an extensive arsenal.

Photo by Ryan Scott (cc)

Fort Vaux

Situated just outside Verdun, this nineteenth century fort was famously defended by French forces in the Battle of Verdun before falling to the Germans. It would be returned to the French later that same year.

DID YOU KNOW?

Fort Vaux or 'Fort De Vaux', located just outside Verdun, was a nineteenth century defensive structure which was fiercely defended by French forces during the Battle of Verdun in World War One. It was the second such fort to be captured after the nearby Fort Douaumont.

The soldiers refused to abandon Fort Vaux, staying until they had run out of all supplies and even carrier pigeons. In a famous moment which represents French heroism, Major Raynal, who was in the fort, was using these pigeons to carry messages to his commanding officers and continued trying until he reached his final carrier pigeon, known as Cheramie.

These efforts proved futile and Fort Vaux fell to the Germans in 1916, only to be evacuated and returned to the French in November that same year. Visitors can tour the inside of Fort Vaux, which includes its impressive weaponry and, of course, the pigeon loft.

Photo by Stubacca (cc)

Grey Point Fort

Grey Point Fort is a WWI era coastal defence battery and one of the best preserved early 20th century coastal forts anywhere in the British Isles.

DID YOU KNOW?

Grey Point Fort is a coastal defence battery designed to defend the entrance to Belfast Lough which now houses a museum focusing on military history.

Built in 1904 and operational in both World Wars, Grey Point Fort originally housed a number of large-calibre coastal guns designed to protect against naval attack.

Throughout World War Two the complex was used as the coastal defence headquarters for Northern Ireland. Though it never saw action in a military engagement, legend states that during a test-firing of its two six inch guns a cow was killed on the Antrim side.

For the past three years Grey Point Fort has undergone a restoration project run by volunteers and it now houses the Military Memorabilia Museum as well as a unique WW2 Military Radio Museum, built up by amateur radio enthusiasts and funded by donations from the public and old soldiers.

The museums contain a fascinating collection of military memorabilia as well as historic military radio equipment such as Morse code telegraphic kits and an original a Bletchley Park receiver.

Today, as well as the museums, visitors can still explore the massive gun emplacements and the guns themselves – sadly not the originals – while also exploring the other areas of the battery, such as the fort's observation posts. A useful map of the site can be found here.

It is thought that Grey Point is one of the best preserved 20th century coastal defence forts anywhere in the British Isles and is unique to Northern Ireland.

Hill 60 Cemetery

Located in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey, this Commonwealth Graves Commission cemetery is one of the World War One sites for those solider who died in the Gallipoli Campaign.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Hill 60 Cemetery in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey is a Commonwealth Graves Commission burial site for 788 soldiers who died during the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I. The Hill 60 Cemetery is located on the site of the Battle of Hill 60.

The Gallipoli Campaign was an eight month effort by the Commonwealth and the French to remove the Ottoman Empire – Turkey – from the war and open supply lines to Russia. The west coast of the Gallipoli Peninsula, where the conflict took place, became known as Anzac as it was where the Australian and New Zealand forces were based. Hill 60 was a vital link between Anzac and the area of Suvla.

On 22 August 1915, Commonwealth forces launched an attack with the aim of capturing Hill 60, a clash known as the Battle of Hill 60. Amongst those involved were the Canterbury and Otago Mounted Rifles, the New Zealand Mounted Rifles, the 13th, 14th, 15th, 17th and 18th Australian Infantry Battalions, the 9th and 10th Australian Light Horse division and the 5th Connaught Rangers. These forces successfully wrested Hill 60 from Turkish control and held it until the later evacuation of the Allied forces.

Only 76 of the graves at the Hill 60 Cemetery, which nestles amongst the trenches established during the conflict, are identified, the rest remaining unknown. There are also four memorials to the New Zealand forces who died in the campaign, one of which is known as the Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial.

Photo by amandabhslater (cc)

Hill 62 Sanctuary Wood Museum

The Hill 62 Sanctuary Wood Museum contains an impressive partially-restored WWI trench system as well as artefacts and images from the site.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Hill 62 Sanctuary Wood Museum near Ypres in Belgium contains an impressive partially restored British World War One trench system.

Located near to the original front lines, the Sanctuary Wood Trenches were left in place by the owner of the land after the war and were preserved in-situ from that time. A museum was later opened at the site and the trenches were partially-restored to ensure they survived the increasing number of visitors.

Today visitors can explore these trenches and covered passageways as well as a section of the underground tunnel system.

The Hill 62 Sanctuary Wood Museum itself is a small, family-run affair and contains a number of artefacts from the site as well as images from the war – note these images are quite graphic in places.

Photo by yannick_vernet (cc)

Historial de la Grande Guerre

Within reach of the World War I sites of the Battle of the Somme, this museum looks at the social and cultural effects of the Great War.

DID YOU KNOW?

Historial de la Grande Guerre (the Museum of the Great War) in Peronne, France is dedicated to exploring the social and cultural effects of the First World War. Based near the site of the Battle of the Somme, Historial de la Grande Guerre offers an in-depth insight into World War I from the perspective of the soldiers who fought in it and the civilians whom it affected.

Each room in the Historial de la Grande Guerre is divided into two parts. In the centre of each room are the uniforms of each type of soldier contained in sunken display cases together with weaponry and other relevant pieces. Each room is then bordered by further displays, themselves divided into three segments to represent the French, English and German forces. Yet, despite the fact that it displays military pieces, Historial de la Grande Guerre does not aim to be a military museum or to commemorate those who died fighting. Instead, its aims are to look at the social effects of the war both on civilians and soldiers.

Historial de la Grande Guerre translates all of its exhibitions into English, French and German and contains tens of monitors showing silent films about the war.

Photo by _dChris (cc)

Imperial War Museum

The Imperial War Museum is a London-based museum dedicated to world conflict and has several impressive exhibits about the First World War.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Imperial War Museum is dedicated to exploring worldwide conflicts throughout history. The exhibitions in the London Imperial War Museum cover, amongst other things, different aspects of the First and Second World Wars including military history, the Holocaust, women’s roles in the conflicts, wartime artwork and the political issues of the time.

The Imperial War Museum is particularly child-friendly, with temporary exhibitions such as a reconstruction of a World War I trench.

Photo by Dave Hamster (cc)

Imperial War Museum Duxford

Set in a World War One airfield, this museum looks at several aspects of military history and explores military history on land, by air and by sea.

DID YOU KNOW?

Duxford Imperial War Museum in Cambridge is dedicated to exploring Britain’s military history, particularly as it relates to air and maritime warfare.

Duxford Imperial War Museum is fittingly located at Duxford Airfield, one of the best preserved First World War airfields. Most of the exhibits at the Duxford Imperial War Museum are contained in hangars, with each hangar exploring a different aspect of military history. For example, hangar 1 tells the story of British and Commonwealth aviation history, hangar 2 is a “flying museum” where operating aircraft are held and maintained and hangar 3 holds a maritime collection.

There is also an American Air Museum, exhibiting various battle aircrafts from the US. Duxford Imperial War Museum’s fourth hangar is dedicated to the Battle of Britain, a famous air battle in World War II.

Photo by Bernt Rostad (cc)

In Flanders Field Museum

Dedicated to World War One, this Belgian museum looks at the war from several different perspectives and is a comprehensive museum of both the First World War and Ypres’s role in the conflict.

DID YOU KNOW?

The In Flanders Field Museum is a Belgian museum mostly dedicated to World War One and based on Cloth Hall, a medieval building.

In Flanders Field looks at the Great War from four perspectives. The first is a personal view of the war, inviting visitors to meet characters who were in Flanders during the First World War through multimedia presentations, information boards and written accounts.

The second part of the exhibition looks at medieval Ypres and how it was destroyed by the conflict. The third aspect of the In Flanders Field exhibition explores the war as it took place in Ypres and Flanders, the part it played in the war and the First World War as a whole. It looks at the causes of the First World War, the armies that fought in it and its legacy as well as at the medical history.

The final part of the In Flanders Field Museum is dedicated to wartime art. The In Flanders Field Museum translates its exhibitions into four languages and uses a combination of print, pictures and multimedia displays throughout its exhibitions.

Photo by R/DV/RS (cc)

Irish Peace Tower

The Irish Peace Tower is an imposing 100-ft memorial to all First World War Irish casualties and remembers soldiers from both the Catholic and Protestant communities.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Irish Peace Tower, also called the Island of Ireland Peace Park, is a memorial to all Irish casualties in World War One and remembers both those from the Catholic and Protestant communities.

Opened in 1998 by then-President of Ireland, Mary McAleese, alongside Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom and King Albert II of Belgium, the Irish Peace Tower consists of a one hundred foot tall tower built using stone brought from Ireland.

The location of the Irish Peace Tower is significant as it signifies an important moment in World War One where both Protestant and Catholic Irish divisions fought side-by-side during the 1917 battle for the Messines Ridge.

Kabatepe Museum

Located amidst the World War 1 sites of the Turkish Gallipoli Peninsula, this museum exhibits items related to the Gallipoli Campaign.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Kabatepe Simulation Center or Kabatepe Museum in Gallipoli in Turkey is houses a collection of historic items relating to the Gallipoli Campaign of World War I.

The Gallipoli Campaign saw French and Commonwealth forces engage in a war with Turkey – then the Ottoman Empire - in order to remove the country from the First World War. One of the main reasons for this was that Turkey was an important route by which to supply Russia. It was also hoped that this would end the deadlock on the Western Front.

Whilst small, the Kabatepe Museum has an interesting collection ranging from uniforms and weaponry to letters and even bullet-pierced skulls.

Photo by rs-foto (cc)

Konigstein Fortress

This medieval castle is Dresden has been everything from a stronghold to a prisoner of war camp during both World Wars.

DID YOU KNOW?

Konigstein Fortress or Festung Königstein is a famous fortified structure near Dresden, Germany which has never been taken. It is unclear when Konigstein Fortress was first constructed, but mentions of a castle on the site go back to 1233.

As a castle, Konigstein was used as a stronghold and a sixteenth century monastery before Elector Christian I converted it into a fortress in 1589. It then served as a prison until Napoleon’s conquest of Prussia when it became a fortress of the Confederation of the Rhine.

Konigstein Fortress continued to be used for various other purposes over the centuries, being everything from a retreat for soldiers to a hiding place for the Saxon royal family. During both World War I and World War II it was used as a prisoner of war camp.

Today, Konigstein Fortress is a museum, showing the history of the site throughout its existence. Guided tours are offered for an added fee and audio guides are also available to rent in eight languages.

Photo by edwin.11 (cc)

Kranji War Cemetery

Used as a World War Two wartime hospital, Kranji War Cemetery is now a military graveyard including a number of World War I graves.

DID YOU KNOW?

Kranji War Cemetery was founded as a hospital burial place during the Japanese occupation of Singapore in World War II. Following the war, it became a veterans’ cemetery and today Kranji War Cemetery in the northern Singapore region of Kranji is home to 4,458 marked graves.

These graves belong to the service men and women who fought for Singapore’s freedom in World War II, of which almost nine hundred are unidentified. Kranji War Cemetery is also home to 64 World War I graves, many of which were actually moved to Kranji War Cemetery at a later date. For example, three of the World War I memorials are for soldiers who were buried in Singapore and Saigon, but whose grave have never been found.

Kranji War Cemetery is also the resting place of some of Singapore’s presidents including its first two presidents, Inche Yusuf bin Ishak and Benjamin Henry Sheares. Kranji War Cemetery sits beside the Kranji War Memorial, dedicated to those who fought for Singapore in World War II.

Kungsö Battery

The Kungso Battery in Aland was a World War I Russian fortification.

DID YOU KNOW?

.The Kungso Battery in Aland, Finland was a World War I Russian fortification also known as Coastal Battery N 71. Although destroyed in 1919, some ruins of the Kungso Battery are still visible today with explanatory signs.

Photo by Eoghan OLionnain (cc)

Langemark Cemetery

Located at one of the World War 1 sites of the Battle of Ypres, this cemetery is where approximately 44,000 German troops are buried, many in mass graves.

DID YOU KNOW?

Langemark Cemetery in Flanders, Belgium, is the burial site of around 44,000 German soldiers who fought in the First World War.

Many of the graves at Langemark Cemetery are mass graves. Langemark was the site of one of the battles which together made up the Battle of Ypres between German and Allied forces. Ypres, today known as Iepers, was a vital strategic location for the Allies during the war.

Photo by openroads.com (cc)

Le P’tit Train de la Haute Somme

This museum has reconstructed the train line once used to move supplies to and from the front line during the Battle of the Somme, complete with traditional steam and diesel trains.

DID YOU KNOW?

Le P’tit Train de la Haute Somme (the Somme train line) is a reconstruction of the original train line used to transport supplies to and from the battlefield during the Battle of the Somme in World War I.

Le P’tit Train de la Haute Somme still operates today as a tourist attractions, using traditional steam or diesel trains. Le P’tit Train de la Haute Somme also has a museum, some of which concerns the World War I aspects of the railways and others of which are related to the use of the railways for industrial purposes.

Photo by laszlo-photo (cc)

Lone Pine Cemetery

This is a Commonwealth cemetery located on one of the World War 1 battle sites of the Gallipoli Campaign and housing the graves of over a thousand casualties of this episode of the war.

DID YOU KNOW?

Lone Pine Cemetery in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey is the final resting place of 1,167 Commonwealth troops, 504 unidentified, who fought in the Gallipoli Campaign, an eight month effort during World War I to remove the Ottoman Empire from the war.

Named after a single tree that grew there and stood throughout the conflict, Lone Pine Cemetery is located on the site of the Battle of Lone Pine. At the beginning of the conflict, in April 1915, Australian forces had briefly managed to take this strategically important location before Turkish forces recaptured it and held it for several months.

On 6 August 1915, Australian forces made a second attempt at taking Lone Pine. The attack was successful and by 10 August, they had captured the area. They would hold it until they were evacuated in December.

Lone Pine Cemetery is also the home of the Lone Pine Memorial.

Photo by Adam Jones, Ph.D. (cc)

Lone Pine Memorial

This is a memorial to Australian and New Zealand casualties of the Gallipoli Campaign.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Lone Pine Memorial in Gallipoli in Turkey commemorates over 4,900 New Zealand and Australian soldiers who perished in the Anzac area and who have no known grave during the Gallipoli Campaign of World War I.

The Gallipoli Campaign involved troops from throughout the Commonwealth and from France. It was an eight month effort to open supply lines through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea through to Russia and to remove the Ottoman Empire from the war.

The Lone Pine Memorial is within the Lone Pine Cemetery and stands before the front lines of one of the battle sites of the Gallipoli Campaign.

Louvemont

Formerly a village but now utterly silent, Louvemont is said to have “died for France” because the extent of the damage caused to it during the war meant it was abandoned. This is one of the more haunting of World War One sites.

DID YOU KNOW?

Louvemont near Bras-Sur-Meuse in France, was once a small French village. However, when the Battle of Verdun broke out in 1916, Louvemont became one of the “villages that died for France”. It was so badly damaged by war that Louvemont was never again occupied, becoming a ghost of its past.

Very little remains here, however that which does or has been built since commemorates Louvemont and its former residents. Like other former villages of its kind in this region, Louvemont contains several memorials and plaques describing the people who used to live there and the shops and families who inhabited it. There is now also a modest chapel at Louvemont which was consecrated in the 1930s together with a handful of graves.

This is a small site without any formal guidance. It might be seen as part of a general tour of Verdun.

Photo by ThruTheseLines (cc)

Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917

A museum all about the Battle of Passchendaele including details of the World War One sites in the area, the Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917 provides a comprehensive account of the battle.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917, also known as the Passchendaele Memorial Museum, is a Belgian museum dedicated to the Battle of Passchendaele.

The Battle of Passchendaele was one of numerous battles which made up the Battle of Ypres in World War One and has become an iconic symbol of the futility of war. In the Battle of Passchendaele, over half a million troops died for the sake of five miles of territory gained by the Allies from the Germans.

The Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917 explores the events which led up to this battle, the experiences of the soldiers who fought in it and its consequences. Using a combination of multimedia presentations, reconstructions, photographs and original objects, the Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917 provides a comprehensive account of this aspect of the First World War.

The Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917 also has a wealth of information about other sites in the area and is therefore a great place to start a tour of the Passchendaele battlefields and sites of the Battle of Ypres.

Photo by Historvius

Museum of the Great War

The Museum of the Great War guides visitors through the years of the First World War using a vast archive of objects, that are displayed across multimedia exhibitions.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Museum of the Great War guides visitors through the years of the First World War using a vast archive of objects, that are displayed across multimedia exhibitions.

Housed within an impressive contemporary structure, the museum is located in the city of Meaux, France. Since opening in 2011, it has become known for its vast collection of unique items, weaponry, uniforms, documents, graphic artworks and photographs that are woven together to create a narrative that is both moving and highly educational.

The historical city of Meaux is dotted with landmarks from WWI, partially due to its vital role in the Battle of Marne in 1914, at which time soldiers bravely protected the city gates from attack. It is here you will find a monument dedicated to those who lost their lives helping to prevent the fall of the city.

Alongside its changing exhibitions, the museum splits itself into a number of predominant categories, from the role of women in times of conflict to the lives of those in captivity, which allow for a comprehensive view of the years spanning the war. The museum emphasises some of the key issues that countries were facing at the time, such as the need for a superior military strategy and the importance of new technologies, as well as the need to maintain
morale on the home front.

Within the Museum of the Great War, there is a carefully crafted reconstruction of a French and German battlefield, including a trench and No Man's Land. The visuals and audio used throughout the exhibitions create a powerful ambience, which helps to convey the terrible suffering of war from the perspective of all who lived and fought during this period.

By combining informative used items from the time with intimate photographs and short
films, the Museum of the Great War is unique in its representation of the world's first notably widespread conflict.

National World War I Museum

The US National World War I Museum is a comprehensive museum of the history and legacy of this global conflict.

DID YOU KNOW?

The US National World War I Museum chronicles the events of the conflict that engulfed thirty-six countries around the globe from 1914 to - at least officially - 1919.

From the origins of the conflict to the experiences of those who went through it and its aftermath, the National World War I Museum explores all aspects of this "Great War".

In its main exhibition, the National World War I Museum offers an impressive range of information, objects and exhibits to tell this dramatic story. From symbolic elements such as a 9,000-strong poppy field, timelines and personal belongings of civilians to the imposing big guns, it’s all on display.

There are also several films and interactive elements as well as recreations of trench systems. Part of what makes the National World War I Museum so interesting is that its collection derives from all the countries involved in the war, providing a fascinating overview from all angles.

Beyond its extensive main exhibits, the National World War I Museum is also located within the Liberty Memorial, a national monument to the fallen of World War I. Those who visit the museum can climb the tower of this monument.

Newfoundland Memorial

This is a memorial to the Canadian troops who fought in the First World War. It is located on the site of fierce fighting during the Battle of the Somme.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Newfoundland Memorial, located in the town of Beaumont-Hamel in France’s Picardie region is a commemoration of the Canadian forces’ efforts during the First World War, particularly the Battle of the Somme.

The Battle of the Somme was made up of a series of battles in this region of France and, on 1 July 1916, the 1st Battalion of the Newfoundland Regiment, who formed part of the 29th British Division, took part in one of these battles at Beaumont-Hamel. This bloody battle took a terrible toll on the Canadian forces, who lost around two-thirds of their soldiers within the space of an hour.

Once the site of fierce fighting and destruction, the location of the Newfoundland Memorial is now peaceful parkland, indented with the remains of wartime trenches. In fact, the trenches at the site of the Newfoundland Memorial are some of the best preserved of their kind and offer visitors an invaluable insight into the conditions of the Great War.

The Newfoundland Memorial consists of a number of battle sites, each of which are signposted, several cemeteries, memorials to the Newfoundland Division and to the Highland Division. Information panels guide the way through each of the battle sites and remains. Finally, at the interpretation centre, visitors can learn more about the origins of the Canadian soldiers and about the Somme. Guided tours are available in French and English.

Oise-Aisne American Cemetery

Oise-Aisne American Cemetery is a World War I cemetery and memorial containing the grave of 6,012 American soldiers who lost their lives in this conflict.

DID YOU KNOW?

Oise-Aisne American Cemetery is a World War I cemetery and memorial containing the grave of 6,012 American soldiers who lost their lives in this conflict.

This article is a stub and is currently being expanded by our editorial team.

Passchendaele New British Cemetery

This is a World War 1 graveyard located near the site of the Battle of Passchendaele and managed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

DID YOU KNOW?

Passchendaele New British Cemetery is a World War One graveyard and memorial site in the town of Zonnebeke, Belgium near the battlefield of Passchendaele. The Battle of Passchendaele was a fierce conflict in the First World War and part of the Battle of Ypres.

Comprised of three levels and designed by Charles Holden, Passchendaele New British Cemetery was founded following the Armistice. It was populated by graves from both Passchendaele and Langemarck and today acts as the final resting place of 2,101 Allied soldiers, most of whom are unidentified.

Managed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Passchendaele New British Cemetery also has numerous First World War memorials.

Photo by R/DV/RS (cc)

Ploegsteert Memorial

The Ploegsteert Memorial commemorates over 11,000 British and South African servicemen who died in this region during WWI and have no known grave.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Ploegsteert Memorial near the French-Belgium border commemorates over 11,000 British and South African servicemen who died in this region during World War One and have no known grave.

Located around 10 miles south of Ypres, the Ploegsteert Memorial is one of a number of such sites in the area which stand testament to those missing soldiers who disappeared in the bitterly fought battles which took place here..

As well as a place where visitors can come to remember, on the first Friday of every month at 7pm the Last Post is sounded here.

Pozieres

One of the First World War sites which played host to one of the clashes of the Battle of the Somme, the village of Pozieres was an important German stronghold in the war. Today, visitors can gain an insight into this battle with memorials, signposts and information panels as well as a museum.

DID YOU KNOW?

Pozieres in France was the site of the Battle of Pozieres in World War I. Starting in the summer of 1916, the Battle of Pozieres was the first of numerous battles together known as The Battle of the Somme. Before the battle, the village of Pozieres was a vital strategic point for German forces, its elevated location along the Thiepval-Ginchy ridge providing critical defence.

The Battle of Pozieres was carried out into two tranches, the first to capture the German Pozieres Trench and the second to capture the defences known as the ’Old German Lines’.

Fighting was initially carried out by the British Third and Fourth Armies, who were then joined and relieved by numerous Australian infantry units. At the end of the Battle of Pozieres, the Allies emerged victorious, marking a significant loss for the German army. However, this victory came at a heavy price.

The Battle of Pozieres claimed the lives of thousands of British and Australian soldiers, making it one of the bloodiest battles on the western front. The Australian forces, including the first, second and fourth Australian Divisions suffered significant losses, having carried out the majority of the offensive.

Today, visitors can follow the battle with signs and information panels and view the site of the Battle of Pozieres, including its Tank Memorial and the remnants of the Gibraltar blockhouse which was a German observation tower. There is also a cemetery and several obelisk shaped memorials. Poziers is one of the sites that make up the Circuit of Remembrance, a route along which visitors can explore the Battlle of the Somme.


TAGS: WW1 Battlefields in France

Quinn’s Post Cemetery

A strategic point for Anzac troops during the Galliplo Campaign, this is now the site of a Commonwealth cemetery.

DID YOU KNOW?

Quinn’s Post Cemetery is a Commonwealth World War I graveyard for those killed during the Gallipoli Campaign. Quinn’s Post was a vital strategic point for the New Zealand and Australian forces which saw fierce fighting throughout the eight month Gallipoli Campaign.

Quinn’s Post was named after Major Hugh Quinn of the 15th Battalion, who died there on 29 May 1915 in the course of one such attack. Quinn himself is actually buried at Shrapnel Valley Cemetery.

Today, the Quinn’s Post Cemetery is managed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and houses 473 graves, most of which are Australian and 294 of which are unidentified. Several memorials at Quinn’s Post Cemetery commemorate those missing soldiers or those with unknown graves.

Photo by Mr ATM (cc)

Royal Navy Submarine Museum

Home of the WWII submarine HMS Alliance, the Royal Navy Submarine Museum is a family-orientated, interactive museum detailing the history of British submarine warfare.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Royal Navy Submarine Museum is located a stone’s throw away from the busy historic Portsmouth docks. As home to HMS Alliance and four other submarines including the Royal Navy’s first submarine, Holland I, the museum takes an interactive approach to history; visitors can walk in and around the five submarines, experiencing for themselves what life on one of the vessels would have been like during their deployment.

Five submarines make up the museum’s collection: Holland I, the first submarine commissioned by the Royal Navy in 1901; HMS X24, which saw service during WWII; the German torpedo submarine Biber; and HMS Alliance, commissioned in 1947. Each submarine is paired with a gallery of information pertaining to its history, giving children and adults alike the chance to see the history they are reading about.

Visitors can partake in forty minute guided tours of HMS Alliance given by a submariner who will regale his audience with stories of life below the sea. Or you can wander by yourself as the children explore the newly opened ‘Horrible Science of Submarines’ exhibition.

The museum also contains an extensive collection of historic photographs and artefacts available for visitors to browse, including medals, equipment, art and personal effects of those who lived and served onboard the vessels and ones like them.

Throughout the year the museum hosts a variety of talks, presentations and readings by a variety of guests. Whichever time of year you choose to visit there is bound to be something for all the family.

Contributed by Isabelle Moore

Photo by Jim Linwood (cc)

Sanctuary Wood Cemetery

Sanctuary Wood Cemetery is a WWI Commonwealth cemetery containing the remains of soldiers who were killed in the region during the conflict.

DID YOU KNOW?

Sanctuary Wood Cemetery near Ypres is a First World War Commonwealth cemetery containing the remains of soldiers who were killed in the conflict.

The area around Sanctuary Wood Cemetery was close to the front lines during the 1914 Battle of Ypres and was also the scene of the 1915 Battle of Mount Sorrel.

Today this cemetery contains the graves or memorials of 1,989 Commonwealth servicemen.

Serbian Monument to the Unknown Hero

The Serbian Monument to the Unknown Hero is in memory of the victims of World War I and the Balkan Wars.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Serbian Monument to the Unknown Hero (Spomenik Neznanom junaku) was built in memory of the victims of World War I as well as the Balkan Wars. It is located on the former site of the medieval Zrnov fortress.

Photo by Historvius

Suomenlinna Fortress

Suomenlinna Fortress is an impressive, UNESCO-listed 18th century maritime fortification complex which has been property of the Swedish, the Russians and the Finnish.

DID YOU KNOW?

Suomenlinna Fortress is an impressive 18th century maritime fortification complex spread over eight islands in Helsinki and which has been property of the Swedish, the Russians and the Finnish. Considered an excellent example of the military architecture of the period, Suomenlinna Fortress is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Swedish Period
Begun by the Swedish in 1748, when Finland was an eastern Swedish territory, Suomenlinna Fortress was considered vital in terms of defence, especially with Sweden’s declining power and in an atmosphere of increased Russian imperialism. Named Sveaborg in 1750, Suomenlinna Fortress was also known as Viapori - the Finnish translation - until 1918.

Having avoided military engagement in the 18th century, the next century saw Suomenlinna Fortress become the subject of an enduring Russian attack in the Russo-Finnish War, also known as the ‘War of Finland’ (1808-1809). After a three-month siege, Suomenlinna Fortress fell to the Russians.

Russian Period
The Russians would go on to expand and garrison Suomenlinna Fortress, but, over time, large parts of it fell into disrepair. Renovations were undertaken as the Crimean War (1853–1856) approached, but Suomenlinna Fortress would go on to suffer significant damage during a two-day Anglo-French bombardment in this conflict, but remained in Russian hands.

In 1906, Suomenlinna Fortress was the site of the Viapori rebellion, a short-lived military revolt. Then, in World War I, it defended St Petersburg as part of the Peter the Great Fortress, but, before the war ended, on 6 December 1917, Finland declared independence from Russia.

Today
Suomenlinna Fortress has been under the control of the Finnish government since 1918 and outside military control since 1973.

Today, this is a fascinating place to visit and a popular one, with various things to see including a series of museums as well as sites such as the King’s Gate and the Great Courtyard. Military history enthusiasts will enjoy exploring its many bastions and there are guided tours. This site also features as one of our Top 10 Tourist Attractions in Finland.

The Brest-Hero Fortress

The Brest-Hero Fortress played an important role in 20th century military history.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Brest-Hero Fortress, also known simply as the Brest Fortress (Bresckaa krepasc), played an important role in 20th century history.

Begun in 1830, the Brest-Hero Fortress became an active military site on 26 April 1842. Since then it has played important roles in several conflicts including both World Wars and the German-Soviet War as well as being a notorious prison following Poland’s infamous Brest elections.

During these times, the Brest-Hero Fortress has changed hands on several occasions and suffered several attacks. However it is most famous as a symbol of Soviet resistance to German forces as part of Operation Barbarossa in 1941. Originally called the Brest Fortress, it was renamed the Brest-Hero Fortress in recognitions of its part in this event.

Today, the Brest-Hero Fortress is known both for its symbolism and for its 19th century military architecture. It now houses a museum of its own history and visitors can also wander through its impressive ruins.

The Canakkale Martyrs Memorial

This is a vast monument dedicated to the Turkish soldiers who perished in the Gallipoli Campaign.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Canakkale Martyrs Memorial, also known as Şehitler Abidesi, is a Turkish monument to the 253,000 Turkish soldiers who died in the Gallipoli Campaign.

This campaign, known in Turkey as the Canakkale Wars, took place in Turkey’s Gallipoli Peninsula. It was launched on 25 April 1915 by the Commonwealth and the French in order to remove the Ottoman Empire from the First World War and clear a supply route to Russia. It was also hoped that it would end the stalemate on the Western Front.

The campaign failed and Allied troops were evacuated from Gallipoli. The Canakkale Martyrs Memorial is a large four columned structured, each rising up 41.7 metres and with a Turkish flag on the underside of its square roof.

The Chapel of the Souvenir Francais

This chapel commemorates the French troops who fought in World War I, particularly those French soldiers who fought in the Battle of the Somme.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Chapel of the Souvenir Francais is a memorial church to the French soldiers who fought in the First World War, particularly the Battle of the Somme.

It was originally founded by the du Bos family, who lost their son in the battle on 25 September 1916 and who wanted a memorial for him and his comrades.

Located in the village of Rancourt, the Chapel of the Souvenir Francais stands next to Rancourt Cemetery, which, at 28,000 square metres is France’s largest burial ground for the soldiers of the Somme. Over 8,500 soldiers are buried here, each symbolised by a simple white cross.

The Chapel of the Souvenir Francais is one of the sites along the Circuit of Remembrance, a route which explores the role this region played in the First World War, specifically between September and November 1916.


TAGS: WW1 Battlefields in France

The Franco Australian Museum

One of the World War One sites dedicated to exploring this history of this war, The Franco Australian Museum focuses on the role of Australian in the conflict.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Franco Australian Museum in Villers-Bretonneux in France is one of the sites along the route dedicated to First World War history, known as the Circuit of Remembrance.

The Franco Australian Museum looks at the role played by Australian forces during the World War I. A small museum based on the first floor of the Victoria School, the Franco Australian Museum offers a variety of exhibitions including visual presentations.

The town of Villers-Bretonneux was also the site of fierce fighting during the First World War.

The Helles Memorial

This impressive memorial is dedicated to those who died in the eight month Gallipoli Campaign, especially those with no known grave.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Helles Memorial in Cape Helles in Turkey is a vast obelisk monument commemorating the tens of thousands of those who died in the Gallipoli Campaign, particularly those with no known grave.

The Gallipoli Campaign, brainchild of Winston Churchill, was an effort by the Commonwealth and the French during the First World War aimed at removing the Ottoman Empire from the conflict.

Taking place in the Turkish peninsula of Gallipoli, this campaign raged from 25 April 1915 to 6 January 1916 and was also intended to open a route by which to provide supplies to Russia and help end the stalemate which existed in the Western Front.

The Gallipoli Campaign failed to remove Turkey from the war and Allied soldiers were eventually evacuated from the region.

Cape Helles in the south was a main landing area for the Commonwealth and French forces. Over 21,000 names are listed on the Helles Memorial, including British and Indian troops as well as Australian soldiers from the 2nd Brigade AIF soldiers who fought in the Second Battle of Krithia on 8 May 1915.

The Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial

Set at the World War 1 site of the Battle of Hill 60, this is a memorial to the New Zealand soldiers who died in this clash.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey is a monument to the New Zealand soldiers who died in the Battle of Hill 60 and who have no known grave.

The Battle of Hill 60 was a successful attack by Commonwealth forces to capture this hill from Turkish forces in August 1915. It was one of the battles of the Commonwealth and French Gallipoli Campaign aimed at removing Turkey from World War I.

The Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial is one of four New Zealand memorials at the Commonwealth Hill 60 Cemetery.

The Liberty Memorial

The Liberty Memorial is a US national World War I monument in Kansas City in Missouri.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Liberty Memorial is a US national World War I monument in Kansas City in Missouri. It commemorates those soldiers who died in this war and was dedicated in 1926.

The Liberty Memorial is also home to the National World War I Museum and, in fact, you can enter the memorial via the museum.

Photo by tataquax (cc)

The London Royal Air Force Museum

The London Royal Air Force Museum offers a great overview of the history of aviation in combat and includes two hangars dedicated to World War I.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Royal Air Force Museum (RAF Museum) in Hendon in North London has a series of exhibitions dedicated to the history of the RAF and aviation in general.

Housing a fantastic collection of over 100 aircraft, the RAF museum has an impressive selection of planes including some of the most famous to have ever graced the skies.

Also on show at the London Royal Air Force Museum are a series of objects and structures from throughout the history of aviation, such as two World War I hangars, a World War II Battle of Britain exhibition and a timeline of aviation history.

The Marasesti Mausoleum

The Marasesti Mausoleum is an elaborate Romanian World War I monument.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Marasesti Mausoleum is an elaborate World War I monument dedicated to the Romanian troops who died in a famous battle with German forces. Completed in 1938, this impressive monument took over 15 years to finish.

The Battle of Marasesti was fought between 6 August and 8 September 1917 and despite being a major Romanian victory, did result in a very high death toll. The names of those who died are shown on the Marasesti Mausoleum. The battle is famous for the Romanian sentiment of "Pe aici nu se trece", meaning "they shall not pass".

The Somme 1916 Museum

This is a museum all about the Battle of the Somme, including uniforms, weapons and a trenches exhibit.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Somme 1916 Museum is part of the Circuit of Remembrance, a tour of the Picardie region of France dedicated to the Battle of the Somme. The Battle of the Somme was one of the most brutal battles of the First World War.

Based in a former crypt in the town of Albert which later acted as a Second World War underground shelter, The Somme 1916 Museum displays a series of exhibits relating to the Battle of the Somme, including original weaponry, uniforms and equipment as well as looking at the experiences of the soldiers in the trenches.

The Somme 1916 Museum uses a variety of methods to try and recreate soldiers’ lives, immersing visitors in the experience with imagery, sound effects and lighting. Guided tours are available in English, French and German as are films in the museum’s projection room.


TAGS: WW1 Battlefields in France

The Trench of Death

The Trench of Death is a network of First World War trenches in Belgium.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Trench of Death (De Dodengang) in Diksmuide, Belgium dates to the First World War and, as its name suggests, was amongst the most treacherous of trench systems and had areas of no man’s land as small as 50 metres wide. Well preserved and signposted, the Trench of Death site offers an insight into life on the front lines in the Great War.

Photo by MikeFitz (cc)

Thiepval Memorial

The Thiepval Memorial is a Commonwealth memorial dedicated to over 72,000 servicemen who died in the Somme region during WWI.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Thiepval Memorial is a Commonwealth memorial dedicated to over 72,000 servicemen from the United Kingdom and South Africa who died in the Somme region during World War One and have no known grave. Over 90% of those listed died in the devastating 1916 Battle of the Somme.

Consisting of a massive 45m-high arch resting on sixteen separate pillars, the Thiepval Memorial bears the names of all these missing soldiers.

Also at the Thiepval Memorial is a small cemetery containing the graves of both Commonwealth and French soldiers, signifying the fact that the Somme campaign was a joint operation between the allies.

There is a visitors centre alongside the Thiepval Memorial which contains more information about the history of the campaign and every year a major ceremony of commemoration is held at the Thiepval Memorial.

Photo by Jim Linwood (cc)

Tyne Cot Cemetery

Tyne Cot Cemetery is a WW1 Commonwealth cemetery in Belgium and the largest Commonwealth cemetery in the world.

DID YOU KNOW?

Tyne Cot Cemetery is a First World War Commonwealth cemetery in Belgium and, in terms of burials, is the largest Commonwealth war cemetery in the world.

The cemetery is positioned on the site of a German fortified stronghold which was captured by the 3rd Australian Division during the Battle of Passchendaele. Originally used as a small allied cemetery, the site was expanded after the war, with remains from nearby sites being transferred to the Tyne Cot Cemetery. Today this cemetery contains the graves or memorials of 11,956 Commonwealth servicemen.

The Tyne Cot Memorial, which also stands on the site, commemorates almost 35,000 other Commonwealth servicemen lost in the region during the conflict whose graves are not known.

In addition to the cemetery, the remains of the original German defences can still be seen within the site.

Ulster Memorial Tower

This is a 70-foot high replica of Helen’s Tower in Northern Ireland and it commemorates the men of Ulster who died in World War I.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Ulster Memorial Tower in Thiepval in France is a 70-foot high stone structure built as a memorial to the men of Ulster who fought and gave their lives during World War I. The first memorial to be built on the Western Front, the Ulster Memorial Tower is a replica of Helen’s Tower, an important monument which is located in County Down in Northern Ireland.

Located on what was the German front line during the Battle of the Somme, the Ulster Memorial Tower faces Thiepval Wood, the site from which the 36th (Ulster) Division made its charge on the first day of the famous offensive, 1 July 1916. Today, the site offers guided tours of these woods from its visitor centre.

Inside the Ulster Memorial Tower, visitors can view the plaques dedicated to the Irish soldiers, several paintings and visit its memorial chapel.


TAGS: WW1 Battlefields in France

Photo by Wolfgang S (cc)

Verdun Memorial

A museum and a memorial, this site is set at the location of one of the World War One sites of the Battle of Verdun.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Verdun Memorial (Mémorial de Verdun) is both a memorial site and a museum located in the Verdun Battlefield in France. The Battle of Verdun was a fierce clash between French and German forces in 1916 during the First World War which resulted in hundreds of thousands of casualties.

The Verdun Memorial is set amidst the site of this battle and the surrounding landscape bears the scars of the war, including mine and shell craters. The Verdun Memorial Museum displays an array of objects and documentation dating back to the Battle of Verdun, including weaponry, French and German aircraft, photographs and medical equipment.

Laid out over two floors, the Verdun Memorial Museum immerses the visitor in the realities of the battle by recreating the trench system and using multimedia presentations to guide visitors through the events of the war. Exhibits are translated into English, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Dutch, making the Verdun Memorial very accessible and the museum is divided thematically.

For those wishing to tour Verdun generally and see the different sites, the Verdun Memorial offers advice and itineraries, meaning it’s a good starting point for anyone touring independently. It also has a dedicated educational centre.


TAGS: WW1 Battlefields in France

Photo by Loimere (cc)

Vimy Ridge Memorial

The Vimy Ridge Memorial commemorates the more than 60,000 Canadians who lost their lives in th First World War.

DID YOU KNOW?

The striking Vimy Ridge Memorial is dedicated to the more than 60,000 Canadians who lost their lives in World War One.

Located on the site of a major victory by Canadian forces, the Battle of Vimy Ridge took place on 9th – 12th April 1917. During this action, the four divisions of the Canadian Corps captured the strategically important ridge and significantly aided the wider outcome of the Battle of Arras, of which the battle formed a part.

As the location of such a crucial Canadian victory, it was at Vimy Ridge that the Canadians chose as the site for their national memorial, and the site commemorates all those Canadians who fought in the war, as well as listing those with no known grave.

As well as the towering memorial, the site includes a number of restored First World War trenches and tunnels, which can also be explored by visitors.

Photo by jinterwas (cc)

Vis-En-Artois Cemetery

This is a First World War Commonwealth graveyard in France’s Pas de Calais region.

DID YOU KNOW?

Vis-En-Artois Cemetery is a burial site of Canadian and British soldiers who died in the First World War located between the villages of Vis-En-Artois and Haucourt.

Canadian forces took these villages in August 1918 and Vis-En-Artois Cemetery, which originally held 430 graves belonging to fallen Canadian soldiers and some from the Second Duke of Wellington regiment, has since been expanded to incorporate graves from smaller, surrounding cemeteries.

Vis-En-Artois Cemetery is now home to 2,369 First World War graves and is managed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Many of the graves at Vis-En-Artois Cemetery are unidentified and there are also several memorials.