What to see in Berlin - Top 10 Places to visit in Berlin

One of the most famous cities in the world, the list of what to see in Berlin is immense. A city packed full of character, culture and style, it pulls in millions of tourists each and every year - all seeking the very best places in Berlin to visit and usually fighting a tight schedule at the same time. From famous places with names steeped in history like the Reichstag, to the relatively obscure Berlin Flak Tower and far more beyond, Berlin simply has so much to see!

So if you’re planning to visit this glitzy yet gritty city and want to make the most of your trip, then our list of the top places to visit in Berlin could be just the thing for you. We’ve pulled together an expert selection highlighting what to see in Berlin on a short trip, with our top ten places to visit stacked alongside a handful of additional recommendations that didn’t quite make the cut but shouldn’t be ignored if you have more time.

And if that’s not enough, you can even explore our full list of sites in Berlin to your heart’s content.

What to see in Berlin - Top 10 Places to visit in Berlin: Editor's Picks

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1. Brandenburg Gate

Probably Berlin's most famous landmark, the Brandenburg Gate is a stunning Romanesque structure modelled on the ancient gateway to the Acropolis in Athens. Standing at the heart of the city, the Gate is a symbol of the German capital and is consistently ranked among the top 10 things to see in Berlin. Commissioned by King Frederick William II of Prussia and built between 1788 and 1791, today, visitors from around the world come to see the Brandenburg Gate and its ornate carvings, including its dramatic depiction of Victoria, the Roman goddess of victory, driving a horse drawn chariot.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Brandenburg Gate is a famous landmark in Berlin built between 1788 and 1791 which once served as a city gateway. Commissioned by King Frederick William II of Prussia it stood in the entrance to boulevard Unter den Linden, which led to the city palace.

The Brandenburg Gate was designed by Karl Gotthard Langhans and built in a Romanesque style similar to the Propylaea, the gateway to the Acropolis in Athens, with six Doric columns on each side.

Whilst King Frederick William II intended the Brandenburg Gate to be a symbol of peace, different peoples have attached numerous meanings to it throughout its history. The Nazis adopted the Brandenburg Gate as a symbol of their party during their reign in the 1930's and 1940's and it was also a potent reminder of the Cold War when it fell into the no-man’s land within the Berlin Wall. During this time, the Brandenburg Gate formed a focal point of many politically charged rallies and speeches, including visits by American Presidents John F Kennedy and Ronald Reagan.

A more positive symbolic attachment was formed in 1990, when, following the fall of the Berlin Wall, many viewed the Brandenburg Gate as emblematic of German reunification. Today, visitors from around the world come to see the Brandenburg Gate and its ornate carvings, including its dramatic depiction of Victoria, the Roman goddess of victory, driving a horse drawn chariot. The Brandenburg Gate features as one of our Top 10 Tourist Attractions in Germany.

Photo by Wolfgang Staudt (cc)

2. Reichstag

No visit to Berlin can miss the famous German parliament building, the Reichstag. One of the most popular places to visit in Berlin, the Reichstag Building as we know it today is a fusion of the original 19th century building - heavily damaged by the infamous fire of 1933 and subsequent WWII bombing - and a restoration project which finished in 1999. As well as viewing the stunning architecture particularly the remarkable roof terrace and dome, visitors can explore more via guided tours are available, but these must be booked in writing well in advance.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Reichstag Building started its life in 1894, when it served as the seat of the German Parliament, then known as the Reichstag. Designed by architect Paul Wallot during the reign of Emperor Wilhelm I, the Reichstag building contained several pioneering architectural elements, including a steel and glass copula which was the first of its kind.

Wilhelm I was succeeded by Wilhelm II by the time the Reichstag was completed in 1894 and, despite this new leader’s opposition to the institute of parliament, the Reichstag survived his reign and was the site where the politician Philipp Scheidemann proclaimed the institution of the German Weimar Republic in 1918. It served as such until 1933, when a fire tore through it, damaging it severely.  However, it was the socio-political consequences of this latter event which would have the most lasting effects.

The ruling National Socialist German Workers Party, the Nazis, blamed the fire on communist Marinus van der Lubbe and used the incident as an excuse to carry out a purge of any perceived traitors as well as banning the Communist Party altogether.

The Reichstag was heavily bombed during the Second World War and emerged as a ruin, the effects of which were exacerbated by its neglect during the Cold War. Whilst parts of the original Reichstag building, including its famous copula, were destroyed, it once again took centre stage in world politics on 3 October 1990, when it was the venue of the German Reunification Ceremony.

Reconstruction of the Reichstag followed and was completed in April 1999. It now houses the current German parliament, the Bundestag, and also acts as one of Germany’s most popular tourist attractions. Guided tours are available, but must be booked in writing well in advance.

Photo by siyublog (cc)

3. Berlin Wall

Probably the most famous of all the places to see in Berlin, the Berlin Wall split the city and was a dramatic symbol of the ideological struggle of the Cold War. An 87 mile long concrete barrier that divided East and West Berlin, the Wall was the most obvious embodiment of the so-called ‘Iron Curtain’ between eastern and western Europe. The fall of the Berlin Wall finally occurred on 9th November 1989 and it was almost completely dismantled in the weeks that followed. Very few segments of the wall remain today but they have become an extremely popular draw for visitors to the city. The largest section can be found at the open air East Side Gallery, although small sections are dotted throughout the city.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Berlin Wall was an 87 mile long concrete barrier between East and West Berlin, a symbol of the Cold War and an embodiment of the so-called ‘Iron Curtain’ between eastern and western Europe.

Originally just a barbed wire fence erected within 24 hours on 13 August 1961, a more robust, concrete version of the Berlin Wall was built on 15 August 1961.

The origins of the Berlin Wall can be found following World War II, when what remained of Nazi Germany was divided between the Allied Powers, being the Americans, British, French and the Soviet Union. Berlin, which sat in the Soviet sector, was similarly divided between the four nations.

However, when differences arose between the Soviet Union and the other three countries as to their approach to reconstructing Germany, Soviet leader Joseph Stalin declared the establishment of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) and in August 1961, erected first a barbed wire barrier and then a concrete barrier, closing the border between east and west Berlin to stop Berliners from the east escaping to the other Allied controlled areas of the city.

The Berlin Wall was a matter of great controversy throughout its existence, with world leaders continually calling for it to be torn down, including John F Kennedy’s famous declaration of “Ich bin ein Berliner” and Ronald Reagan’s 1987 speech when he implored, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!".

The fall of the Berlin Wall finally occurred on 9 November 1989 and the wall was almost completely dismantled in the days and weeks that followed.

Very few segments of the wall remain. The largest, 1.3 kilometer, section can be found at the open air East Side Gallery, although small sections are dotted throughout the city. The Berlin Wall is featured as one of our Top Tourist Attractions of Germany.

Photo by Andrey Belenko (cc)

4. Berliner Dom

One of the most stunning buildings in Berlin, Berliner Don is an exceptionally beautiful early 20th century Cathedral built during the reign of Kaiser Wilhelm II. Constructed between 1894 and 1905, this ornate structure is crowned with a remarkable, imposing dome and is now open to the public to explore. It’s the capital’s largest and most important Protestant church and, when it comes to deciding what to see in Berlin, this hugely popular landmark is an absolute must.

DID YOU KNOW?

Berliner Dom (Berlin Cathedral) is an early twentieth century cathedral built during the reign of Kaiser Wilhelm II.

Constructed between 1894 and 1905, ornate and crowned with an imposing dome, Berliner Dom contains the Hohenzollern royal crypt which is the final resting place of, amongst around a hundred others, Frederick William I, Elector of Brandenburg.

Berliner Dom is open to the public for tours and audio guides are included in the admission price. This impressive cathedral is featured as one of our Top Ten Visitor Attractions in Germany.

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5. The Holocaust Memorial - Berlin

History runs to the very heart of Berlin. And though at times the city has been at the centre of great things, the city’s past also runs deeply to darker times. Yet rather than shy away from such events, Berlin has taken a conscious decision to ensure that the horror of the Nazi regime and the Holocaust are not forgotten. Central to this is the Holocaust Memorial - a vast granite maze covering 19,000 square metres which remembers the millions of European Jews murdered by the Nazis.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, also known as the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, is an installation commemorating the genocide of the Jewish people perpetrated under Adolf Hitler and the Nazis.

The Holocaust was an attempt by Hitler to exterminate the Jews and any other people who he considered “racially inferior” in what he called the “Final Solution”.

The Holocaust Memorial is a monument to the six million European Jews who died in the Holocaust. Made up of a vast dark granite maze and a subterranean information centre which has details about the victims, the Holocaust Memorial is a moving site.

Photo by SpirosK photography (cc)

6. The Pergamon Museum

Located on Museum Island, the Pergamon Museum showcases a vast and fascinating world famous collection of ancient artefacts, Ancient Near East and Islamic art. For lovers of history, it ranks as one of the very best things to do in Berlin. As well as a host of incredible artefacts the museum houses monumental structures such as the Pergamon Altar and the Market Gate of Miletus, all consisting of original parts brought from their original locations in Turkey.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Pergamon Museum is a large and varied museum in Berlin housing three different exhibitions.

One of the collections at the Pergamon Museum is part of the Classical Antiquities, known as the Antikensammlung. This collection includes mostly Greek and some Roman pieces ranging from jewellery to sarcophagi, sculptures and even remains from buildings. However, it is the reconstruction of the second century BC Pergamon Altar, one of the sites from the ancient city of Pergamon and with its Hellenistic fresco depicting the battle of the Giants and the Gods, which forms one of its most famous attractions.

The largest collection at the Pergamon Museum is that of its Museum of the Ancient near East or ‘Vorderasiatisches Museum’, which covers over 2,000 square feet and around six thousand years of history. From reconstructions of Babylonian monuments such as the Ishtar Gate, the facade of the throne hall of King Nebuchadnezzar II and the Tower of Babel to ninth millennium BC reliefs from the Assyrian palace of Kalchu, this is a fascinating exhibit.

The Pergamon Museum also contains a Museum of Islamic Art or ‘Museum für Islamische Kunst’ in its southern wing where it displays everything from Islamic jewellery to architectural decorations.

Please note that recent reconstruction projects have meant that some of the exhibits of the National Museum have been moved to the Neues Museum.

Photo by heatheronhertravels (cc)

7. Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church

Originally built in the 1890’s and dedicated to Kaiser William I by his grandson Kaiser William II, today the fusion of Romanesque and modern architecture make the Kaiser Wilhelm Church a fascinating place to explore. Seemingly odd to view from the outside - being as it is a largely 18th century tower with a modern concrete, steel and glass hulk attached - inside the Church is truly stunning, with beautiful glass walls and an epic feel. Truly unique, if you’re wondering what to see in Berlin and are pushed for time, this is well worth a visit.

DID YOU KNOW?

Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church is a Romanesque style church which was originally built in the 1890’s and dedicated to Kaiser William I by his grandson Kaiser William II.

Although the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church was severely damaged in a bombing raid in 1943, during World War II, remnants of its original architecture clearly emerge, despite the fact that it was rebuilt between 1959 and 1963.

In its current incarnation, Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church, with its attached belfry, chapel and foyer is a popular tourist destination, with visitors coming from around the world to view its stunning frescos and its poignant memorial hall.

Free guided tours are available every day except Sunday at 1:15pm, 2:30pm and 3pm.

Photo by CxOxS (cc)

8. Berlin Stasi Prison

An infamous East German prison which operated during the Cold War, the Berlin Stasi Prison is a memorial to those who were persecuted there. Following WWII, East Berlin was under the occupation of Soviet Russia as the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and the Stasi were the official security forces of this state. The Berlin Stasi Prison became the detention centre for anyone considered hostile to the state until it was eventually disbanded in 1989 as the GDR began to falter. Today, the prison is a memorial to those who were detained there and is a stark reminder of the atrocities carried out during the Cold War. Tours are offered and visitors can see a film about the prison’s history.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Berlin Stasi Prison, also known as the Berlin-Hohenschönhausen Memorial, was an infamous East German prison run by the East German Ministry of State Security (the Stasi) during the Cold War.

Originally a canteen, in 1945 the Berlin Stasi Prison site became a detainment camp named 'Special Camp No. 3' run by the Soviet Secret Police. Transformed into a prison in 1947, it was taken over by the Stasi, also known as the MfS, in 1951.

Following the Second World War, East Germany and East Berlin were under the occupation of Soviet Russia as the German Democratic Republic (GDR). The Stasi were the official security forces of this state. The Berlin Stasi Prison in Hohenschönhausen became the remand detention centre of the Stasi, housing anyone considered to be hostile to the communist GDR. Prior to the building of the Berlin Wall, this even included West Berliners, such as the lawyer Walter Linse, who was kidnapped and taken there in 1952.

Once the Wall had been erected, many of the prisoners were attempted escapees. The Berlin Stasi Prison was notoriously brutal, with inmates being kept in tiny cells and subjected to torture to extract confessions.

The Berlin Stasi Prison was disbanded in the autumn of 1989 as the GDR began to falter. It was finally closed on 3 October 1990, when East Germany was once again united with the West. Today, the Berlin Stasi Prison is a memorial to those who were detained there and is a stark reminder of the atrocities carried out during the Cold War. Tours are offered and visitors can see a film about the prison.

Photo by Thomas Angermann (cc)

9. The Berlin Flak Tower

One of the more hidden and obscure places in Berlin to visit, the Berlin Flak Tower is a World War II anti-aircraft station and bunker which can now be seen via organised tours run by the Berlin Underground Association. Visitors can explore three of the seven floors of the bunker and discover the astounding underground landscape and can stare deep down into the very depths of the building.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Berlin Flak Tower in Humboldthain Park is a seven storey bunker originally built under Hitler’s orders to protect Berlin from aerial attacks during the Second World War. In fact, in 1940, Hitler planned to build six such flak towers.

Three flak towers were constructed and, after the war, the only Berlin Flak Tower to survive was the Humboldthain tower. The rest were destroyed and even the surviving Berlin Flak Tower has suffered severe damage.

During World War II the lower floors of the Berlin Flak Tower were also used as a bomb shelter for thousands of the city’s population. Only two floors are currently open to the public and 90 minute tours are provided by the Berlin Underground Association.

If you go, ensure to wear comfortable shoes and plenty of layers as it can get quite cold (even in summer). Visitors must be at least 14 years of age and under 18’s must be accompanied by an adult.

Photo by Leandro Ciuffo (cc)

10. Charlottenburg Palace

Built in 1713 as a summer getaway for the first queen of Prussia, Charlottenburg is Berlin's largest royal estate. One of Berlin’s most beautiful museums, the architecture is predominantly baroque, reflecting the taste during the period when it was first constructed. Today Charlottenburg ranks among the top places to visit in Berlin and visitors can undertake a guided tour through both the Old Palace and the New Wing. Tours guide visitors through the rich family history of Sophie Charlotte, in addition to the property's extensive collection of artworks.

DID YOU KNOW?

Berlin's largest royal estate, Charlottenburg Palace was built in 1713 as a summer getaway for the first queen of Prussia, Sophie Charlotte, wife of Frederick I.

Noted by many as the most beautiful palace in Berlin, the style of Charlottenburg Palace is predominantly baroque, reflecting the taste during the period when it was first constructed.

The palace was designed by German architect Johann Arnold Nering, and completed by fellow architects Andreas Schlüter and Martin Grünberg following his death. As different cohorts of the royal family resided here throughout the years, each expanded the estate as they saw fit, with varying styles of decoration from baroque to rococo, the latter being seen in the New Wing, built between 1740 and 1742.

The palace houses the most extensive collection of French painting from the 18th Century outside of France, and was once famous for housing the ‘Amber Room’ – a vast room with walls covered completely in decorative amber. The room left the palace when it was given as a gift to strengthen ties between Frederich I and Peter the Great, and was lost after WWII.

The estate is surrounded by stunning gardens, which were designed in 1697. The design of the gardens is in keeping with the baroque style of the main palace, and contains an array of geometric designs, a carp pond and a moat.

During the Second World War, both the palace and the gardens were badly damaged and seemed beyond repair, but due to the astonishing efforts of State Palaces Director Margarete Kühn, both were renovated to their former glory. The palace gardens are home to a number of buildings including the mausoleum, which is home to the remains of Queen Louise, and the Belvedere.

Visitors to the palace today can take part in guided tours through both the Old Palace and the New Wing. Tours guide visitors through the rich family history of Sophie Charlotte, in addition to the property's extensive collection of artworks. One is able to view the crown jewels, which are on special display, as well as the Belvedere, the Neue Pavilion and the Palace Theatre, which today is used to house an archaeology museum.

The palace stands as a superb example of life for the royal family between the baroque period and the 20th century. Access to the stunning gardens is free, and a walk through them is worth a visit even if you are unable to venture inside the palace itself.

What to see in Berlin - Top 10 Places to visit in Berlin: Site Index

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Checkpoint Charlie

Of all the things to do in Berlin, Checkpoint Charlie is probably the most over-rated. Despite this, it’s still clearly one of the best-knownof Berlin’s places to visit. A prominent symbol of the Cold War, Checkpoint Charlie was an important crossing point in the Berlin Wall and the only place where Allied forces were allowed to cross the border. It was therefore the most visible checkpoint along the wall, hence its world-renown. It was also the site of many stand-offs between Soviet and American forces, including the October 1961 dispute over the checking of the travel documents of US officials, which culminated in both sides amassing tanks at the checkpoint. Today the original gate is in the Allied Museum and a replica stands on the site which has become something of a uninspiring tourist trap.

DID YOU KNOW?

Checkpoint Charlie was an important crossing point in the Berlin Wall, which separated East and West Berlin from 1961 to 1989.

The Berlin Wall and Checkpoint Charlie were prominent symbols of the Cold War. At the time, West Berlin was controlled by the American, British and French forces and East Berlin by the Soviet Union.

In a bid to prevent the ongoing migration of East Berliners to the west, Soviet leader Joseph Stalin erected the Berlin Wall, closing off East Berlin from the rest of the city.

Checkpoint ‘C’, nicknamed Checkpoint Charlie based on the NATO phonetic alphabet, was the only place where Allied forces were allowed to cross the border and, at its location at the junction of Friedrichstraße with Zimmerstraße and Mauerstraße, was also the most visible checkpoint along the wall.

Checkpoint Charlie was made up of a watchtower and barriers erected by the Soviet forces, while the American forces originally had only a temporary wooden shack followed by a temporary metal structure.

Checkpoint Charlie was the site of many stand offs between the Soviet and American forces, including the October 1961 dispute over the checking of the travel documents of US officials, which culminated in both sides amassing tanks at the checkpoint.

However, it was the tragic death of attempted East Berlin escapee, Peter Fechter which attracted mass protest and some of the most poignant imagery of the time. The teenager was shot by Soviet guards as he tried to flee to the West and lay dying in the no-man's land between East and West Berlin before the world media.

The original Checkpoint Charlie is housed at the Allied Museum in Berlin-Zehlendorf, but the site now displays a replica where the original once stood as well as information about the era. Nearby is a small private museum about the checkpoint called ‘Haus am Checkpoint Charlie’.

Photo by dionhinchcliffe (cc)

German Resistance Memorial Centre

The German Resistance Memorial Centre is a monument and museum to those who fought against the Nazis before and during WW2. In particular, it commemorates the attempted assassination of Adolf Hitler by Claus von Stauffenberg in July 1944, the so-called ‘July 20 Plot’. The museum explores the whole issue of resistance, especially against the Nazis, but also looks at the idea of resistance throughout history. There are audio guides to the site and guided tours take place weekends.

DID YOU KNOW?

The German Resistance Memorial Centre or “Gedenkstätte Deutscher Widerstand” in Berlin in Germany is a monument and museum to those who fought against the National Socialist government led by Adolf Hitler – the Nazis – before and during World War II. In particular, it commemorates the attempted assassination of Hitler and subsequent attempted coup led by Claus Schenk Graf von Stauffenberg on 20 July 1944, the so-called “July 20 Plot”.

The July 20 Plot
Together with a group of civilians and military personnel led by General Friedrich Olbricht, Stauffenberg developed a plot to assassinate Hitler. On 20 July 1944, he successfully detonated the bomb at Hitler’s headquarters, known as the Wolf’s Lair. At first, Stauffenberg was convinced the plan had worked and went on to try and achieve a coup in Berlin, desperately trying to convince others that the Fuhrer was dead. However Hitler had actually survived and, by the end of the day, Stauffenberg and most of his counterparts were arrested as news of this filtered through. This event was made into the 2008 film “Valkyrie” starring Tom Cruise.

The Centre
The German Resistance Memorial Centre is located in the former Bendler Block in Berlin’s Mitte district, once the diplomatic quarter. As the headquarters of the Army High Command under Nazi rule, this was both the site where the July 20 Plot was planned and where its members were executed by firing squad.

Today, the German Resistance Memorial is located on a street formerly called Bendlerstrasse and now renamed “Stauffenbergstrasse”. The courtyard of the German Resistance Memorial Centre, where the executions took place, has a memorial statue. This bronze statue depicts a man with bound hands.

The German Resistance Memorial Centre Museum explores not only the July 20 Plot, but the whole issue of resistance, especially against National Socialism, but also in a wider context. Displaying thousands of documents and photographs, this exhibit offers an interesting insight into different elements and examples of resistance throughout history.

However, the focus of the German Resistance Memorial Centre Museum is the history of opposition to Nazi Germany, including the events in which National Socialism flourished and the attempts made to overthrow it. There are audio guides to the site and guided tours take place weekends at 3pm.

Photo by Francisco Antunes (cc)

The Altes Museum

Berlin’s oldest museum, the Altes Museum houses collections of Classical antiquities, particularly from the Greek and Roman eras. Hosting a range of ancient collections, the Altes Museum is one of the most popular things to visit in Berlin and is part of the National Museum. Even the building itself reflects this theme being as it is built in a style inspired by Ancient Greece.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Altes Museum is part of Germany’s National Museum and is located in Berlin. Displaying part of the National Museum’s collection of classical antiquities, even the building of the Altes Museum has been built in a style inspired by Ancient Greece.

One of the main collections at the Altes Museum is its Etruscan Art. It also exhibits a series of Roman portraits including those modelled on of the sarcophagi of Caesar and Cleopatra.

It is worth noting that the National Museum has made several changes to the arrangement of its classical antiquities collection and many pieces have moved to the Neues Museum.

Photo by La Citta Vita (cc)

The DDR Museum

One of the newest things to see in Berlin, the DDR Museum examines what life was like within the former German Democratic Republic. Through impressive exhibitions, the museum throws visitors into the years of communist rule, which existed primarily between 1949 and 1990. The museum is a wholly interactive experience, wherein visitors enter a genuine model of a GDR estate. Visitors can see how the Socialist ideologies of the Stasi were conveyed through real TV shows and movies, read the diary of a GDR citizen, and even take a simulated ride in one of the beloved 'Trabi' cars.

DID YOU KNOW?

One of Berlin's newest sites, the DDR Museum examines what life was like within the former German Democratic Republic, and provides an incredibly vivid look into this 40-year period. The museum is a wholly interactive experience, wherein visitors enter a model of a GDR estate.

Through impressive interactive exhibitions, the DDR Museum throws visitors into the years of the German Democratic Republic, which existed primarily between 1949 and 1990.

Life in the Eastern Bloc during the Cold War was vastly different to the rest of Germany. The West in particular was heavily occupied by the US military, and the Soviet forces felt it necessary to counter this with a state-owned and run country of their own.

Surrounded by wall of security - both metaphoric and sometimes real - the GDR and its inhabitants were cut off from the rest of the world. This allowed the Stasi to watch over its citizens without interruption. This spying went on throughout the Eastern Bloc's reign, until its economic collapse and the democratic mass movement that finalised its demise.

The museum actively encourages visitors to touch and experience the exhibitions, in a way that few others do. Visitors can stroll through a typical concrete-slabbed housing estate, into the buildings that are bursting with relics and real models from the lives of those who grew up and lived during this time. You can see first-hand how the Socialist ideologies of the Stasi were conveyed through real television shows and movies, read the diary of a GDR citizen, and even take a simulated ride in one of the beloved 'Trabi' cars.

The museum accurately reflects both a fondness for the culture that this period created, as well as emphasising the sinister side of life under the piercing gaze of the SED.

Photo by Olivier Bruchez (cc)

The Neues Museum

The Neues Museum is part of Germany’s National Museum and is home of the Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection, parts of the Collection of Classical Antiquities and the Museum of Prehistory and Early History. Opened in 1859, the Neues Museum was built to bring relief to the over-popular and over-crowded Altes Museum.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Neues Museum in Berlin is part of Germany’s National Museum and, following a reconstruction project, is now the home of the Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection, the Collection of Classical Antiquities and the Museum of Prehistory and Early History.

Within the Neues Museum’s Ancient Egyptian collection, one of its most famous pieces is the bust of Nefertiti, wife of Ancient Egypt’s Pharaoh Akhenaten. It also houses a large collection of Armana artwork.

Further fascinating pieces at the Neues Museum include its display of Trojan antiquities and the prehistoric skull of the Neanderthal from Le Moustier in southwest France.

Overall, the Neues Museum offers a comprehensive display of historical and archaeological exhibits from throughout ancient history and around the world. Guided tours are available and audio guides are included in the admission price.

Photo by Anna (cc)

Zionskirche

The Zionskirche is a picturesque 19th century historic church in Berlin and an exquisite example of the neo-romantic architecture. Founded by German Emperor William I, the church's tower stands 67 metres high and is a popular spot for sightseeing in the city. Still an active church, the Zionskirche is certainly one of the most charming places in Berlin to see.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Zionskirche is a picturesque 19th century historic church in Berlin and an exquisite example of the neo-romantic architecture.

Built in 1872, the Zionskirche is representative of the Historicist movement of its time, and was incredibly important before the fall of the Berlin Wall as a meeting point for opposition groups, often lead by Dietrich Bonhoeffer.

Founded by German Emperor William I, the church's tower stands 67 metres high and is a beautiful example of the neo-romantic architecture that was popular with the Prussian elite, who during 1866 were celebrating the Prussian victory over Denmark. The building's inauguration coincided with the Prussian-France peace treaty of 1873, and so is notable for its immense historical importance. Today the church is celebrated as a patriotic landmark, which proudly stands at the highest natural point in Berlin.

Partially destroyed during WWII, the building has undergone several renovations throughout its history, before being fully restored for a grand re-opening in 2002. Well-known Nazi-opposer Dietrich Bonhoeffer worked at the church between 1931 and 1932, where he taught, preached and held baptisms.

The church played a role in housing opposition groups in the 1980s and the protests that occurred here inspired radical political movements throughout the country. A bronze monument dedicated to Bonhoeffer stands on the west side of the church, and commemorates his extensive work with the local community, in addition to his active opposition of the Nazi regime, which ultimately led to his execution.

Today a working church with a choir singing every Monday and Wednesday, visitors can freely climb up the church tower most Sundays, and guided tours are held on the first Sunday of every month.