Spanish Colonial Sites

If you’re looking to explore Spanish Colonial sites and want to find the best places to view Spanish Colonial history then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

Once you’ve explored the list of Spanish Colonial sites and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring Spanish Colonial sites.

Our database of Spanish Colonial historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other Spanish Colonial sites, remains or ruins, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

Spanish Colonial: Site Index

Photo by jlrsousa (cc)

Alhondiga de Granaditas

Alhondiga de Granaditas was the site of a rebel attack against the Spanish in the Mexican War of Independence.

Alhondiga de Granaditas in Guanajuato City in Mexico was originally built as a granary warehouse and marketplace between 1798 and 1809. However, at the start of the Mexican War of Independence this beautiful building became the site of a major clash between Spanish colonialists and Mexican rebels. In 1810 the priest... Read More

Photo by Ted and Jen (cc)

Casa de Colon

Casa de Colon is a museum of the history of the Canary Islands, particularly as relates to Christopher Columbus and the Americas.

Casa de Colon (Columbus House) is a museum of the history of the Canary Islands, particularly as relates to Christopher Columbus and the Americas. Whilst the current Casa de Colon dates to the eighteenth century, its predecessor was once the seat of the governors of Gran Canaria and a said... Read More

Photo by Veronique Debord (cc)

Casa de la Emancipacion

Casa de la Emancipacion was the site where Peru planned and declared its independence from Spain.

Casa de la Emancipacion was the site where Peru planned and declared its independence from Spain. This occurred on 29 December 1820, after which Casa de la Emancipacion became the home of Peru’s first government. Today, Casa de la Emancipacion is the building of Banco Continental and is open to... Read More

Photo by paulinaclemente (cc)

Castillo de Chapultepec

Chapultepec Castle was once the home of Emperor Maximilian of Habsburg and now houses Mexico’s National History Museum

Chapultepec Castle (Castillo de Chapultepec) is an eighteenth century building in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Park now containing Mexico’s National History Museum (Museo Nacional de Historia). Original construction of Chapultepec Castle began in 1785, but it was only completed after Mexico achieved independence and later refurbished as the home of Emperor Maximilian... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Castillo de San Marcos

The Castillo de San Marcos is a 17th century fortification and the oldest of its type in the continental United States.

The Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine, Florida, is the oldest stone fort in the continental United States. Originally constructed by the Spanish in the late 17th century, the stone Castillo de San Marcos replaced a previous wooden fortification. The need for a stone fort became apparent after the English... Read More

Las Bóvedas

Las Bóvedas were colonial fortifications of the old City of Cartagena.

Las Bóvedas are one of the most famous of Cartagena's landmarks. The literal meaning of Las Bóvedas is 'the vaults', reflecting their original military purpose when they were built between 1792 and 1798 as munitions storage. Indeed the 47 arches and 23 domes of Las Bóvedas were the last Spanish... Read More

Leon Viejo

Leon Viejo was one of the first Spanish settlements in the Americas and one with a turbulent history.

Leon Viejo was one of the earliest settlements built by Spanish colonialists in the Americas. Founded in 1524 by Francisco Hernandez de Cordoba, a leading figure in the development of Nicaragua, Leon Viejo developed into an important centre of trade. When Leon Viejo was excavated, the body of Hernandez de Cordoba... Read More

Photo by kudumomo (cc)

Merida Cathedral

Merida Cathedral in Mexico is the oldest one on the continent.

Merida Cathedral, known locally as Catedral de San Ildefonso, in Mexico is a sixteenth century cathedral built by Spanish colonialists. In fact, constructed from 1556 to 1598, Merida Cathedral was the first such cathedral to be built in the inland Americas. Not only was Merida Cathedral built on the site of the... Read More

Photo by Luigi Guarino (cc)

Museo de los Descalzos

The Museo de los Descalzos is a Franciscan convent and museum with a large collection of religious paintings which was founded in the late 16th century.

The Museo de los Descalzos is a Franciscan convent and museum with a large collection of religious paintings which was founded in the late 16th century. The convent was the residence of Franciscan monks known as "Los Descalzos" (the barefoot) for over 400 years. It was from here that hundreds of... Read More

Museo Popol Vuh

Museo Popol Vuh in Guateala City has an extensive collection of ancient, particularly Maya, pieces.

Museo Popol Vuh is a museum of history and archaeology in Guatemala City, particularly concentrating on the Pre-Columbian era in Guatemala. It has an extensive collection of art from this era, especially Maya art such as sculptures. Museo Popol Vuh is famed for its funerary objects, particularly urns. Museo Popol Vuh... Read More

Nuestra Senora de Loreto

Nuestra Señora de Loreto was a Jesuit mission, now listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Nuestra Senora de Loreto was an important Argentinean Jesuit mission founded in 1610. Unlike many of its counterparts which had to move several times due to ongoing attacks from slave traders, Nuestra Senora de Loreto only moved once. This resettlement occurred in 1631, when the mission transferred to its present location... Read More

Palacio de la Inquisición

Palacio de la Inquisición in Cartagena played a sinister role in the Spanish Inquisition.

Palacio de la Inquisicion is a grand 18th century colonial creation in Cartagena which played a sinister role during the Spanish Inquisition. It was in Cartagena in 1610 that the Spanish Church established its Holy Office, the name given to the department of torture, and it was in Palacio de... Read More

San Ignacio Mini

San Ignacio Mini in Argentina is one of the best preserved Jesuit Missions of the Guaranis

San Ignacio Mini in Argentina is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Originally founded in approximately 1611, San Ignacio Mini formed part of a series of Jesuit Missions of the Guaranis established by the Society of Jesus or ‘Jesuits’. Many similar Jesuit missions were scattered across Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay. The San... Read More

San Juan de Ulua

San Juan de Ulua is a sixteenth century Spanish fort which defended the port of Veracruz in Mexico.

San Juan de Ulua is a sixteenth century fortress in Veracruz in Mexico. Constructed in 1565, during the Spanish Colonial period, San Juan de Ulua was built in order to protect the country’s most vital port, Veracruz. The Spanish used Veracruz to import and house many Spanish treasures and, as... Read More

Sao Miguel das Missoes

Sao Miguel das Missoes was one of five Jesuit missions of the Guaranis granted UNESCO World Heritage status.

Sao Miguel das Missoes was a reduction founded in the 18th century by the Jesuits or the ‘Society of Jesus’ and intended to convert the indigenous Guarani Indian population to Christianity. The Jesuits often found themselves under attack from slave traders and, while the mission was originally founded in Itaiaceco in... Read More

Tenochtitlan

Tenochtitlan was the Aztec capital, established in 1325AD and destroyed by the Spanish in the 16th century.

Tenochtitlan in Mexico was established on an island in Lake Texcoco in 1325 AD as the capital city of the Aztecs and, in its final and most prosperous days, was ruled by Motecuhzoma II, also known as Montezuma. At its peak, Tenochtitlan was a thriving and imposing city with around 200,000... Read More

The National Palace of Mexico

The National Palace of Mexico is an important landmark representing Mexico’s independence.

The National Palace of Mexico, or Palacio Nacional, was originally constructed in 1692 on a site which has been central to Mexico’s governance since Aztec times. It became the National Palace in 1821, following the Mexican War of Independence, and houses the bell rung by the priest and original leader... Read More

Torre del Reloj de Cartagena

Torre del Reloj de Cartagena served as the main gateway to the historic city and is now its most famous landmark.

Torre del Reloj de Cartagena (The Clock Tower of Cartagena) was built over the course of thurty years - from 1601 to 1631 - and became the main entrance to the city. At the time, it was known as the Boca del Puente - the Mouth of the Bridge -... Read More