Roman Sites and Roman Ruins

If you’re looking to explore Roman sites and Roman ruins and want to find the best places to view Roman history then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

The Roman Republic and Empire stood for over a thousand years. At the peak of the Empire, the Romans ruled from the borders of Scotland to the deserts of Egypt, from Spain to Syria and beyond.

Over the centuries the Romans left their mark on the world and today there are numerous Roman sites that can be visited, some stunning monuments known throughout the globe, others abandoned in forgotten deserts or ignored in the very towns and cities we walk day-by-day.

Once you’ve explored the list of Roman historical sites and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring ancient roman sites and roman ruins.

Our database of Roman historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other Roman sites, remains or ruins, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

Explore by country: Roman Sites UK | Roman Sites in France | Roman Sites in Spain | Roman Sites in Germany


You can filter results by country, resort, city or town as well as by date and famous figure by visiting our Roman Sites Search Map.

Ancient Rome: Editor's Picks

Photo by Donna and Andrew (cc)

1. Ephesus

Once a vibrant classical city, Ephesus in Turkey contains some of the best preserved Greek and Roman ruins in the world and is quite simply stunning. A treasure trove for enthusiasts of Ancient Roman and Greek history, highlights include the Library of Celsus, the Temple of Hadrian and the classical theatre.

Ephesus or "Efes" was a vibrant classical city, now bordering modern day Selçuk in Turkey and representing some of the best preserved Greek and Roman ruins in the Mediterranean.  Thought to have been founded in the 10th century BC by an Athenian prince named Androklos, Ephesus grew into a thriving city... Read More

Photo by S J Pinkney (cc)

2. Herculaneum

Herculaneum was an ancient Roman town fossilized following the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD.

Herculaneum was a port town established by the ancient Romans in what is now modern Ercolano, Italy. At its peak, Herculaneum would have had around 4,000 citizens and served as a holiday town for wealthy Campanians and Romans. Like nearby Pompeii, Herculaneum was engulfed by the lava and mud which spewed... Read More

Photo by albertopveiga (cc)

3. The Colosseum

Once the largest amphitheatre of Ancient Rome where gladiators, criminals and lions alike fought for their lives, the Colosseum remains a world renowned, iconic symbol of the Roman Empire.

The Colosseum is a site like no other. Beyond a shadow of a doubt, nothing represents the sheer power and magnificence of the Roman Empire like this stunning piece of ancient architecture. The Colosseum, or ‘Colosseo’ in Italian, was once the largest amphitheatre in the Roman Empire. It was built in... Read More

Photo by isawnyu (cc)

4. Baalbek

Baalbek is home to the largest ever Roman temple and a range of other magnificent ancient structures. It is one of the most impressive Roman sites in the region.

Baalbek is a hugely impressive Roman site in Lebanon which is home to the largest Roman temple ever built, as well as a range of other magnificent ancient structures. Initially a Phoenician settlement dedicated to the worship of the deity of the sun, Baal, the city was known as Heliopolis (City... Read More

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5. Ostia Antica

The site of Ostia Antica contains the ruins of the port of ancient Rome and visitors can view some amazingly well preserved remains of the settlement.

Ostia Antica is an extraordinary Roman site that contains the ruins of the ancient port town that served as the gateway to Rome. Just half an hour from central Rome by train, Ostia Antica has all the inspiration of Pompeii without the throngs of tourists. In fact, if you want to... Read More

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6. La Maison Carrée

The Maison Carrée in Nîmes is a staggeringly well preserved Roman temple, and one of the best-preserved examples of a Roman building anywhere in the world.

La Maison Carrée, or Square House, in Nîmes is a staggeringly well preserved Roman temple, and one of the best-preserved examples of a Roman building anywhere in the world – for fans of Ancient Rome, La Maison Carrée is simply a must-see site. Originally built in 16BC by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa... Read More

Photo by Historvius

7. Umm Qais

Umm Qais, also spelt Umm Qays, houses the remains of Gadara, one of the Decapolis cities.

Present day Umm Qais has within it the remains of one of the ancient Decapolis cities, the Greco-Roman settlement of Gadara. Probably established by the Greeks in the 4th century BC, Gadara was taken by the Seleucids and, in 63BC, by the Romans led by Pompey. It would later fall... Read More

Photo by Wolfgang Staudt (cc)

8. Nimes Arena

Nimes Arena is amongst the best preserved Roman amphitheatres in the world.

Nimes Arena (Arenes de Nimes), also known as Nimes Amphitheatre, is amongst the best preserved Roman amphitheatres in the world. A Roman Marvel Built during the reign of the Emperor Augustus in the first century AD, Nimes Arena is a marvel of Roman engineering. A vast oval with a stunning... Read More

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9. Pompeii

Pompeii was an ancient Roman city whose incredibly well-preserved ruins now form a popular UNESCO World Heritage site.

One of the best known ancient sites in the world, Pompeii was an ancient Roman city founded in the 6th to 7th century BC and famously destroyed by the eruption of the volcano Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. The people of Pompeii were completely unprepared for this disaster and its... Read More

Photo by Vvillamon (cc)

10. Roman Forum

The Roman Forum was the very centre of ancient Rome. Throughout the lifespan of Roman civilisation the Forum served as the focus of political, civic and religious life.

The Roman Forum, or Forum Romanum, was the very centre of ancient Rome. Throughout the lifespan of Roman civilisation the Forum served as the focus of political, civic and religious life. From magnificent temples and triumphal arches to the very seat of power in the Senate house, the Roman Forum was... Read More

Ancient Rome: Site Index

Abila

Abila is an ancient town in Jordan and one of the Decapolis, a federation of 10 Greco-Roman cities providing a defence of the eastern front of the Roman Empire.

Along with Philadelphia, Gerasa, Pella, Gadara, Kanatha, Dion, Scythopolis and Damascus, Abila made up part of the Decapolis, a ten-city Greco-Roman federation southeast of the Sea of Galilee in Jordan providing a strategic defence post protecting the eastern front of the Roman Empire. It was occupied in the Bronze Age... Read More

Photo by Malte.S (cc)

Acqua Marcia

Acqua Marcia is an ancient aqueduct of Rome built in the first century BC. It is one of several aqueducts and impressive Roman sites surviving in Rome.

The Acqua Marcia is one of seven of Rome’s aqueducts which are located within the Appia Antica Regional Park. Built between 44 and 42 BC, significant stretches of this ancient aqueduct, with its monumental arches and brickwork, can still be seen today. However, it is far from its original glory,... Read More

Photo by Magnus Hagdorn (cc)

Aesica Roman Fort

Aesica was one of several Roman Forts build along the line of Hadrian’s Wall. It is thought to have been constructed in the early 2nd century.

Aesica was one of several Roman Forts build along the line of Hadrian’s Wall. It is thought to have been constructed in the early 2nd century - probably around 128 AD. Today it’s remains sit directly alongside a modern farm complex. Unlike other forts along Hadrian’s Wall, Aesica is actually located... Read More

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Aizanoi

Aizanoi houses ancient Roman ruins including a stadium, gymnasium, theatre and an impressive Temple of Zeus.

Aizanoi is a Turkish archaeological site housing mostly Roman remains from this ancient city’s peak in the second and third centuries AD. Amongst its ruins, Aizanoi has five ancient and still used bridges, two Turkish-style baths, column-lined promenades, a stadium, a gymnasium, a theatre and its great Temple of Zeus.... Read More

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Alba Fucens

Alba Fucens is an ancient city in the modern town of Albe in the Abruzzo region of central Italy and is a stunning example of Roman ruins dating back to 303BC.

Alba Fucens has been described as an 'archaeological jewel' and it's easy to see why. It is situated in a picturesque valley at the base of the 8,159ft Monte Velino in the Abruzzo region of central Italy and was a frontier town separating the Marsi and Equi tribes featured in... Read More

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Alcazaba Fortress

The Alcazaba Fortress in Merida was a defensive structure built in the middle of the ninth century which also contains the ruins of several Roman buildings.

The Alcazaba Fortress of Merida was a stronghold built in approximately 835 AD, during the reign of Abd al-Rahman II. This commanding ninth century structure with its twenty five bastions remains today, albeit with medieval additions and renovations. The Alcazaba Fortress of Merida also has characteristics typical of other civilisations, notably... Read More

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Aldborough Roman Site

Aldborough was originally the capital and stronghold of the Brigantes, who controlled vast swathes of Northern England, before becoming Romanised in the first century AD.

Aldborough Roman Site contains the remains of the Roman town of Isurium Brigantium as well as an interesting museum looking at the history of the settlement. Before the Roman occupation, the region in which modern Aldborough stands was ruled by the Celtic Brigantes. The Brigantes were one of the dominant tribes... Read More

Photo by carolemadge1 (cc)

Alesia

Alesia was the site where Julius Caesar defeated the Gauls in 52 BC. It is one of the most famous military Roman sites.

Alesia is an archaeological site on Mount Auxois in the Côte-d'Or and the place where Roman emperor Julius Caesar won his decisive victory over the Gauls in 52 BC. By this time, much of southern France was already within the Roman Empire, having been annexed in around the second century... Read More

Alexandria National Museum

The Alexandria National Museum in Alexandria, Egypt houses one of the world's finest collections of Pharaonic, Ptolemaic, Coptic, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic artefacts in the world.

Opened in 2003 by Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, the Alexandria National Museum sits in the middle of the city in an elegant early 20th century Italianate mansion that used to be the home to the Consulate of the United States of America. The 3,480 square metre museum documents the rich... Read More

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All Hallows by the Tower

One of the oldest churches in London, All Hallows by the Tower contains Roman and Saxon remains as well as other interesting elements.

The church of All Hallows by the Tower has a history dating back to Saxon times and ranks among the oldest churches in London. Originally built around 675AD, the church of All Hallows was actually constructed on top of earlier Roman buildings, elements of which can still be seen today. Over... Read More

Photo by isawnyu (cc)

Amathus

Amathus is an archaeological site in Cyprus containing the remains of one of the island’s oldest ancient towns. It is one of several Roman sites in Cyprus.

Amathus is an archaeological site in Cyprus containing the remains of one of the island’s oldest ancient towns. Known to have been inhabited since at least 1050BC, the origins of Amathus are unclear. It is believed to have been founded by the Eteocyprians and to have flourished and grown. Over time,... Read More

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Ambleside Roman Fort

The remains of Ambleside Roman Fort date from the 2nd century and are located on the shores of Lake Windermere.

The remains of Ambleside Roman Fort date from the 2nd century and are located on the shores of Lake Windermere. Built during the reign of the Emperor Hadrian, it served as a supply base to the larger fortifications at Hadrian’s Wall as well as being used to keep order in the... Read More

Photo by Dominique Pipet (cc)

Ambrussum

Ambrussum contains the ruins of an Iron Age settlement, a Roman staging post and the remains of the nearby Roman bridge

Northeast of the French village of Lunel, where the Via Domitia crossed the Vidourle River, lies the ruins of Roman Ambrussum. This interesting archaeological sites holds three main attractions, the Iron Age defended settlement known as the Oppidum, a Roman era staging post complex and the remains of the nearby Roman... Read More

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Amman Roman Theatre

Cut into the hillside, the 6,000-seat Roman theatre in Amman, Jordan is one of the world's finest examples of Roman amphitheatre architecture.

Built during the reign of Antonius Pius around 140 AD (some sources claim it was during the reign of Marcus Aurelius played by Richard Harris in Gladiator) in the Roman city of Philadelphia - now Amman, Jordan - the 6,000-seat Roman theatre is one of the world's best surviving examples... Read More

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Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls

The Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls was a first century Roman amphitheatre in Lyon. It is one of the surviving Roman sites from the Roman city of Lugdunum.

The Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls, translated as “Amphithéâtre des Trois Gaules”, was an early first century amphitheatre in Lyon. Lyon was once the Roman city of Lugdunum. Whilst the city was founded in approximately 44 BC, the Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls is thought to have been constructed in around... Read More

Photo by Eustaquio Santimano (cc)

Ancient Agora of Athens

The Ancient Agora of Athens was a market, a meeting place and the social, political and commercial hub of the ancient city. It was re-built several times, including by the Romans, from whose era many of the remains derive.

The Ancient Agora of Athens was a market, a meeting place and the social, political and commercial hub of the ancient city. Whilst initial developed in the sixth century BC, the Ancient Agora of Athens was destroyed, rebuilt and renovated several times, including attacks by the Persians in 480BC, the... Read More

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Ancient Bosra

Ancient Bosra contains a number of spectacular historic remains, chief of which is the incredible 2nd century AD Roman Theatre.

The ruins of ancient Bosra are among the most spectacular historic remains in Syria. Among the sites to see in Bosra is the incredible 2nd century AD Bosra Theatre along with a host of Nabatean, Roman, Byzantine and early Muslim structures. The ancient city itself dates back far into antiquity, with... Read More

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Antalya Museum

The Antalya Museum contains thousands of ancient and prehistoric artifacts.

The Antalya Museum (Antalya Muzesi) is an archaeological museum in one of Turkey’s most popular resorts. It contains thousands of ancient and prehistoric artifacts and good explanations of their history. It is one of Turkey’s largest museums. The pieces at the Antalya Museum come from a variety of sites around Turkey... Read More

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Apamea

Apamea is an ancient site in Syria which boasts a remarkable 1800 metres of Roman colonnades - it is one of the most dramatic Roman sites in the world.

Apamea (Afamia) is an ancient site in Syria which boasts a remarkable 1800 metres of dramatic Roman colonnades together with a range of other ruins. Said to have been one of the largest Seleucid cities and built in around the 4th century BC in what is now Syria, Apamea... Read More

Photo by Ken and Nyetta (cc)

Aphrodisias

The ancient city of Aphrodisias was named after the Goddess of Love; Aphrodite. Established in what is now modern day Turkey in the 6th century BC, it expanded into the thriving capital of the surrounding region.

Aphrodisias was once a thriving Hellenic and Roman city in what is now modern day Turkey. Today it is an archaeological site, whose ruins include the remains of a beautiful ancient stadium. Established during the late Hellenistic period, Aphrodisias became a prosperous city under Roman rule from the 1st to the... Read More

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Aptera

Aptera contains an array of interesting Greco-Roman ruins, the highlight of which are probably the well-preserved Roman cisterns.

The archaeological site of Aptera contains an array of interesting Greco-Roman ruins, the highlight of which is probably the remains of the Roman cisterns which originally supplied water to the city’s baths. Founded around the 7th century BC, Aptera became one of the most important cities of western Crete and grew... Read More

Aquileia Archaeological Area

The Aquileia Archaeological Area is home to the remains of an affluent Roman trading port.

Aquileia in northern Italy’s Udine province was an important and affluent Roman trading port now famed for its archaeological sites and particularly it Patriarchal Basilica. Founded in 181BC, the Romans only intended Aquileia to be a colony, but its excellent links meant that by 90BC it was a thriving municipium, with... Read More

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Aquileia Basilica

The Aquileia Basilica has a history dating back to the Romans.

The Aquileia Basilica - Basilica of Santa Maria Assunta - in northern Italy played an important role in spreading Christianity from as early as the fourth century. Originally constructed in 313 AD by Bishop Teodoro, much of Aquileia’s Basilica was destroyed by Attila and his Huns in 452AD. Today’s Aquileia... Read More

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Aquincum

Aquincum is a large Ancient Roman site in Budapest housing the remains of part of what was an important military base and city.

Aquincum is a large Ancient Roman site in Budapest housing the remains of part of what was an important military base and city. Most of the sites at Aquincum date back to the second century AD, when the city reached its peak with up to 40,000 inhabitants and as the... Read More

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Arbeia Roman Fort

Arbeia Roman Fort was one of the wall forts of Hadrian’s Wall and a military supply base for the other forts.

Arbeia Roman Fort was built in around 160 AD and guarded Hadrian’s Wall and the entrance to the River Tyne. One of many wall forts along the wall, Arbeia Roman Fort also acted as a military supply base. Today, Arbeia Roman Fort has been partially reconstructed, allowing visitors to really experience... Read More

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Arch of Augustus - Rimini

The Arch of Augustus in Rimini was built to honour the first emperor of the Roman Empire.

The Arch of Augustus in Rimini, known as Arco d'Augusto, is an Ancient Roman monument constructed in 27 BC for the Rome’s first emperor. Thought to have been the gateway to Ancient Rimini which would have formed part of the city walls, the Arch of Augustus is a fairly ornate... Read More

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Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine was a triumphal arch built by the Emperor Constantine the Great in 315AD.

The Arch of Constantine was a triumphal arch built by the Roman Emperor Constantine I, also known as Constantine the Great, in 315AD. Erected to commemorate Constantine’s victory at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312AD, the Arch of Constantine contains an inscription dedicated to the emperor which can still be... Read More

Arch of Germanicus

The Arch of Germanicus is a Roman arch constructed in 19AD to honour Emperor Tiberius, his son Drusus and his adopted son Germanicus.

The Arch of Germanicus (Arc de Germanicus) is a Roman era arch in Saintes which was constructed in 19AD. The arch was built to honour Roman Emperor Tiberius, his son Drusus and his adopted son Germanicus. Germanicus was the nephew of Tiberius and brother to Emperor Claudius. He was a successful... Read More

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Arch of Hadrian - Athens

The Arch of Hadrian of Athens is a triumphal gateway built in the second century AD.

The Arch of Hadrian of Athens is a triumphal gateway built in the second century AD (circa 132 AD). This is definitely not the most impressive of ancient gateways, its Pentelic marble now damaged by years of exposure to pollution.... Read More

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Arch of Janus

The Arch of Janus is an Ancient Roman triumphal arch in Rome.

The Arch of Janus in Rome is an ancient Roman monument which is exceptional for being the only remaining triumphal arch in the city to have four faces, a design feature known as Quadrifrons. Constructed in the early fourth century AD, the Arch of Janus was located at the periphery of... Read More

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Arch of Marcus Aurelius

The Arch of Marcus Aurelius is an Ancient Roman site in Tripoli, Libya.

The Arch of Marcus Aurelius was once part of the Ancient Roman city of Oea which was founded by the Phoenicians in the 7th century BC and later conquered by the Romans. The Arch of Marcus Aurelius was built around 165AD to celebrate the victories of the emperor’s brother, Lucius Verus... Read More

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Arch of Septimius Severus

The Arch of Septimus Severus is a Roman triumphal arch built by the Emperor Septimus Severus to celebrate his military victories.

The Arch of Septimius Severus is a Roman triumphal arch built by the Emperor Septimius Severus to celebrate his military victories. Located in the Roman Forum, the Arch of Septimius Severus commemorates the short war between Rome and the Parthian Empire, fought by the Emperor between 194-199AD. The brief conflict resulted... Read More

Photo by Sebastian Bergmann (cc)

Arch of Titus

The Arch of Titus is a Roman triumphal arch built by the Emperor Domitian to commemorate the victories of his elder brother, Emperor Titus.

The Arch of Titus is a Roman triumphal arch built by the Emperor Domitian to commemorate the victories of his elder brother, Emperor Titus. The Arch was completed shortly after Titus’ death in 81AD. Though only Emperor for two years, Titus had fought many campaigns under his father, Emperor Vespasian. The... Read More

Ardoch Roman Fort

Ardoch Roman Fort contains the well preserved earthworks of a Roman fort in Scotland, with ditches up to six foot high.

Ardoch Roman Fort, also known as the Braco Fort or Alavna Veniconvm is a well preserved - many say exceptionally preserved - fort in Scotland. The earthworks include six foot high ditches although there are now no remaining wooden or stone structures at the site. ... Read More

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Area Sacra di Largo Argentina

Area Sacra di Largo Argentina is the site of four Ancient Roman temples.

Area Sacra di Largo Argentina is a small, but fascinating archaeological site in Rome. In the course of building works carried out in the 1920’s, four Roman Republican-era temples were found in the square of Largo di Torre Argentina. The remains of the four temples of Area Sacra di Largo Argentina,... Read More

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Arenes de Lutece

Arenes de Lutece was an ancient Roman amphitheatre, the remains of which stand in Paris.

Arenes de Lutece or “Lutetia Arena” in Paris is one of the most important and rare remnants of the Gallo-Roman settlement of Lutetia. Lutetia or ‘Lutece’ was a settlement located on the site of what is now Paris. Originating in pre-Roman Gaul it then became a Roman city. Originally built in... Read More

Photo by M_WalzEriksson (cc)

Arles Amphitheatre

Arles Amphitheatre is a brilliantly preserved, UNESCO listed Roman built sports arena still in use today. It is one of the best preserved Roman sites in the world.

Arles Amphitheatre or “Amphithéâtre d'Arles” is a large sports arena built by the Romans around the first century BC or AD, during the reign of Augustus (27 BC–14 AD). At the time, Arles was flourishing as a Roman colony and benefiting from the construction of several monuments, of which Arles... Read More

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Arles Archaeological Museum

The Arles Archaeological Museum houses an extensive collection of prehistoric and Ancient Roman artefacts.

The Arles Archaeological Museum, known as Musée de l’Arles et de la Provence Antique, displays an array of artefacts from archaeological sites in Arles and in the surrounding region. From prehistoric funereal pieces to Roman statues and mosaics from the nearby sites such as the Arles Roman Theatre, the Arles Archaeological... Read More

Photo by Carlton Browne (cc)

Arles Roman Theatre

Arles Roman Theatre was constructed during the reign of the Emperor Augustus.

Arles Roman Theatre, known as the Théâtre antique d'Arles, is an Ancient Roman theatre in the Provence town of Arles which would have been used for a variety of theatrical shows. Like Arles Amphitheatre, it was probably constructed in the late first century BC to early first century AD, during... Read More

Photo by אסף.צ (cc)

Arsuf

The site of Arsuf, also known as Apollonia, contains the remains of a Crusader castle once occupied by the Knights Hospitaller. Also on the site are the remains of a Roman villa.

Arsuf, also known as Apollonia, contains the remains of an ancient settlement on the Israeli coast that has stood for over 1,000 years. Arsuf is best known for the remains of a once-mighty Crusader castle which was once home to the Knights Hospitaller, but the site also contains remnants from... Read More

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Asklepieion

Asklepieion is an archaeological site containing the well-preserved ruins of the birthplace of medicine.

Asklepieion, also known as Asclepeion, in Kos was an ancient Greek and Roman sacred centre of healing based on the teachings of Hippocrates. It seems that there has been a healing sanctuary at the site of Asklepieion since prehistory, but the main ruins today are those of later sanctuaries. The most... Read More

Photo by archer10 (Dennis) (cc)

Aspendos Roman Theatre

Aspendos Roman Theatre is a large and beautifully preserved Ancient Roman site in Turkey.

Aspendos Roman Theatre is a beautifully preserved Ancient Roman site in Turkey. In fact, it seems to be almost completely intact. Still able to seat up to 15,000 people this Roman amphitheatre was once part of the city of Aspendos, which was founded by Ancient Greeks from Argos and... Read More

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Assos

The city of Assos was founded by Ancient Greeks from the 7th century BC. The ancient ruined city is crowned by an impressive temple dedicated to the Goddess Athena.

The city of Assos on the Aegean coast of modern Turkey was founded by Ancient Greeks sometime around the 7th century BC. Today the site, whose modern name is Behramkale, is a beautiful seaside resort littered with ancient ruins dating from the ancient Greek and Roman periods. The city passed through... Read More

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Atrium Vestae

The Atrium Vestae in the Roman Forum was home to Ancient Rome’s only holy priestesses.

The Atrium Vestae or 'House of the Vestal Virgins' in the Roman Forum was a fifty-room palace in Ancient Rome. Originally part of the Temple of Vesta, the Atrium Vestae served as the home of the priestesses of the g-dess of the hearth, Vesta. These holy women were known as... Read More

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Augusta Raurica

Augusta Raurica is an ancient Roman archaeological site near Basel in Switzerland.

Augusta Raurica is a well-preserved Ancient Roman site near Basel in Switzerland. Founded in 15 BC, Augusta Raurica grew into a thriving colonia by the mid-first century with a population of over 20,000 people. Amongst its sites, Augusta Raurica has a fifty-row theatre, the remains of several public and private buildings... Read More

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Aula Ottagona

Part of the vast 4th century Baths of Diocletian, the Aula Ottagona is probably the best preserved original structure.

The Aula Ottagona, or Octagonal Hall, is probably the best surviving structure from the Baths of Diocletian. Built in 306AD, the baths were the largest of the ancient world and could hold up to 3,000 people at a time. Today, the remains of the baths can be seen over a wide... Read More

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Avdat

Avdat was an ancient Nabatean city along a prosperous trade route.

Avdat or “Ovdat” is an archaeological site in Israel which houses the pretty remains of an ancient Nabatean city later inhabited by the Romans, the Byzantines and the Arabs. It initially formed part of the trading route known as the Incense Route which ran from the Mediterranean to south Arabia... Read More

Photo by T.M.O.F. (cc)

Aventicum

Aventicum is an impressive ancient Roman site in Switzerland which was the thriving capital of the Helvetians.

Aventicum is an impressive ancient Roman site in Switzerland which was the thriving capital of the Helvetians. It is unclear as to exactly when Aventicum was founded, but it reached its peak between the 1st century BC and 5th century AD, during its time as capital of the region... Read More

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Baelo Claudia

The Roman town of Baelo Claudia in Spain is a well-preserved ancient city which sits on the Andalusian coast, providing a beautiful backdrop to these ancient remains.

The Roman city of Baelo Claudia in Andalusia is one of the best surviving examples of an ancient Roman town in Spain. Sitting directly on the coast, Baelo Claudia is a beautiful site to visit, with both stunning views and ancient ruins. The remains of Baelo Claudia, near the modern town... Read More

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Baia

Baia was once the summer retreat of Ancient Rome’s elite and is now an archaeological park outside Naples.

Baia, also known as Baiae, is an impressive archaeological complex in Campania in Italy housing the remains of a series of summer homes of the leaders of Ancient Rome. Development began in Baia in the second century BC, during the republican era and continued into the imperial age, when the Emperor... Read More

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Bar Hill Fort

Bar Hill Fort was one of the Roman forts along The Antonine Wall.

Bar Hill Fort was one of the forts along The Antonine Wall, a second century Roman defensive wall in Scotland. Today, visitors can still discern parts of Bar Hill Fort - once this wall’s highest fort - including its bath complex. It is also a double treat for history buffs, as... Read More

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Barbegal Aqueduct and Mill

The fascinating Roman site at Barbegal contains the ruins of an ancient water-mill and gives crucial insight into Roman use of water-powered engineering.

The fascinating Barbegal Aqueduct and Mill archaeological site contains the ruins of an ancient water-powered milling complex and gives crucial insight into Roman use of water-powered engineering. Not a technology often associated with the Romans, the Barbegal Mill demonstrates that far from being ignorant of such technology, the Romans actually pioneered... Read More

Photo by David Paul Ohmer (cc)

Basilica Aemelia

Basilica Aemelia was a commercial building of Ancient Rome located in the Forum.

Basilica Aemelia was a commercial building in the Roman Forum where the financial professionals of Ancient Rome would convene. Considered to be one of the most impressive of the Forum’s structures, it is thought that Basilica Aemelia was built and rebuilt several times. Its first incarnation may have been erected in... Read More

Photo by Justin Ennis (cc)

Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore

Santa Maria Maggiore is a papal basilica dedicated to the Virgin Mary a.k.a Santa Maria della Neve or Santa Maria ad Praesepem. This is Rome's major or principal church dedicated to St Mary.

Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore (Basilica of Saint Mary Major) in Rome is a Patriarchal or ‘Papal’ Basilica and home to the famed Sistine Chapel. Originally built in the 5th century – from which time it still uniquely retains its structure – this ecclesiastical giant bears the works of... Read More

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Basilica Julia

Basilica Julia was an Ancient Roman courthouse in Rome’s Forum. It is one of many Roman sites which can be explored in the centre of the city.

Basilica Julia, also known as Basilica Iulia, was a civil courthouse in the Roman Forum which would also have housed a series of shops. Initially founded by Julius Caesar in 54 BC, it soon burnt to the ground and was rebuilt and completed under Augustus in 12 BC. In fact, Basilica... Read More

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Basilica of Constantine - Trier

The Basilica of Constantine in Trier was the Roman Emperor’s audience hall and the biggest surviving single room from Ancient Rome.

The Basilica of Constantine or “Konstantin Basilika” in Trier in Germany is a remnant of this city’s prominent Ancient Roman history. Once the place where Emperor Constantine the Great would meet and greet audiences, the Basilica of Constantine was part of the development of Trier undertaken by the emperor from 306... Read More

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Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine

The Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine was an Ancient Roman meeting house, the remains of which stand in the Roman Forum.

The Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine is the largest structure in the Roman Forum and still has part of its roof as well as three of its colossal arches and vaults. Initial construction of the Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine started under the Roman Emperor Maxentius in 308 AD and was... Read More

Basilica of Sant Angelo

The Basilica of Sant Angelo is an eleventh century church partially made up of the remains of a Roman temple.

The Basilica of Sant Angelo in Formis is an eleventh century Benedictine church constructed on the former site of a Roman temple dedicated to Diana Tifatina. In fact, the remains of this Roman temple are incorporated into the Basilica of Sant Angelo in Formis, including its Doric columns and floor,... Read More

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Basilica Santa Maria in Cosmedin

The basilica sits at the Forum Boarium, the ancient cattle market. Many visitors flock here to see the famous Bocca della Verità, a large marble disc that was used in the Middle Ages as a lie detector.

Santa Maria in Cosmedin is a charming 8th century church in Rome commissioned by Pope Hadrian I. The site of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, within the locality of the Forum Boarium, was already home to a charitable food distribution centre and an ancient temple dedicated to Hercules Invictus, which was... Read More

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Bassae

Bassae is an ancient site and home to a famed UNESCO-listed monument to Apollo Epicurius.

Bassae is an ancient site where the Phigaleia built a sanctuary to the cult of Apollo Epicurius. A 5th Century BC magnificent temple in honour of the deity still stand there today. At one time, the Messenians people fled to Bassae, seeking sanctuary there from their war with the Spartans.... Read More

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Baths of Caracalla

The Baths of Caracalla were an Ancient Roman public baths and leisure complex and remain well-preserved.

The Baths of Caracalla (Terme di Caracalla in Italian) are an ancient Roman public baths complex in Rome, the incredible remains of which are one of the very best ancient sites in Rome. It was the Emperor Septimius Severus who began building the Baths of Caracalla in 206 AD, but they... Read More

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Baths of Diocletian

The huge Baths of Diocletian complex was built in the early 4th century and covers a vast area. Today elements can be seen in a number of buildings, including the National Museum of Rome.

Once the largest ancient baths complex in the world, the Baths of Diocletian – or Terme di Diocleziano – was built between 298AD and 306AD in honour of the Roman Emperor Diocletian. Set out along the traditional model of a Roman baths complex, the Baths of Diocletian contained a frigidarium (cold... Read More

Bearsden Bath House

The Bearsden Bath House was a Roman bath complex and is one of several Roman sites making up The Antonine Wall.

The Bearsden Bath House was a second century Roman bath complex which would have served one of the forts of The Antonine Wall. Today, the remains of the Bearsden Bath House - located innocuously in the middle of a modern housing estate - represent some of the best of this Roman... Read More

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Beit She’an

Beit Shean is an immensely impressive archaeological site with remains dating back mostly to the Roman and Byzantine period.

The ancient city of Beit She’an in the northern Jordan Valley is an immensely impressive archaeological site with remains dating back mostly to the Roman and Byzantine period. The site itself has an extensive history dating back to around the fifth millennium BC and was a significant settlement... Read More

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Belogradchik Fortress

Belogradchik Fortress is an impressive fortification in Bulgaria with a history dating back to Roman times.

Belogradchik Fortress, also known as Belogradchik Kale or as Kaleto, is an impressively well-preserved fortification in north-western Bulgaria. It was the Romans who initially founded Belogradchik Fortress as a stronghold from the 1st to the 3rd centuries, building the highest part of the fortress, known as the Citadel. Over the... Read More

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Bignor Roman Villa

Bignor Roman Villa is a large Roman site on the Bignor estate and contains some of the best preserved Roman mosaics in Britain.

Bignor Roman Villa is a large Roman villa site on the Bignor estate. Situated in West Sussex, the Bignor Roman Villa complex hosts the remains of a 3rd century ancient Roman home. The site was developed over two centuries before it was abandoned – probably after the Roman withdrawal from... Read More

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Binchester Roman Fort

Binchester Roman Fort contains the remains of one of the largest Roman fortifications in northern Britain.

Binchester Roman Fort contains the remains of one of the largest Roman fortifications in northern Britain. Founded around 80 AD, the fort could play host to a considerable military force and was an important staging post for the Roman military in the region. Evidence found at the site show that the... Read More

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Birdoswald Roman Fort

Birdoswald Roman Fort is one of the best preserved of the wall forts of Hadrian’s Wall.

Birdoswald Roman Fort is not only one of the most well-preserved of the wall forts of the iconic Hadrian’s Wall, it is also next to some of the best stretches of this 73-mile barrier. At its peak, Birdoswald Roman Fort would have housed up to 1,000 soldiers who were there to... Read More

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Bordeaux Amphitheatre

These spectacular ruins are all that remain of what was once a grand amphitheatre; the centre of entertainment in a bustling Roman town.

Nestled amongst charming French boulevards and cobbled streets is Bordeaux Amphitheatre, also known as Palais Gallien; all that remains of the once vibrant Roman city of Burdigala. Put under state protection in 1911, Bordeaux’s citizens are now working to preserve this ancient amphitheatre, a snippet of a history long since... Read More

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Boscoreale Villa and Antiquarium

The Boscoreale Villa and Antiquarium contains the remains of a Roman villa, destroyed during the eruption of Vesuvius, as well as an archaeological museum.

The Boscoreale Villa and Antiquarium complex contains the remains of an ancient Roman villa as well as an archaeological museum dedicated to this and other ancient sites - including Pompeii, Herculaneum, Oplontis and Stabiae. The archaeological site at Boscoreale was actually home to a number of Roman villas, which were destroyed... Read More

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Brading Roman Villa

Brading Roman Villa was a first to second century Ancient Roman farm on the Isle of Wight.

Brading Roman Villa was part of an Ancient Roman farm on the Isle of Wight and is now an archaeological site and museum. Thought to have first been constructed in the mid-first century, it is believed that Brading Roman Villa was developed into a stone structure by the middle of the... Read More

Branodunum Fort

Branodunum Fort is a 3rd century Roman fort located on the Norfolk coast.

Branodunum Fort is a 3rd century Roman fort located on the Norfolk coast. Built in around 225 to 250 AD, Branodunum Fort is in fact one of eleven such constructs, known as Saxon Shore Forts, found on England's southern and eastern coasts. Like its counterparts, Branodunum Fort was initially built... Read More

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Bremenium Roman Fort

Bremenium Roman Fort was an important Roman outpost and garrison located beyond the major fortifications of Hadrian’s Wall, near modern-day Rochester in Northumberland.

Bremenium Roman Fort was an important Roman outpost and garrison which was located beyond the major fortifications of Hadrian’s Wall, near modern-day Rochester in Northumberland. This heavily fortified garrison site stood for more than 200 years as the most northerly base in the entire Roman Empire. The fortress operated as an... Read More

Budapest Bath Museum

The Budapest Bath Museum houses the ruins of the Roman baths complex of the military base that existed on this site from the first to the fourth centuries AD.

The Budapest Bath Museum (Thermae Maiores) houses the ruins of the Roman baths complex of the military base that existed on this site from the first to the fourth centuries AD. It would have formed part of the Roman city of Aquincum, which served as the capital of the... Read More

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Bulla Regia

Bulla Regia was an Ancient Roman settlement in Tunisia, now famous for its subterranean villas, making it one of the most interesting Roman sites to explore.

Bulla Regia is a significant Ancient Roman archaeological site in Tunisia with a fascinating set of subterranean villas and other monuments. Tunisia was annexed into the Roman Empire in approximately 46 BC, under Julius Caesar. Previously a Berber site, Bulla Regia flourished under the Romans, who built a series of monuments... Read More

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Burgh Castle Roman Fort

The Roman Fort at Burgh Castle is one of the best preserved Roman sites in Britain. The walls of this impressive fortification remain in remarkably good condition - they survive on three sides and stretch as high as four metres.

The Roman Fort at Burgh Castle is one of the best preserved Roman sites in Britain. Built between 260 AD and 280 AD, the walls of this impressive fortification remain in remarkably good condition - they survive on three sides and stretch as high as four metres. Burgh Castle Roman Fort... Read More

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Butrint

Butrint is a prehistoric UNESCO World Heritage site in south west Albania which has been occupied by the Greeks, Romans and Byzantines.

Butrint is an archaeological national park in Albania and a UNESCO World Heritage site, renowned for its ancient ruins dating back as far as the 7th century BC. In fact, classic mythology says that exiles moved to Butrint to escape following the fall of Troy. Originally part of an area called... Read More

Byblos

Byblos is one of the world’s oldest continuously inhabited cities, as attested by the incredibly diverse ages of its ruins.

Byblos (Jbail) in Lebanon is one of the world’s oldest continuously inhabited cities, as attested by the incredibly diverse ages of its ruins. Thought to have first inhabited sometime around the fifth millennium BC, Byblos began as a Neolithic village of fisherman. Over time, Byblos would, amongst other things,... Read More

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Byzantine Museum

With over 25,000 artefacts of national importance dating from the 3rd to 20th centuries AD, the Byzantine Museum is a popular attraction in Athens.

The Byzantine Museum in Athens contains over 25,000 artefacts of national importance and is a popular attraction for visitors to the Greek capital. The museum’s vast collection covers the Early Christian, Byzantine, Medieval and post-Byzantine eras. It includes religious artefacts, stunning iconography, sculpture, textiles, paintings, manuscripts, jewels, ceramics and art. The museum... Read More

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Caer Gybi

Caer Gybi hosts the remains of a small Roman fort and naval base which formed part of the local Roman defences of the area in the latter Roman Empire period. It is one of several Roman sites to explore in Wales.

Caer Gybi in Holyhead contains the remains of a small Roman fortlet and naval base. It is thought that Caer Gybi was constructed to defend against pirates who were operating in the area and this smaller fortlet was probably an outpost of the larger Roman fort at Segontium.... Read More

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Caerleon Roman Fortress

Caerleon Roman Fortress is home to what is said to be Europe’s only viewable Roman Legionary Barracks.

Caerleon Roman Fortress is home to the impressive remains of a first century Roman legionary barracks, fortifications, amphitheatre and baths. In fact, they are said to be Europe’s only such barracks on display. Built in approximately 75AD, the Caerleon Roman Fortress was known as Isca and would have been... Read More

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Caerwent Roman Town

Caerwent Roman Town is home to the ruins of the once thriving Roman settlement of Venta Silurum.

Caerwent Roman Town is the name of the collection of Roman ruins which formed part of the once buzzing Roman settlement of Venta Silurum. Probably founded in the first century AD, Venta Silurum reached its peak in the second century and was home to a range of buildings and facilities.... Read More

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Caesarea

Caesarea in Israel was an Ancient Roman city later conquered by the Crusaders. Being situated along the coast, it is one of the more picturesque Roman sites.

Caesarea or “Keysarya” was an Ancient Roman city which is now a large archaeological site in Israel. It is believed that the city of Caesarea was initially founded atop the ruins of Straton's Tower, a third century BC Phoenician port city. Conquered by King Alexander Jannaeus of the Hasmonean Kingdom in... Read More

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Cagliari Amphitheatre

Cagliari Amphitheatre is a rock-hewn Roman amphitheatre dating to the second century AD.

Cagliari Amphitheatre is a rock-hewn Roman amphitheatre dating to the second century AD. The origins of Cagliari Amphitheatre are obscure, though it is thought to have been built around the 2nd century AD and was certainly in use by the mid-3rd century, as referenced by ancient authors. Cut directly into the... Read More

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Cairo Museum of Egyptian Antiquities

The Cairo Museum of Egyptian Antiquities contains the most comprehensive and important collection of Ancient Egyptian artefacts in the world.

The Cairo Museum of Egyptian Antiquities contains the most comprehensive and important collection of Ancient Egyptian artefacts in the world. Indeed, it is said to have over 100,000 pieces in all. From smaller objects such as coins and piece of papyrus to statues of pharaohs and the magnificence of the Royal... Read More

Campania Amphitheatre

Campania Amphitheatre was second in size only to Rome’s Colosseum.

Campania Amphitheatre (Anfiteatro Campano) in Santa Maria Capua Vetere was the second largest amphitheatre in the Roman Empire after the Colosseum. At its zenith, Campania Amphitheatre would have been a grand four-tiered structure able to seat up to 60,000 people and adorned with beautiful monuments from columns to sculptures. Located in... Read More

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Cannae Battlefield

Cannae Battlefield is the location of Hannibal’s greatest victory in 216 BC over a huge Roman army led Consuls Varro and Paullus.

Cannae Battlefield marks the site of the famous Battle of Cannae, fought in 216 BC between Hannibal of Carthage and a huge Roman army led by Consuls Varro and Paullus. It stands as Hannibal’s greatest victory and Rome’s greatest defeat. However, not even this massive loss of life stopped the... Read More

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Cappadocia Underground Cities

The Cappadocia Underground Cities are incredible Christian subterranean fortified cities in Turkey protected by UNESCO.

The Cappadocia Underground Cities, found mostly in the Nevsehir region in central Turkey, are a series of magnificent subterranean cities built by the Troglodytes or ‘cave goers’. Of the almost forty known Cappadocia underground cities, some in Nevshir are open to the public, including Kaymaklı, Derinkuyu, Özkonak, Mazi and Ürgüp. These... Read More

Capua Archaeological Museum

Capua Archaeological Museum houses a collection of ancient artefacts and is next to an ancient Mithraeum.

Capua Archaeological Museum in Santa Maria Capua Vetere displays a series of artefacts from around the region including from the Bronze Age, Iron Age, the Etruscan civilisation, Ancient Greek and Roman objects. Adjacent to the Capua Archaeological Museum is a second century Mithraeum, a subterranean temple of the Persian cult of... Read More

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Capua Gladiator Museum

Capua Gladiator Museum is a small archaeological museum connected to Campania Amphitheatre.

The Gladiator Museum of Santa Maria Capua Vetere is a small museum exploring the history of the adjacent Campania Amphitheatre, including exhibitions of dioramas showing how it would have looked at its peak and also original artefacts found at the site itself including gladiatorial weapons. Comprised of two rooms, the Gladiator... Read More

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Carcassonne

Carcassonne is a UNESCO listed fortified town in France with a history dating back to before the Roman era.

Carcassonne, known as “La Cite” is a fortified town in southern France whose important strategic position between the Mediterranean and the Atlantic led to it being inhabited since before the Ancient Roman era. Carcassonne is believed to have first been a hill fort known as an “oppidum” created in the sixth... Read More

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Cardiff Castle

Cardiff Castle is a medieval complex comprised of a range of styles and with a diverse history dating back to the Romans.

Cardiff Castle is a medieval complex comprised of a range of styles and with a diverse history. With its good access to the sea, the site of Cardiff Castle was first home to a succession of Roman forts, initially built in the mid first century AD. In the eleventh century, the... Read More

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Carnuntum

Carnuntum Archaeological Park contains reconstructed and original ruins from this once-thriving and strategically important Roman city.

Carnuntum Archaeological Park in Austria contains both reconstructed and original remains from this once-thriving and strategically vital Roman city. The site is made up of a number of different attractions spread across a rather large area. Fascinating Roman ruins sit amongst restored and entirely reconstructed buildings, designed to bring visitors back... Read More

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Carranque Archaeological Park

Carranque Archaeological Park contains a series of Ancient Roman ruins built in the fourth century AD.

Carranque Archaeological Park (Parque Arqueologico de Carranque) contains a series of Ancient Roman ruins built in the fourth century AD. The site is believed to have a connection with Emperor Theodosius I the Great. Carranque Archaeological Park is mainly comprised of a well preserved villa - known as the Materno Villa - as... Read More

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Carrhae Battlefield

Carrhae Battlefield was the setting for one of the most crushing Roman defeats, inflicted at the hands of the Parthians.

Carrhae Battlefield near the modern town of Harran in Turkey was the setting for one of the most crushing Roman defeats, inflicted at the hands of the Parthians. The battle took place in May 53 BC and was the culmination of a Roman invasion of Parthia, led by the wealthy Roman... Read More

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Carthage

Carthage was once one of the most powerful cities of the ancient world. Today, the ruins of ancient Carthage can be found on the outskirts of modern day Tunis.

Carthage was one of the most powerful cities of the ancient world and spawned the powerful Carthaginian Empire which dominated much of the western Mediterranean. The ruins of this famed city can be found on the outskirts of modern day Tunis. Carthage itself was central to the history of the ancient... Read More

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Carthage National Museum

Carthage National Museum contains a wide selection of artefacts and exhibitions from the Punic, Roman and Byzantine periods of Carthage. It is a good place to begin you exploration of the ruins of this ancient city.

Carthage National Museum - sometimes simply called Carthage Museum - is one of the most important museums in Tunis and contains a range of interesting exhibitions and artefacts from the Carthaginian and Roman periods. Amongst the many exhibits are displays examining life in ancient Carthage, the conflicts with the... Read More

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Carthage Punic Port and Museum

The Carthage Punic Port and Museum hold the remains of the ancient military naval base of the Punic city of Carthage.

The Carthage Punic Port and Punic Port Museum can be found in the area of the ancient Carthaginian harbour near modern day Tunis. This ancient superpower built its reputation on its mastery of the seas and the ancient Port of Carthage would have once help over two hundred of... Read More

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Carthage Roman Theatre and Odeon

The Roman Theatre and Odeon in Carthage are the remains of the ancient public buildings which once held more than 5,000 spectators. The theatre has been significantly restored.

The Roman Theatre of Carthage is a restored ancient Roman theatre complex in Tunis which is now used to host a range of events. Originally built during the time of Roman control of Carthage, the theatre is believed to have been destroyed during the Vandal invasions of the... Read More

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Carthage Roman Villas and Kobba Bent el Rey

This site contains the well preserved remains of the wealthier elements of Roman Carthage, including a 4th century underground villa.

The Carthage Roman Villas site holds the ruins of a number of Roman luxury houses and Roman insulae - or apartment blocks. The area is believed to have housed some of the wealthier inhabitants of Roman Carthage and is thought to have suffered during the Vandal invasions. ... Read More

Casa Romana - Kos

Casa Romana is a third century Ancient Roman villa in Kos and one of several Roman sites on the island.

Casa Romana is a third century Ancient Roman villa in Kos. With its 36 rooms, Casa Romana would certainly have been luxurious. It was also built atop an earlier Hellenistic villa, probably from the first century. Across from Casa Romana are the ruins of the second century Temple of Dionysus, not... Read More

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Castel Sant Angelo

Castel Sant Angelo was the tomb of the Roman Emperor Hadrian later used as a fort.

Castel Sant Angelo in Rome was originally constructed as the magnificent Mausoleum of Hadrian, the fourteenth emperor of Rome from 117AD to 138AD. It is unclearly as to exactly when Castel Sant Angelo was built, but most sources date it to between 123 and 139 AD. A fortress-like structure, successive Roman... Read More

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Castelo de Almourol

The Castle of Almourol is a medieval castle built by the Knights Templar on an islet in the Tagus River.

Almourol Castle was built in the 12th century, on an islet in the middle of the Tagus River, as part of the defensive line held by the Knights Templar during the Portuguese Reconquista. Although the site of Almourol Castle had been used as a fortification since at least Roman times the... Read More

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Catacombe di San Gennaro

Catacombe di San Gennaro are a complex of underground tombs in use from early Christianity to medieval times.

The Catacombs of San Gennaro are an incredible collection of ancient underground tombs in Naples, some dating back as far as the second and third centuries AD. Located near San Gennaro church, the catacombs were in use from the early era of Christianity to at least the later middle ages... Read More

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Catacombs of Kom ash-Shuqqafa

The Catacombs of Kom ash-Shuqqafa are underground Ancient Roman tombs in Alexandria, Egypt. One of many underground Roman sites that are interesting to visit.

The Catacombs of Kom ash-Shuqqafa in Alexandria, Egypt, are an incredible set of subterranean Ancient Roman tombs. Made up of three levels containing 300 bodies, the Catacombs of Kom ash-Shuqqafa represent the true sophistication of Ancient Roman engineering. Built in around the second century AD, the Catacombs of Kom ash-Shuqqafa comprise a... Read More

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Catacombs of San Callisto

The Catacombs of San Callisto are the largest and most famous of Rome’s Christian catacombs.

The Catacombs of San Callisto are just one of the many catacombs of Rome, five of which are regularly open to the public. These Catacombs were used by Christians as subterranean burial places. Built in around 150 AD, the Catacombs of San Callisto span five floors and hold over half... Read More

Cawthorn Roman Camps

The Cawthorn Roman Camps are the remains of a late 1st / early 2nd century AD Roman military enclosure situated in the south of the North York Moors.

The Cawthorn Roman Camps are the remains of a Roman military enclosure situated in the south of the North York Moors. Today, little remains of the site apart from the earthworks which were constructed at the perimeter of the camps. The Cawthorn Roman Camps probably date from the late 1st and... Read More

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Celtic hillfort of Otzenhausen

The Celtic hillfort of Otzenhausen contains the remains of an ancient fortification in Germany, thought to have been constructed by the Treveri tribe.

The Celtic hillfort of Otzenhausen contains the remains of an ancient fortification in Germany, thought to have been constructed by the Treveri tribe. The hillfort is positioned at the edge of the Hunsrück Nature Park, and their considerable height and location gives them a dominant view of the surrounding area -... Read More

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Cerro da Vila

Cerro da Vila is an Ancient Roman site housing the remains of a second or third century villa complex.

Cerro da Vila is an Ancient Roman site housing the remains of a second or third century villa complex including baths and mosaics. Whilst mainly a Roman site, it is thought that Cerro da Vila was inhabited until the eleventh century. As such, the museum at Cerro da Vila exhibits not... Read More

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Chedworth Roman Villa

Chedworth Roman Villa is a well-preserved Ancient Roman house in the Cotswolds. It is one of several Roman sites in the area.

Chedworth Roman Villa was a luxurious and vast home believed to have been built in around 120 AD, at which time this would have been a typical stately home. Constructed with a central courtyard, Chedworth Roman Villa is comprised of a series of rooms containing several stunning mosaics, ancient relics and... Read More

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Chester Roman Amphitheatre

Chester Roman Amphitheatre is Britain’s largest known Roman amphitheatre.

Chester Roman Amphitheatre is Britain’s largest known Roman amphitheatre. Originally part of the Roman settlement of ‘Deva’ which was founded in around 79AD and is now modern day Chester, Chester Roman Amphitheatre would have been able to seat between 8,000 and 12,000 spectators. Two amphitheatres were actually built on the site... Read More

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Chester Roman Gardens

The Chester Roman Gardens are a scenic park complex containing a number of Roman artefacts from the nearby area.

The Chester Roman Gardens are a small garden and park complex close to Chester Roman Amphitheatre which contains a number of Roman finds and artefacts gathered from various sites in Roman Chester. Originally built in the early 1950s, the gardens were re-designed in 2001 and now provide a scenic spot... Read More

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Chesters Roman Fort

Chester’s Roman Fort was part of Hadrian’s Wall and is a now a well-preserved archaeological site.

Chesters Roman Fort, originally known as Cilurnum, was built as part of Hadrian’s Wall, the famous 73-mile barrier constructed under the remit of the Emperor Hadrian from 122 AD. The role of the 600 soldiers garrisoned at Chesters Roman Fort was to guard a bridge across the Rover Tyne which... Read More

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Christian Necropolis of Pecs

The Christian Necropolis of Pecs is a fourth century Roman mausoleum, the ruins of which are UNESCO listed.

The Christian Necropolis of Pecs is a fourth century Roman mausoleum in Hungary, the ruins of which are UNESCO listed. A remnant of what was the Roman town of Sopianae, one aspect which makes the Christian Necropolis of Pecs special is its unique architecture. The site is made up two... Read More

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Church of the Annunciation - Nazareth

The Church of the Annunciation is believed to be the site where Gabriel told Mary she was to conceive the son of G-d.

The Church of the Annunciation, often called the Basilica of the Annunciation, is located in Nazareth on the site where it is believed that the angel Gabriel told Mary that she was to miraculously conceive the son of G-d. This holy Christian event is known as the Annunciation. While the structure... Read More

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Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Built on the believed site of the crucifixion, tomb and resurrection of Jesus Christ, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is possibly the holiest site in Christianity.

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem is holiest site in Christianity due the fact that it encompasses what are thought to be the last five stations travelled through by Christ, ending in his crucifixion. Built in 325/6AD by Roman Emperor Constantine I (the first such emperor to convert to Christianity), the... Read More

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Church of the Nativity

The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is believed to have been the site of the birthplace of Jesus Christ.

The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is one of the oldest Christian churches in existence and is believed to be located on the site where Jesus Christ was born. The first church on this site is thought to have been built by Roman Emperor Constantine and his mother St. Helena... Read More

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Church of the Primacy of St. Peter

The Church of the Primacy of St. Peter in Tabgha is where Jesus is said to have reinstated Peter.

The Church of the Primacy of St. Peter is a Franciscan Chapel in Tabgha in Israel built in 1933 on the site where Jesus is believed to have reinstated Peter as the head of the Apostles. This was the third time that Jesus had appeared to his disciples. Parts of the... Read More

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Chysauster Village

Chysauster Ancient Village contains the ruins of an Iron Age settlement in Cornwall, which is operated by English Heritage.

Chysauster Ancient Village contains the ruins of a late Iron Age and Romano-British settlement in Cornwall, which is operated by English Heritage. It is believed that Chysauster was inhabited from about 100 BC until the 3rd century AD and was primarily an agricultural settlement. This late Iron Age village is believed... Read More

Cimiez Roman Ruins

The Cimiez Roman Ruins are remnants of the ancient Roman city of Cemenelum.

The Cimiez Roman Ruins are remnants of the ancient Roman city of Cemenelum and include some of the walls of a Roman baths complex and of a small arena. They mostly date back to the third century.... Read More

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Circo Romano de Toledo

Circo Romano de Toledo is a site which houses the ruins of a Roman circus in Toledo, Spain.

Circo Romano de Toledo (Roman circus of Toledo) stands just outside the (also Roman) walls of this Spanish city. Toledo was once the Roman city of Toletum and was an important regional centre and capital of the Roman province of Carthaginensis. Very little remains of this site, but it is thought... Read More

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Circus Maximus

The Circus Maximus was the main sports stadium of Ancient Rome and is one of the most famous Roman sites.

The Circus Maximus (Circo Massimo) in Rome was the main and largest sports stadium in Ancient Rome. Overlooked from the north by the emperors’ palaces on the Palatine, this grand arena was the site of exciting chariot races watched by an exhilarated crowd. Built and rebuilt several times, at its largest... Read More

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Circus of Maxentius

The Circus of Maxentius is one of the best preserved Ancient Roman arenas in Rome.

The Circus of Maxentius (Circo di Massenzio), in southern Rome may have been much smaller than the Circus Maximus – only holding approximately 10,000 spectators – but today it has its revenge by being far better preserved that its grander counterpart. Located on the famous Via Appia, the Circus of Maxentius... Read More

Cirencester Amphitheatre

Cirencester Amphitheatre was once a Roman theatre, the remnants of which are located in Gloucestershire.

Cirencester Amphitheatre is thought to have been built in the second century AD and to have had a capacity of 8,000 spectators. The theatre of the major Roman city of Corinium, today known as Cirencester, Cirencester Amphitheatre would have attracted visitors from around Roman Britain. Very little is left of Cirencester... Read More

Photo by Annie Mole (cc)

Colchester Castle

Colchester Castle is a beautifully preserved Norman stronghold with a rich history dating back to Roman times, having been built on the site of the Temple of Claudius.

Colchester Castle is a beautifully preserved Norman stronghold with a rich history dating back to Roman times. Built from 1076 (some say from 1069) and completed in around 1100, Colchester Castle was constructed under the order of King William I for use as a royal fortress. Colchester Castle would go... Read More

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Complutum

Complutum is an Ancient Roman site in Spain which was once an important city.

Complutum is an Ancient Roman site in Spain first conquered by the Romans in the first century BC. Located within the UNESCO-listed Alcalá de Henares, approximately 30km east of Madrid, Complutum offers a number of things to see including its forum and Domus. One of its most famous sites is the... Read More

Conimbriga

Conimbriga is probably Portugal’s best-preserved Ancient Roman archaeological site.

Conimbriga is probably Portugal’s best-preserved Ancient Roman archaeological site, although it has a history stretching back to the Iron Age. In fact, while the Romans arrived at Conimbriga in the late first century BC, the settlement had been inhabited since the ninth century BC. Whilst almost certainly not the biggest of... Read More

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Constantine Baths - Arles

The Constantine Baths in Arles are a set of well preserved Roman public baths built in the fourth century.

The Constantine Baths (Thermes de Constantin) are a well preserved set of ancient Roman public baths in the Provence town of Arles. Dating back to the fourth century AD, the Constantine Baths would once have formed part of an imperial palace known as Palais Constantine. It is also thought that... Read More

Photo by Glen Bowman (cc)

Corbridge Roman Town

Corbridge Roman Town was a thriving Ancient Roman settlement near Hadrian’s Wall and is now an archaeological site.

Corbridge Roman Town was a thriving Ancient Roman settlement near Hadrian’s Wall, yet it was occupied before this iconic wall was built. In fact, before the Emperor Hadrian built his famous 73-mile barrier, Corbridge was the site of several forts. However, once Hadrian’s Wall was complete, Corbridge began developing into... Read More

Photo by igcameron (cc)

Cordoba Roman Bridge

The stunning Roman Bridge in the Spanish city of Córdoba was built in the first century BC and straddles the 657km Guadalquivir River. In season five of Game of Thrones, it doubled as The Long Bridge of Volantis spanning the mouth of the Rhoyne River.

Built by the Romans in the first century BC, the Roman Bridge of Cordoba, as described in around 1140 by Arab geographer Muhammad al-Idrisi, ‘surpasses all other bridges in beauty and solidity'. Rather than simply an object of beauty which it undoubtedly is, the bridge was a vital player in the... Read More

Photo by Alun Salt (cc)

Corinth

Corinth was a major city to both the Ancient Greeks and the Ancient Romans and its fascinating ruins are a busy tourist destination and one of the more popular Roman sites.

Ancient Corinth, the ruins of which can be found in the modern town of Korinthos, was a city of major importance in Ancient Greece and in Ancient Rome. Located in between mainland Greece and the Peloponnese, Corinth was a vital port and a thriving city-state as well as being of... Read More

Photo by Udimu (cc)

Crofton Roman Villa

Crofton Roman Villa in Orpington, London, contains the remains of an ancient house and farm complex originally built in the second century AD and occupied until around 400AD.

Crofton Roman Villa in Orpington, London, contains the remains of an ancient house and farm complex originally built in the second century AD and occupied until around 400AD. The villa formed the centre of a farming estate and was altered several times during its 260 years of occupation. Today the... Read More

Croy Hill

Croy Hill was the site of one of the Roman forts of The Antonine Wall.

Croy Hill was the site of one of the Roman forts of the Antonine Wall, a vast second century defensive barrier in Scotland which ran from West Kilpatrick to Carriden, along what is now Scotland’s central belt. The wall was constructed to control trade and offer protection from the more... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Crypte Archeologique - Paris

The Crypte Archeologique is a subterranean museum housing the remains of Gallo-Roman Paris. Among the lesser-known Roman sites, it is well worth a visit,

The Crypte Archeologique (Archaeological Crypt) in Notre Dame Square (Parvis) in Paris is an incredible site for those interested in the history of Paris. During the Gallo-Roman Period, Paris was known as Lutetia, which developed from the first and second centuries BC. The Crypte Archeologique contains the remains of Gallo-Roman Lutetia,... Read More

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Cumae Archaeological Park

Cumae Archaeological Park in Pozzuoli houses a series of ancient ruins and artefacts and is thought to have been inhabited as far back as the Iron Age.

Cumae Archaeological Park in Pozzuoli houses a series of ancient ruins and artefacts and is thought to have been inhabited as far back as the Iron Age. Cumae itself was a settlement established by Greek colonists in the eighth century BC. Sacked by the Oscans in the fifth century BC and... Read More

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Curia Julia

The Curia Julia was the senate house in Ancient Rome and part of the Roman Forum. It is one of the most important Roman sites to have survived today.

The Curia Julia in the Roman Forum was the senate house in Ancient Rome, built under Julius Caesar and later restored by Diocletian after being damaged by fire. It stood at the very heart of the ancient city, both physically and politically and would have borne witness to some of the... Read More

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Cyrene

Cyrene in Lybia is considered to be one of the most impressive Greco Roman sites in the world.

Cyrene in Libya is considered to be one of the most impressive Greco-Roman sites in the world and one of the best Classical Greek sites beyond Greece itself. Traditionally said to have been founded by the Greeks of Thera in 631BC, Cyrene was a trading hub first inhabited by the Battiadae... Read More

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Delphi

Delphi is an Ancient Greek site once considered to have been the centre of the Earth. It also contains many roman remains.

Delphi is an archaeological site in mainland Greece comprised of the well-preserved ruins of one of the most important cities in Ancient Greece. Archaeologists have found evidence that Delphi was inhabited as early as the Neolithic period and sites dating back to the Mycenaean Civilisation, but it was the Ancient... Read More

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Delphi Archaeological Museum

Delphi Archaeological Museum displays artifacts from the Ancient Greek city of Delphi.

Delphi Archaeological Museum is an historical museum dedicated to exploring the history and exhibiting artifacts from the nearby archeological site of ancient Delphi. Delphi was a major city of Ancient Greece and its sites are themselves popular tourist attractions. Amongst its displays, Delphi Archaeological Museum exhibits statues, sculptures and everyday items... Read More

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Dendera

Dendera, near Luxor, contains the stunning Temple of Hathor and is a real gem amongst Ancient Egyptian ruins. Day-trips to the site run from many Luxor hotels.

The Dendera complex lies approximately 50 miles north of Luxor and contains some of the best preserved and most accessible ancient Egyptian ruins to be found in Egypt, including temples, tombs and even a Christian chapel. The most prominent site in the Dendera complex is the Ptolemaic-era Temple of Hathor. Dating... Read More

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Derinkuyu Underground City

Derinkuyu Underground City is the most famous of the Cappadocia subterranean cities built by early Christians and protected by UNESCO.

Derinkuyu Underground City is the largest and most popular of the Cappadocia underground cities in Nevsehir, Turkey. As with the other underground cities in this region, Derinkuyu was built by early Christians to escape religious persecution. The result is an astounding network of subterranean houses and communal facilities, including food... Read More

Photo by Nick Bramhall (cc)

Dewa Roman Experience

Situated on the site of a Roman fort in the historic city of Chester, Dewa Roman Experience allows visitors a hands-on exploration of a Roman legionary base.

Built on the former site of an ancient Roman fort, Dewa Roman Experience is a hands-on archaeological site containing the remains of this a Roman legionary base. The Roman fort site at Chester was a strategic base for the Roman army circa AD 50. Initially the site had been a small... Read More

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Diocletian’s Palace

Diocletian’s Palace was the place where this great Roman Emperor retired and is now an entire town.

Diocletian’s Palace in Croatia is remarkable in that this Ancient Roman emperor’s home evolved over the years to become an entire town, known as Split. Diocletian was a Dalmatian-born soldier who reigned as emperor from November 248 AD to May 305 AD. He is considered a great reformer, having restructured the... Read More

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Dion

Dion is an ancient city in Greece which became the religious centre of the Macedonian kingdom and now contains a number of Greek and Roman-era ruins.

Dion is an ancient city in Greece which contains a number of Greek- and Roman-era ruins. Today it operates as an archaeological site and museum. Very much a place of religious importance, Dion became the religious centre of the Macedonian kingdom in the 5th century BC as well as hosting important... Read More

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Djemila

Djemila in Algeria is the site of extensive Roman ruins of a former military base.

Djemila in Algeria is an archaeological site housing the ruins of a UNESCO-inscribed Ancient Roman settlement. Founded under the name Cuicil, it is thought that Djemila was first established between 96 and 98 AD under the Emperor Nerva and occupied until the fifth or sixth century. Constructed amidst mountainous terrain, Djemila... Read More

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Domus Augustana

Domus Augustana was the palace of Ancient Rome’s emperors on the Palatine Hill.

The Domus Augustana on the Palatine Hill was a magnificent palace used as the residence of Rome’s emperors. Built by the Emperor Domitian, the incredible remains of the Domus Augustana include a remarkable courtyard with the remnants of a fountain and many of its walls. The Domus Augustana should not be... Read More

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Domus Romane di Palazzo Valentini

The Domus Romane is an incredible Roman site found underneath the 16th century villa Palazzo Valentini, and located close to Trajan's Forum in the heart of what was once the centre of Imperial Rome.

The Domus Romane is an incredible Roman site found underneath the 16th century villa Palazzo Valentini, and located close to Trajan's Forum in the heart of what was once the centre of Imperial Rome. This relatively new ancient site opened to the public in 2010 and is located close to Rome’s... Read More

Photo by EvanManphis (cc)

Dougga

Dougga is an impressively well-preserved and UNESCO-listed ancient site in Tunisia.

Dougga (Thugga) in Tunisia is the location of the extremely well-preserved ruins of an ancient site inhabited by a series of cultures, notably the Numidians, the Punics, the ancient Greeks and the Romans. Dougga boasts a series of impressive ruins amidst its seventy hectares, including a 3,500-seater theatre, an amphitheatre, temples... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Dover Roman Fort

The remains of the Dover Roman Fort represent all that is left of the ancient Roman fleet base which served the large Roman naval detachment which defended British waters.

The remains of the Dover Roman Fort represent all that is left of the ancient Roman fleet base which served the large Roman naval detachment that defended British waters. Known as the the Classis Britannica, the Roman British fleet was headquartered here the first half of the second century AD and... Read More

Photo by David Holt London (cc)

Dura Europos

Dura Europos was a thriving ancient city in Eastern Syria occupied by a series of civilisations, now represented by well preserved ruins.

Dura Europos was a thriving ancient city in Eastern Syria occupied by a series of civilisations, now represented by well preserved ruins. It was one of the successor states that emerged after the death of Alexander the Great, the Seleucid Greeks, who founded Dura Europos in 300BC, locating it at... Read More

Photo by Jim Linwood (cc)

Durnovaria

Durnovaria is the original Roman name for what is now the English town of Dorchester.

Durnovaria is the original Roman name for what is now the English town of Dorchester. Though Dorchester is best known for its Thomas Hardy connections, it remains an interesting town in its own right, having a number of museums dealing with such diverse topics as dinosaurs, Tutenkhamun and military history. The best... Read More

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El Jem Amphitheatre

El Jem Amphitheatre is a magnificent UNESCO listed third century site in Tunisia.

El Jem Amphitheatre (El Djem) in Tunisia, also known as Thysdrus Amphitheatre after the original Roman settlement in this location, stands in the midst of a quiet town. This incredibly large and well-preserved Roman amphitheatre is El Jem’s star attraction and draws visitors from around the world. From the outside, the... Read More

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Eleusis

An archaeological site of great national importance, the Greco-Roman ruins at Eleusis are beautifully preserved and steeped in the richness of Greek mythology.

Eleusis archaeological site contains a range of impressive Greco-Roman ruins, steeped in the richness of Greek mythology. Surrounded on all sides by a thriving modern industrial town, the site of Eleusis is renowned as the home of the Eleusinian Mysteries, a series of annual initiation ceremonies for the cult of Demeter... Read More

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Empuries

The ruins of a Roman military camp built on the remains of a bustling Greek city, Empuries is the only archaeological site on the Iberian Peninsula that boasts such an ancient history.

The site of Empuries in Catalonia contains the remains of an ancient Greco-Roman city and military camp and is one of the oldest of its kind found on the Iberian Peninsula. The history of Empuries dates back to the early Iron Age, but the remains that can be seen today at... Read More

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Epidaurus

Epidaurus was a city of Ancient Greece located on the Greek mainland. Its incredible ruins are a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Epidaurus was a major city in Ancient Greece famed as a centre for healing. Inhabited since prehistoric times, Epidaurus thrived as a sanctuary devoted to the healing deities including Apollo, Asklepios and Hygeia and contained hundreds of spas, the remains of many of which can be seen today. The main sanctuary area,... Read More

Faro Archaeological Museum

Faro Archaeological Museum has a collection of artefacts including prehistoric, Roman, Moorish and medieval pieces.

Faro Archaeological Museum, also known as the Municipal Museum or Museu Municipal de Faro, has a collection of artefacts ranging from the prehistoric to the medieval including the Moorish. Most of the collection at the Faro Archaeological Museum is Roman and includes tombstones, mosaics and other pieces found in the... Read More

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Fishbourne Roman Palace

Fishbourne Roman Palace hosts the remains of a huge Roman palace built in the 1st century AD. Today it operates as a museum and contains information, artefacts and mosaics.

Fishbourne Roman Palace in West Sussex hosts the remains of a huge Roman palace complex which was constructed in the 1st century AD. Built on the site of a Roman supply compound, Fishbourne Roman Palace was a vast and impressive development which would have been built for the very highest echelons... Read More

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Flavian Amphitheatre

The Flavian Amphitheatre is a well preserved first century Roman structure in Pozzuoli.

The Flavian Amphitheatre (Amphitheatre Flavium) in Pozzuoli was constructed during the reign of the Emperor Vespasian, probably in around 70AD. Vespasian, who was the first Flavian dynasty emperor, built this vast amphitheatre – the third largest in Ancient Rome after those of Rome and Capua – in Pozzuoli as it was... Read More

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Flavian Palace

The Flavian Palace on the Palatine Hill was where Roman emperors held official functions.

The Flavian Palace (Domus Flavian) on Rome’s prestigious Palatine Hill was an Ancient Roman palace built by the Emperor Domitian in the first century AD. A place where official functions were held, the Flavian Palace was the public counterpart to Domus Augustana, which served as the private home of Rome’s emperors. The... Read More

Florence Archaeological Museum

Florence Archaeological Museum combines an impressive collection of Etruscan art with Ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman artefacts.

Florence Archaeological Museum (Museo archeologico nazionale di Firenze) offers a diverse collection of antiquities. The most impressive and comprehensive collection is probably the archaeological museum’s exhibit of Etruscan art which includes the world famous Chimera of Arezzo statue dating back to 400 BC. Florence Archaeological Museum also exhibits artefacts from Ancient... Read More

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Florence Cathedral

Florence Cathedral, with its iconic ‘duomo’, is a world famous fifteenth century cathedral.

Florence Cathedral (Santa Maria del Fiore), often called the “Duomo”, is an iconic site built from September 1296 and consecrated by Pope Eugenius IV on 25 March 1436. From its lavish use of marble to its status as the fourth largest church in Europe, Florence Cathedral was always intended to be... Read More

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Forum of Augustus

The Forum of Augustus was built by the Roman emperor to celebrate avenging Caesar’s assassins.

The Forum of Augustus or “Foro di Augsto” in Rome was built by its namesake, the emperor Augustus (b. 63 BC – d. AD 14) following the Battle of Philippi in 42 BC. In this battle, Augustus, together with Mark Anthony, emerged victorious over Cassius and Brutus, the assassins of... Read More

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Forum of Caesar

The Forum of Caesar was the first of the Imperial Forums built in Ancient Rome.

The Forum of Caesar or “Foro di Cesare” in Rome is one of a series of Imperial Forums built by successive Roman emperors. First commissioned by Julius Caesar in around 54 BC and completed in 46 BC, the Forum of Caesar was the first of these forums and was intended... Read More

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Forum of Trajan

The Forum of Trajan was one of the Imperial Forums of Ancient Rome.

The Forum of Trajan or “Foro di Traiano” in Rome was built by the Emperor Trajan from 107 AD and it was inaugurated in 112 AD. Trajan, who reigned from 98 to 117 AD, built his magnificent Forum of Trajan after emerging victorious from several military campaigns, particularly the conquest... Read More

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Garni Temple

The Garni Temple is a Greco-Roman temple complex probably built in the 1st Century AD by King Tiridates I of Armenia.

The Garni Temple is an impressive looking Greco-Roman temple complex probably built in the 1st century AD by King Tiridates I of Armenia with the support of the Roman Emperor Nero. Likely dedicated to the ancient deity Mithras, today the Garni Temple lies about 30km to the East of Yerevan and... Read More

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Gaziantep Zeugma Mosaic Museum

This astonishing museum features thousands of square feet of lovingly restored mosaics from the Roman town of Zeugma.

Forming part of the Gaziantep Museum of Archaeology, the Zeugma Mosaic Museum contains a superb collection of lovingly restored mosaics from the ancient Roman town of Zeugma. The museum itself is an impressive modern construction and a great many of the artefacts it features were excavated from ancient Zeugma, which... Read More

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Getty Villa

The Getty Villa is a museum dedicated to the ancient world.

The Getty Villa is a museum of Ancient Greek, Roman and Etruscan artefacts and works of art. Located in Pacific Palisades, California, it displays a collection of antiquities from each of these periods in a thematic exploration of ancient life, culture, religion and even war. The Getty Villa is itself... Read More

Photo by Fabrice Terrasson (cc)

Glanum

Glanum is an extensive archaeological site of a former Roman settlement near Saint-Rémy-de-Provence.

Glanum was a thriving Ancient Roman settlement, the impressive remains of which can now be seen in an archaeological site near Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. Whilst there is some evidence to show that this site has been occupied since the first millennium BC, most of the sites at Glanum date back to between... Read More

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Gordion

Gordion is an ancient Phrygian city which today contains the astounding burial mound said to belong to King Midas.

Gordion, also spelt Gordium, in the modern Turkish village of Yassıhöyük is home to what is popularly said to be the tomb of the famous King Midas. This ancient city was once the capital of the Phrygian Empire, who ruled the region from roughly 1200BC-700BC. Founded in an important strategic location... Read More

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Goreme Open Air Museum

Located in the picturesque Goreme Valley, Goreme’s open air museum is one of the most accessible ways to explore the region's ancient rock-cut churches.

The Goreme Open Air Museum in Cappadocia includes a collection of around 30 ancient churches, and feels about as far from a traditional museum as it’s possible to get. Easily accessible to visitors, the Goreme valley was the first historical site to be discovered in Cappadocia. The roughly cut rock churches... Read More

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Gortyna

Gortyna in Crete was the capital of Crete and Cyrene during the Roman era.

Gortyna or “Gortyn” in Crete was an ancient settlement originally founded in approximately 3000 BC, during the Neolithic era. However, it was during the Roman era, from around the first to the fifth centuries AD, that Gortyna flourished, with a population of up to 100,000 people. During the Roman period, Gortyna... Read More

Photo by Jeff Marquis (cc)

Grand Roman Theatre of Lyon

The Grand Roman Theatre of Lyon dates back to the late first century BC.

The Grand Roman Theatre of Lyon, known as “Théâtre Romain” was constructed in approximately 15BC and was able to seat up to around 10,000 people. Having been well restored in the early twentieth century, the Grand Roman Theatre of Lyon is one of the oldest structures of its kind and... Read More

Greenhead Roman Army Museum

The Greenhead Roman Army Museum displays a series of artifacts and replicas of Roman military paraphernalia.

The Greenhead Roman Army Museum displays a series of artifacts and replicas of Roman military paraphernalia from weaponry and armour to chariots and wagons. Some of these objects are derived from the collection of Vindolanda, another Roman site which took over the administration of the museum in 1997. Other displays at the... Read More

Guadalmina Roman Baths

The Guadalmina Roman Baths are the ruins of a Roman baths complex in Marbella.

The Guadalmina Roman Baths, known locally as Las Bovedos, meaning “The Domes”, are the ruins of a small Roman baths complex in Marbella. Located near the beach, the Guadalmina Roman Baths are comprised of seven stone rooms built in an octagonal shape and probably date to the second or third century... Read More

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Guadiana Bridge

Guadiana Bridge in Merida was one of the largest bridges built by the Roman Empire.

Guadiana Bridge in Merida, known locally as Puente Romano, is a large Ancient Roman construct which crosses the Guadiana River. In fact, at a length of almost 800 metres, Guadiana Bridge was one of the biggest bridges known to have been built by the Romans. The origins of Guadiana Bridge date... Read More

Photo by Lori_NY (cc)

Hadrian’s Gate

Hadrian’s Gate is an Ancient Roman monument in Antalya built in honour of the Emperor Hadrian.

Hadrian’s Gate is an Ancient Roman monument in Antalya built in honour of the Emperor Hadrian. Hadrian was one of the most famous and important Roman Emperor's and ruled from 117 - 138 AD. He famously travelled far and wide across his empire, and spent far more time in the provinces... Read More

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Hadrian’s Library

Built by the Emperor Hadrian, this ancient library originally housed over 17,000 books, scrolls, documents and papyri. The ruins of the site were opened to the public in 2004.

The ruins of Hadrian’s Library in Athens are all that remain of this important centre of ancient learning, which was built by the Roman Emperor Hadrian between 125 and 132 AD. Hadrian was a great admirer of Greek culture and constructed a number of significant buildings in Athens, including this grand... Read More

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Hadrian’s Villa

Hadrian’s Villa, or Villa Adriana, is perhaps the best-preserved Roman villa complex in the world. The site covers almost 250 acres and consists of over 30 buildings and a number of other points of interest.

Hadrian’s Villa, or Villa Adriana, is perhaps the best-preserved Roman villa complex in the world. Built in the early 2nd century, the villa was the central hub of power in the Roman world for the latter years of Emperor Hadrian’s reign. Hadrian’s Villa covers almost 250 acres and consists of over... Read More

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Hadrian’s Wall

Hadrian’s Wall is a magnificent remnant of Roman Britain and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Hadrian’s Wall is a magnificent remnant of Roman Britain and is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Built under the rule of Roman Emperor Hadrian between 122 and 130 AD, it took six legions to complete this once 73 mile wall – 80 miles by Roman measurements. At the time of its... Read More

Photo by David Spender (cc)

Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia is a world famous sixth century church turned mosque in Istanbul.

The Hagia Sophia, or ‘Ayasofya’ in Turkish, is a world famous sixth century church turned mosque in Istanbul, which now operates as a museum. Whilst the original Hagia Sofia was built in the fourth century AD by Constantine the Great, very little remains of this structure nor the one built... Read More

Haidra

Haidra contains the remains of the Roman city of Ammaedara and includes a number of interesting ruins including the large Byzantine fort and underground Roman baths.

One of the earliest Roman settlements in North Africa, Haidra in Tunisia contains the remains of the Roman city of Ammaedara. Well off the beaten track, Haidra – also called Hydrah – attracts few tourists and even the archaeological excavations have been few and far between. Founded in the first century... Read More

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Hatay Museum

Hatay Museum in Antakya explores the history of the famous ancient city of Antioch. Among a host of other artefacts is a collection of exquisite Roman mosaics.

Hatay Museum in Antakya, Turkey, is a fascinating institution dedicated to the history of the famous ancient city of Antioch. Antioch is now known as Antakya, in the province of Hatay, which borders on Syria. The ancient city was the capital of the historic Kingdom of Hatay, and, along with Rome,... Read More

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Heraklea Linkestis

Heraklea Linkestis is an archaeological site in Bitola in Macedonia which was once an ancient Roman settlement.

Heraklea Linkestis, also known as just Heraklea, is believed to have been founded by King Philip II of Macedon in around the fourth century BC, before being conquered by the Romans in approximately the second century BC. Located along the important trade route of Via Egnatia, Heraklea Linkestis thrived as a... Read More

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Hierapolis

Hierapolis was once a thriving, multicultural ancient city and spa, the remains of which can now be seen in modern day Turkey.

Hierapolis was once a thriving, multicultural ancient city and spa, the remains of which can now be seen in modern day Turkey. It is said to have been founded by the rulers of Pergamum, the Attalid Dynasty, and is usually attributed to their King Eumenes II (197BC-159BC). However, it is... Read More

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Histria

Histria was occupied by the Greeks, Romans and Byzantines and is thought to be the oldest settlement in Romania.

Histria, close to the city of Constanta in Romania is an archaeological park housing ruins which date throughout Romania’s history. Histra was once a harbour, first occupied by the Ancient Greeks in 675 BC. Under the Greeks, it flourished into a centre of trade, specialising in ceramics, glass and metals.... Read More

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Hod Hill

Hod Hill is one of the largest Iron Age hillforts in Dorset.

Hod Hill is an Iron Age hillfort and one of the largest of its kind in Dorset. With its imposing size and ramparts, Hod Hill would have defended a village. In 44 AD, it is likely to have been captured by the Romans during their invasion of Britain. The Roman Second... Read More

Horreum

The Horreum in Narbonne in France are a series of first century underground tunnels.

The Horreum in Narbonne, France dated back to the first century BC and are a network of subterranean tunnel and passageways which were thought to have been used as storage rooms during the Roman era. These unique underground tunnels would once have formed part of the city of Narbo Martius, which... Read More

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Housesteads Roman Fort

Housesteads Roman Fort is one of the best preserved and most important of the forts along Hadrian’s Wall.

Housesteads Roman Fort, originally known as 'Vercovicium', is one of the best preserved and most important of the forts along Hadrian’s Wall. Built in around 124 AD, Housesteads Roman Fort housed around 1,000 troops and remained in use until the fourth century. Visitors to Housesteads Roman Fort can see the various... Read More

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Hungarian National Museum

The Hungarian National Museum is a museum of history, archaeology and art in Budapest.

The Hungarian National Museum exhibits a comprehensive collection of historic artefacts, documents and works of art. Its collections is incredibly diverse, ranging from bone tools from the Palaeolithic era to 45,000 twentieth century posters relating to significant political, social and cultural events.One of the main sections of the Hungarian National... Read More

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Imperial Baths of Trier

The Imperial Baths of Trier are some of the largest and best preserved Ancient Roman baths outside of Rome.

The Imperial Baths of Trier, known in German as Kaiserthermen, are the beautifully preserved ruins of a Roman public bath complex constructed in the fourth century AD. Considered to be the largest Roman baths outside of Rome, the remains of the Imperial Baths of Trier are centrally located within the city... Read More

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Istanbul Mosaic Museum

The Istanbul Mosaic Museum contains the amazing remains of mosaics excavated the Great Palace of Constantinople built during the Byzantine period.

The Istanbul Mosaic Museum, located near Sultanahmet Square in Istanbul, contains the amazing remains of mosaics excavated from the courtyard of the Great Palace of Constantinople. First discovered in 1933 and later fully excavated in the 1950s, the mosaic floors were found under the modern Arasta Bazaar and now form the... Read More

Photo by DODO DODO (cc)

Itálica

Itálica was the birthplace of more than one Roman emperor and includes some impressive ruins.

Itálica near Seville was an impressive city and the hometown of Roman emperors Trajan and Hadrian. It would have been a vital hub in its time, both politically and in terms of military strategy. Today it is a fascinating archaeological site. Established in 206 BC, Itálica was initially founded under... Read More

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Jardin des Vestiges

The Jardin des Vestiges is an archaeological site in Marseilles with ancient Greek and Roman remains.

The Jardin des Vestiges is an archaeological site in Marseille housing the remains of this city’s ancient Greek then Roman port. Discovered during building works carried out in the 1960’s, the ruins of Jardin des Vestiges have been excavated and include large sections of walls, gates and the remnants of... Read More

Photo by archer10 (Dennis) (cc)

Jerash

Jerash in Jordan was once a thriving Roman city and is one of the world’s best preserved and most impressive set of Roman ruins.

Jerash or Jarash, is one of the world’s best preserved ancient Roman sites. Once known as Gerasa, Jerash is believed to have been inhabited since the Neolithic Era. However, it is the impressive Roman city built in Jerash which has left its greatest mark on the area, becoming Jordan’s second... Read More

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Kasserine

Kasserine was an ancient Roman settlement known as Cillium, the remains of which can be seen today.

Kasserine, also known as Cillium, is a city in central Tunisia with several Ancient Roman monuments and ruins. Founded in approximately the second century AD, Kasserine became a Roman colonia known as Colonia Cillilana or just Cillium. Just west of the main city of Kasserine, visitors can see the remains of this city,... Read More

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Kaunos

Kaunos contains the remains of an ancient Carian city and includes a host of Hellenic, Roman and Byzantine remains – particularly its impressive theatre.

Kaunos archaeological site in Turkey contains the remains of this ancient city which has witnessed the rise and fall of several empires, cultures and civilisations over almost 3,000 years of history. Though not as spectacular as many ancient cities in Turkey, it has the advantage of being quieter, tranquil and... Read More

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Kaymaklı Underground City

Kaymaklı Underground City is a large subterranean city in central Turkey built by early Christians and part of a UNESCO site.

Kaymaklı Underground City is one of the most famous of the Cappadocia underground cities in the Nevsehir province of central Turkey. Built by early Christians to protect them from religious persecution, Kaymaklı Underground City is an elaborate labyrinth of tunnels and caves and is probably the widest of the... Read More

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Kerameikos

Kerameikos was the site of an important ancient burial ground.

Kerameikos is an archaeological site in Athens which contains the remains an important ancient burial ground as well as a series of famous monuments. Once home to the city’s potters - hence its name meaning pottery - Kerameikos developed to also become the site of a cemetery. In fact, some of... Read More

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Kinneil House and Museum

Kinneil Estate is a fantastic historic site, centred around the 15th century Kinneil House. Also at the site are a Roman fortlet, the ruins of a medieval church, a museum and the cottage of inventor James Watt.

Kinneil House and Museum, part of the Kinneil Estate, has a rich history spanning almost 2,000 years. The Kinneil Estate holds a wealth of historic sites, including a Roman fortlet - part of the Antonine Wall - the ruins of a medieval church, a cottage belonging to inventor James Watt... Read More

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Kom Ombo Temple

The Kom Ombo Temple is a sacred Ptolemaic temple co-dedicated to the crocodile deity Sobek and to the falcon-headed Haroeris.

The Kom Ombo Temple is a sacred Ptolemaic temple co-dedicated to the crocodile deity Sobek and to the falcon-headed Haroeris. This dual-dedication is quite atypical and is - equally unusually - reflected in the symmetrical design of the Kom Ombo Temple. Built under Ptolemy VI of the Ptolemaic Dynasty... Read More

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Kourion

Kourion is an impressive archaeological site in Cyprus containing mostly Ancient Roman and Byzantine ruins.

Kourion, also known as Curium, is an impressive archaeological site near Limassol in Cyprus containing mostly Ancient Roman and Byzantine ruins. In fact, it is believed that the site of Kourion was first inhabited during Neolithic times, with the earliest evidence dating back to 4500-3900 BC, but that the town itself... Read More

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La Malga Cisterns

Amazingly well preserved ancient storage tanks, these cisterns supplied water to the ancient city of Carthage and, though slightly off the beaten track, are well worth a visit.

La Malga Cisterns are vast ancient storage tanks used to supply water to the ancient city of Carthage. An aqueduct system  - the Zaghouan Aqueduct - that ran for over 100km brought water to the ancient metropolis and the Malga Cisterns were used to store that water and then run it... Read More

La Olmeda Roman Villa

La Olmeda Roman Villa is a well-preserved fourth century AD Roman home in Palencia in Spain.

La Olmeda Roman Villa (Villa Romana de La Olmeda) is a well-preserved fourth century AD Roman home in Palencia in Spain. Spanning 3,000 square metres and comprised of 27 rooms, La Olmeda Roman Villa is best known for its mosaics, the most important of which depict great mythological scenes and can... Read More

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Laodikeia

Laodikeia was an Ancient Greek then Roman city, which is now represented by a set of ruins.

Laodikeia, also known as Laodicea, was an Ancient Greek then Roman city, which is now represented by a set of interesting ancient ruins. Said by some to have been founded by Antiochus II Theos of the Seleucid Kingdom in the third century BC, many of the buildings and monuments at the Laodikeia... Read More

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Lapidaire Museum

Lapidaire Museum is a museum of Ancient Roman artefacts in Narbonne, France.

Lapidaire Museum (Musee Lapidaire) is an archaeological museum in Narbonne, southern France which contains around 1,300 Ancient Roman exhibits. From ancient wall fragments to tomb remains and Roman gravestones, Musee Lapidaire’s impressive displays showcase Narbonne’s Gallo-Roman history. Lapidaire Museum is housed in the gothic church of Eglise Notre-Dame.... Read More

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Leptis Magna

Leptis Magna was once one of the most important African cities of the Roman Empire and is now an impressive archaeological site in Tripoli.

Leptis Magna (Lepcis Magna) is an incredibly well preserved archaeological site in Tripoli, Libya. Originally founded by the Phoenicians as the port of Lpgy in the first millennium BC, Leptis Magna later became part of the Carthaginian Empire and was then incorporated into the Roman Empire in 46 BC. Most of... Read More

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Les Alyscamps - Arles

Les Alyscamps was a Roman necropolis which now houses a collection of crowded medieval sarcophagi.

Les Alyscamps in the town of Arles in Provence is a site imbued with historical and religious importance. Originally an Ancient Roman necropolis where prominent figures were laid to rest, most of the thousands of strewn sarcophagi which crowd together in Les Alyscamps actually date back to medieval times. From the... Read More

Leukaspis

Leukaspis was a thriving Greco-Roman port and city founded in the second century BC. Today, it has been excavated as the Marina el-Alamein Archaeological Site.

Leukaspis (Locassis) was a thriving Greco-Roman port and city founded in the second century BC and which grew to a population of 15,000 residents at its peak. Also known as Antiphrae, Leukaspis was a commercial hub of the Mediterranean olive, wine and wheat industries, conducting trade both inland and overseas.... Read More

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Lisbon Roman Theatre Museum

The Lisbon Roman Theatre Museum exhibits finds from the excavations of Lisbon’s first century AD Roman Theatre.

The Lisbon Roman Theatre Museum (Museu do Teatro Romano) encloses the ancient theatre of Lisbon as well as exhibits and finds from the excavations of city’s first century AD Roman Theatre. Whilst not very large, the Lisbon Roman Theatre Museum is modern and bright. The main attractions are the remains of... Read More

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London Roman Amphitheatre

The London Roman Amphitheatre was built in the first century AD and is the only one of its kind in the city.

The London Roman Amphitheatre was discovered in 1988 and remains the only known Roman amphitheatre in the city. Believed to have first been built in 74 AD, the London Roman Amphitheatre was probably extensively renovated in the second century, in around 120 AD. At its peak, the London Roman Amphitheatre would... Read More

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London Roman Fort

The London Roman Fort was a second century fort which housed Roman Londinium’s soldiers.

The London Roman Fort was built in around 120 AD - around the same time as Hadrian’s Wall - to house the soldiers of Roman Britain’s most important town of the time, Londinium. Covering around 12 acres in its heyday, the London Roman Fort would have been a square complex... Read More

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London Roman Wall

The London Roman Wall was built in around the third century AD and parts of it can be seen today.

The London Roman Wall was built between around 190 and 220 AD and stretched for about three miles from Blackfriars to Tower Hill. This defensive wall protected what was then the important Roman city of Londinium. Prior to the building of the London Roman Wall, Londinium already had a fort, parts... Read More

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Ludus Magnus

The preserved ruins of Ancient Rome’s largest and most prestigious gladiator training school, located next to the Colosseum in central Rome.

The Ludus Magnus was ancient Rome’s largest and most prestigious gladiator training school, located right alongside the famous Roman Colosseum. Originally built between 81-96AD by Emperor Domitian, it was used as a training school for the gladiators who were to fight in the Colosseum. It was later rebuilt by Emperor Trajan... Read More

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Lugo Roman Baths

The Lugo Roman Baths were built in approximately 15BC, around the time when the city was founded and remain well-preserved.

The Lugo Roman Baths were built in approximately 15BC, around the time when the city was founded and remain well-preserved. As with all such bathing complexes, the Lugo Roman Baths attracted Romans by virtue of their believed healing powers, in particular the properties of the water which they drew from the... Read More

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Lugo Roman Walls

The Lugo Roman Walls have been described by UNESCO as "the finest surviving example of late Roman military fortifications", a title they truly deserve.

The Lugo Roman Walls have been described by UNESCO as "the finest surviving example of late Roman military fortifications", a title they truly deserve. Built in the third and fourth centuries AD to protect the Roman city of Lucus Augusti, the Lugo Roman Walls are incredibly well preserved, rising up... Read More

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Lullingstone Roman Villa

Lullingstone Roman Villa is a fine example of a 1st Century Roman villa. Built roughly 50 years after the Roman conquest of Britain, it was home to the wealthier elements of Romano-British society.

Lullingstone Roman Villa is a fine example of a 1st Century Roman villa. Built roughly 50 years after the Roman conquest of Britain, Lullingstone Roman Villa was home to the wealthier elements of Romano-British society. A villa stood on the site for over 300 years before its eventual destruction and abandonment.... Read More

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Lyon Cathedral

Lyon Cathedral was constructed between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries and has a famous astronomical clock.

Lyon Cathedral, also known as St Jean Cathedral or “Cathédrale St-Jean”, is Lyon’s main Roman Catholic church and the seat of the city’s archbishop. Since the eleventh century, the Archbishop of Gaul has also been known as the Primate of All the Gauls, a status granted by the Pope at... Read More

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Lyon Gallo-Roman Museum

The Lyon Gallo-Roman Museum displays exhibits relating to the city’s time under the Roman Empire.

The Lyon Gallo-Roman Museum, known as “Musee Gallo-Romain” chronicles five centuries of the city’s history under Rome. From its founding as Lugdunum in 44 BC under Julius Caesar to how it flourished, becoming a thriving capital of the Empire, the Gallo-Roman Museum houses an extensive collection of archaeological finds from... Read More

Lyon Roman Baths

The Lyon Roman Baths are the remains of a second or third century public baths complex.

The Lyon Roman Baths are thought to have been built in the second or third centuries AD. The ancient bath complex would served ancient Lugdunum, as the city was known during the Roman period, when it was an important regional capital of the Roman Empire. Only found in the 1970’s and then... Read More

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Malaga Roman Theatre

Málaga's Roman Theatre - dating to the 1st century BC - lies at the foot of the Alcazaba fortress in the historical center of Malaga, Spain.

Malaga Roman Theatre (Teatro Romano de Málaga) is a picturesque surviving vestige of ancient Malaga. Constructed in the first century AD, during Augustus’ reign, this picturesque theatre rose approximately 16 metres in high and spanned 31 metres in diameter. In use until the third century, Malaga Roman Theatre was used... Read More

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Mamertine Prison

Mamertine Prison was an Ancient Roman prison in which Saints Peter and Paul may have been held.

The Mamertine Prison in Rome, also known as Carcere Mamertino, is an ancient prison thought to date back to perhaps as early as the seventh century BC. The Romans continued using the Mamertine Prison throughout the Republican and Imperial eras as late as the fourth century AD, with executions also... Read More

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Mamshit

Mamshit in Israel is the site of one of four UNESCO listed Nabatean cities which prospered as part of the Incense trading route.

Mamshit was an ancient Nabatean city which formed part of the Incense Road, a trading route of various spices in the Mediterranean and south Arabia. In fact, it is one of four such cities in the Negev Desert in Israel which form the UNESCO World Heritage site of the Incense Route.... Read More

Marseille History Museum

The Marseille History Museum chronicles the city’s history since Ancient Greek times.

The Marseille History Museum (Musee d’Histoire de Marseille) chronicles the city’s past since its founding by the Greeks in 600 BC up to the eighteenth century. Adjacent to the archaeological site of Jardin de Vestiges, the Marseille History Museum houses a series of finds, including from ancient Greek and Roman times... Read More

Marseille Roman Docks Museum

The Roman Docks Museum has a collection of artefacts from Marseille’s thriving ancient port.

The Roman Docks Museum (Musée des Docks Romains) in Marseilles is an archaeological museum located on the site of a former Ancient Roman dock warehouse. One of the main exhibits is the set of ceramic jugs or “dolia” which were probably made in the Roman warehouse. Visitors can also see the... Read More

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Masada

Mount Masada hosts the remains of an ancient Jewish fotress which served as the last outpost for the Zealots from the Romans in the Jewish Wars.

The fortress of Masada, which rises majestically above the Dead Sea, was originally built in 150BC. The original structure was renovated by Herod the Great in 43BC in order to improve its capacity to withstand drawn-out sieges. In 66AD, Masada was the site of the last stand of the Jewish Zealots... Read More

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Mausoleum of Augustus

The Mausoleum of Augustus was the tomb of Rome’s first emperor.

The Mausoleum of Augustus (Mausoleo di Augusto) was constructed in approximately 28 BC as the tomb of the first emperor of Rome. When it was created, the Mausoleum of Augustus was a large circular building intended to be the final resting place of both Augustus and his family. Those buried at... Read More

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Mausoleum of Cecilia Metella

The Mausoleum of Cecilia Metella is a 1st century BC tomb turned medieval fortress.

The Mausoleum of Cecilia Metella (Mausoleo di Caecillia Metella) is a large well-preserved tomb along Rome’s Via Appia. The Mausoleum of Cecilia Metella is thought to have been built in the late first century BC and incorporated into a medieval fort in the fourteenth century. Whilst little is known about its namesake,... Read More

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Mausoleum of Galla Placidia

The Mausoleum of Galla Placidia is an early 5th century Christian chapel in Ravenna that was thought to hold the tomb of Roman Empress Galla Placidia.

The Mausoleum of Galla Placidia is an early 5th century Christian chapel in Ravenna that is thought to have been commissioned by Roman Empress Galla Placidia and, until recently, was believed to house her tomb. Galla Placidia was the daughter of the Roman Emperor Theodosius I and a major player in... Read More

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Merida Amphitheatre

Merida Amphitheatre is an Ancient Roman ruin and a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Merida Amphitheatre is a reasonably well preserved Ancient Roman amphitheatre in the Spanish city of Merida. The Emperor Augustus (63 BC - AD 14) established the Roman colony known as Augusta Emerita - later to become modern Merida - in 25 BC. Soon after its founding, Augusta Emerita became the capital... Read More

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Merida Roman Circus

The Merida Roman Circus was an Ancient Roman chariot racing arena which remains well preserved.

The Merida Roman Circus or “Circo Romano de Merida” was built in the time that the city, then known as Augusta Emerita, was part of one of the colonies of the Roman Empire. A vast sports arena able to accommodate up to 30,000 people, Merida’s Roman Circus would have been the... Read More

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Merida Roman Theatre

The Merida Roman Theatre is a well-preserved first century BC structure and a UNESCO site.

The Merida Roman Theatre or “Teatro Romano” is one of the most impressive of the ruins of this former colony of the Roman Empire. Together, these ruins, which include Guadiana Bridge and Merida Amphitheatre, form the UNESCO World Heritage site of the Archaeological Ensemble of Mérida. Constructed in approximately 15-16 BC... Read More

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Miletus

Miletus was an important ancient Greek then Roman city, which still has an impressive theatre, but relatively few other ruins.

Miletus was an important ancient Greek then Roman city, which still boasts an impressive ancient theatre among its ruins. With a history thought to date back as far as the 16th, perhaps even the 17th, century BC, Miletus eventually became a thriving hub from the 8th to 7th centuries BC until... Read More

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Mirobriga

Mirobriga was once a thriving Roman town, the ruins of which can now be seen in Portugal.

Mirobriga was once a thriving Roman town, the ruins of which can now be seen in Portugal. Believed to date back to the first century AD, the remains of Mirobriga are quite extensive, well preserved and include a forum and the country’s only surviving Hippodrome - once the site of fierce... Read More

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Mithraeum House - Merida

Mithraeum House in Merida was a grand Roman home dating back as far as the late first century.

Mithraeum House (Casa del Mitreo) in Merida was an impressive Roman home built sometime in the late first, early second century. Centred on three main courtyards and with some of its intricate decoration still evident, it is clear that Mithraeum House would have been a grand residence. The current name of... Read More

Mons Claudianus

Mons Claudianus is an Ancient Roman quarry in the Egyptian dessert.

Mons Claudianus in Egypt houses an Ancient Roman quarry, the remains of which can still be seen today. Mons Claudianus was one of a few Roman quarries used to mine for granodiorite, a type of quartz only found in Egypt and which was used in many of the empire’s most... Read More

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Multangular Tower

The Multangular Tower is a third century AD ten-sided stone tower originally forming part of York’s Roman legionary fortress and now located in the gardens of the York Museum.

The Multangular Tower is an imposing third century AD ten-sided stone tower originally forming part of York’s Roman legionary fortress and now located in the gardens of the York Museum. The original Roman walls of York probably included eight defensive towers and were built in the late second or early third... Read More

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Musee de Cluny

Musee de Cluny houses Ancient Roman baths and the national medieval museum in Paris.

Musee de Cluny in Paris is steeped in both medieval and Ancient Roman history. Officially known as Musée National du Moyen Âge – the National Museum of the Middle Ages - Musee de Cluny has an impressive collection, including Roman statues, gothic sculptures, a treasury filled with the works of... Read More

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Musee du Louvre

Musee du Louvre is a twelfth century fort turned palace and today stands as one of the world’s foremost art museums.

Musee du Louvre, also known as, the Grand Louvre or just The Louvre, is one of the world’s foremost art museums, exhibiting over 35,000 works from around the globe and throughout history. The Louvre’s eight departments cover an extensive array of historical periods and artistic genres, each represented through the museum’s... Read More

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Musei Capitolini

The Musei Capitolini in Rome host a huge wealth of artifacts and exhibits from the ancient, medieval and renaissance periods.

Musei Capitolini (Capitoline Museums) stand on the ancient Capitoline Hill in the centre of Rome and host a huge wealth of artifacts and exhibits from the ancient, medieval and renaissance periods. Among Musei Capitolini’s many wonders are collections of classical sculptures and statues, exhibits on ancient mythology, medieval and renaissance artworks... Read More

Museo del Sannio di Benevento

Museo del Sannio is an historical museum in Benevento which displays ancient and medieval artefacts from the local area.

Museo del Sannio (The Samnite Museum) in Benevento is an archaeological and historical museum housing a series of finds from this area of Campania. Amongst its collections, Museo del Sannio houses Ancient Greek and Ancient Roman pieces as well as those from the Samnite era and includes its Room of Caudium,... Read More

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Museum of London

The Museum of London explores the history of the UK’s capital city.

The Museum of London explores the history of UK’s capital city through a series of exhibitions. The contents of some galleries at the Museum of London are constantly changing, although there are nine permanent collections. These look at the development of the city since prehistoric times, through to Roman London, the... Read More

Museum of Orange

The Museum of Orange is a museum of mostly Roman, but also prehistoric, artefacts found in the region.

The Museum of Orange (Musee D’Orange) is an archaeological museum across the road from the UNESCO-listed Roman Theatre of Orange. The Museum of Orange displays a series of artefacts found in the area, dating from prehistoric to Roman times. Amongst its most celebrated items, the Museum of Orange houses a series... Read More

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Myra

Myra has one of the best-preserved collections of ancient ruins, and is a perfect place to experience an illustrious period of Greek and Roman history being brought back to life.

The ancient town of Myra in Lycia gives a unique insight into Turkey’s history and the many different civilisations which influenced the area. Today a collection of mostly Roman ruins remain which give visitors the opportunity to envisage the bustling centre that is thought to have been established up to 2,500... Read More

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Naples Cathedral

Naples Cathedral was completed in the fourteenth century and houses the relics of San Gennaro.

Naples Cathedral, translated as Duomo di Napoli, was initially commissioned by King Charles I of Anjou in 1294 and took almost thirty years to complete. Whilst originally a thirteenth to fourteenth century church, earthquakes and other factors have meant that Naples Cathedral has undergone a series of renovations and rebuilding projects.... Read More

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Naples National Archeological Museum

The Naples National Archaeological Museum holds comprehensive collections from the Greek, Roman and Egyptian eras.

The Naples National Archaeological Museum (Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli) holds a comprehensive collection of Ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman artifacts, including most of the pieces found in Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabiae. Some of the most famous exhibits at the Naples National Archaeological Museum include mosaics from the Roman towns and cities... Read More

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Narbonne Archaeological Museum

The Narbonne Archaeological Museum displays Ancient Roman artefacts.

Narbonne Archaeological Museum (Musée Archéologique de Narbonne) in southern France is a museum of this town’s Ancient Roman past, displaying everything from sarcophagi to frescos and furniture. The finds come from the ancient Roman city of Narbo-Martius, the capital of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis. The museum contains a collection of... Read More

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National Museum Cardiff

The National Museum Cardiff has a diverse collection ranging from art to natural history and archaeology.

The National Museum Cardiff has a diverse collection ranging from art to natural history and archaeology. The art collections at the National Museum Cardiff spans over 500 years and a range of countries. Meanwhile, history fans can also head to the Origins gallery, which chronicles the history of man in... Read More

Nea Pafos

Nea Pafos is an archaeological site near Paphos Harbour which served as the capital of Cyprus from the fourth century BC.

Nea Pafos is an archaeological site near Paphos Harbour in Cyprus housing the remains of what was once the capital of the island. Founded in the fourth century BC by Nikokles, the last king of nearby Palaipafos, Nea Pafos then went from strength to strength, particularly under the Ptolemaic kingdom... Read More

Nice-Cimiez Archaeological Museum

The Nice-Cimiez Archaeological Museum houses artefacts from the ancient Roman city of Cemenelum.

The Nice-Cimiez Archaeological Museum houses artefacts from the ancient Roman city of Cemenelum, some ruins of which can be seen in a nearby park.... Read More

Nora Archaeological Site

The Nora Archaeological Site in Sardinia houses ancient Phoenician and Roman ruins.

The Nora Archaeological Site in Sardinia contains mostly Ancient Roman ruins, but was founded in at least the 8th century BC by the Phoenicians. Some Phoenician ruins can be seen, including a temple and some fortifications. Prior to Phoenician settlement, Nora may have even previously been a nuraghi site (the people... Read More

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North Leigh Roman Villa

North Leigh Roman Villa was a first century villa, the remains of which can be seen in Oxfordshire.

North Leigh Roman Villa was built in the first century in what is now modern day Oxfordshire, UK. Archaeologists believe that North Leigh Roman Villa was once a substantial building made up of approximately sixty rooms, however all that remains today are its ruins. The main feature of the site is its... Read More

Novae

Novae was a Roman town and military camp, the ruins of which are now found in Bulgaria.

Novae, also known as Nove, was a Roman town and military camp and the headquarters of the 8th Augustan Legion, the ruins of which are now found in Bulgaria . Established in around 45AD, at its peak, Novae was of vital strategic importance for guarding from eastern attacks and grew... Read More

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek is a world-class museum of art containing a myriad of ancient works in Copenhagen.

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen in Denmark is a museum of art with a world-class collection of over 10,000 works from the ancient world. The Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek was founded in 1888 by the brewer Carl Jacobsen - the man who made Carlsberg beer known worldwide. A new wing... Read More

Nymphaeum of Kos

The Nymphaeum of Kos was actually an Ancient Roman luxury public lavatory.

The Nymphaeum of Kos was an Ancient Roman building and its name is something of a misnomer. Called the Nymphaeum because its opulence initially led archaeologists to think it was a sanctuary dedicated to the Nymphs, it has since been determined that this would have been a very luxurious set of lavatories. Also... Read More

Odeon of Kos

The Odeon of Kos dates back to the second or third century and would have served as a Roman theatre.

The Odeon of Kos dates back to the second or third century and would have served as a Roman theatre. Today, several of its original rows remain and it is certainly possible to imagine how the Odeon of Kos would have looked in its heyday. Beyond the original rows, the... Read More

Odeon of Lyon

The Odeon of Lyon is a well-restored Ancient Roman theatre and part of a UNESCO World Heritage site.

The Odeon of Lyon is the smaller of two Ancient Roman theatres built in what was then the Roman city of Lugdunum. It is unclear as to when exactly the Odeon of Lyon was constructed, some dating it back to the mid-first or second century AD. Nevertheless, the beautifully restored... Read More

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Old Town of Caceres

The Old Town of Caceres embodies centuries of conquest and re-conquest in its winding streets.

The Old Town of Caceres in Spain is an embodiment of centuries of conflict, with its winding streets, palaces and general style telling the stories of those who fought for its conquest. Founded by the Romans under the name Norbensis Caesarina in the 1st century BC, medieval Caceres was the... Read More

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Olympia

Olympia was a city in Ancient Greece from which today’s Olympic Games originate and is now an important archaeological site protected by UNESCO.

Olympia was a vibrant Ancient Greek city. It is believed that the site of Olympia was inhabited from 3000 BC, however it was after the fall of the Mycenaean civilisation that the city began to flourish and, by 900 BC it was already considered an important religious site. The Olympic Games In... Read More

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Olympos

Olympos is truly a stunning destination, a playground for pirates; these ancient ruins tell a story that blurs the line between myth and reality.

Nestled amongst undisturbed white beaches and plush, tropical forest terrain, the trek to discover the ruins of ancient Olympos is an adventure in itself. Vibrant with wildlife and greenery the site, originally attracting exclusively backpackers, is now popular with couples and families alike. Dating back far into antiquity, Olympos had risen... Read More

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Paestum

Paestum is a Greco-Roman site in Italy containing the stunning remains of three ancient Greek temples.

Paestum is a Greco-Roman site located south of Naples which contains the stunning remains of three ancient Greek temples which still stand tall today. Founded as a Greek colony in the 6th century BC, Paestum was originally known as Poseidonia, named for the Greek god Poseidon. The city was captured by... Read More

Palace of Septimius Severus

The Palace of Septimius Severus was magnificent extension of the Domus Augustana on the Palatine.

The Palace of Septimius Severus on the Palatine Hill was an extension of the Domus Augustana and was built during the reign of the Roman Emperor Lucius Septimius Severus (193 - 211 AD). The Palatine Hill was closely linked with the foundation of ancient Rome and housed some of its most... Read More

Palaipafos

Palaipafos in Cyprus contains ruins dating back as far as the Late Bronze Age.

Palaipafos, also known as Palaepaphos, is an archaeological site near Kouklia village, Paphos, in Cyprus linked to the ancient cult of the “Great Goddess” of fertility. The oldest and most revered site at Palaipafos is the Sanctuary of Aphrodite, built by the Mycenaeans in circa 1200BC, around the time at... Read More

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Palatine Hill

The Palatine Hill is known as the birthplace of Rome. It houses some of the city’s most impressive ancient sites.

The Palatine Hill (Palatino) is considered to be the place where Rome was born. One of Rome’s seven hills, the Palatine Hill is closely linked with the city’s history and houses some of its most ancient and important sites. Legend says that the twins Romulus and Remus were taken to... Read More

Palazzo dei Conservatori

Palazzo dei Conservatori displays numerous important classical pieces. Part of the Musei Capitolini.

The Palazzo dei Conservatori is one of the buildings of Rome’s Capitoline Museums or “Musei Capitolini”. Like its counterpart Palazzo Nuovo, Palazzo dei Conservatori displays classical pieces as well as paintings. Highlights of Palazzo dei Conservatori include a first century AD bronze sculpture known as the Spinario, which depicts a boy... Read More

Palazzo Nuovo

The Palazzo Nuovo is an archaeological museum of Ancient Greek and Roman art. Part of the Musei Capitolini.

The Palazzo Nuovo is part of the Capitoline Museums, known in Italian as Musei Capitolini, which is a famous museum complex in Rome housing an incredible array of artwork and artefacts spanning much of Rome’s history. Originally established in 1471, when Pope Sixtus I donated a series of bronze statues to... Read More

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Palmyra

Containing some of the best preserved Roman ruins in the world, Palmyra was an ancient city which became a strategically vital part of the Roman Empire. Its remains are located in Syria.

Along with many other historical sites in the region, the ancient site of Palmyra is reported to have been heavily damaged in the current conflicts. This page remains as it was originally created in 2011 and will stand as a live-archived article until it is again possible to assess the... Read More

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Pantheon

The Pantheon in Rome is one of the most famous and well-preserved ancient buildings in the world.

The Pantheon in Rome is one of the most famous and well-preserved ancient buildings in the world. Originally built by Marcus Agrippa in 25BC, the Pantheon served as a temple to the many gods of Rome. The original Pantheon was destroyed by the great fire of 80AD and the structure which... Read More

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Patara

Patara not only has a rich and varied history, the former Lycian port town is situated in a beautiful corner of Turkey, alongside a 20km long white sand beach.

Located on the Mediterranean coast, and boasting a beautiful white sand beach, the ruins of ancient Patara nestle behind the sand dunes and combine that truly idyllic mix of sun, sea and wonderful history. This ancient city was originally a Lycian settlement and then served as an important naval base during... Read More

Pella

Pella in Greece was the capital of ancient Macedonia and the birthplace of Alexander the Great.

Pella, near a small town in Greece by the same name, is an archaeological site which was once the thriving capital of ancient Macedonia. Established by King Amyntas III at the end of the fifth, beginning of the fourth century BC, Pella took over this role from the former capital,... Read More

Pergamum

Pergamum was a thriving ancient Greek then Roman city, home to famous sites such as its Asclepion, theatre and library.

Pergamum, which is also spelt Pergamon, is a famous archaeological site in Turkey which developed under the Attalid dynasty following the death of Alexander the Great. When Alexander died, one of his generals, Lysimachus, took control of the region. When Lysimachus died in 281BC, Pergamum and the surrounding area fell... Read More

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Perge

Perge is a Turkish archaeological site containing mostly Roman ruins, but has a history dating back to Ancient Greece.

The ancient city of Perge near Antalya in Turkey is now an impressive archaeological site containing a wealth of ancient ruins, mostly dating back to the Roman period, though the city itself has a history dating back well into antiquity. The current city is said to have been founded in circa... Read More

Perperikon

Perperikon was an important Thracian sanctuary turned Roman town then medieval fortress.

Perperikon was an important Thracian holy sanctuary which became a Roman town around the first century BC and was later the site of a medieval fortress. Inhabited since 5000BC, Perperikon became home to the Temple of Dionysus, legendary for being the place of great prophecies. One of the most famous... Read More

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Petra

Petra is a famous UNESCO-listed ancient Nabataean city which later formed part of the Roman Empire.

Petra is an iconic ancient site in southern Jordan. A secret to all but the Bedouins until 1812, Petra’s incredible monuments are now considered to be one of the wonders of the world. Petra was established by the once nomadic Kingdom of the Nabataeans. Carving a city out of the sandstone... Read More

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Pevensey Castle

Pevensey Castle is a picturesque ruin of a medieval castle built in the place where William the Conqueror landed in 1066.

Pevensey Castle is a Norman castle built upon the fourth century AD Roman fort of Anderida, the substantial remains of which are still visible today. Indeed, the main outer defensive walls of the larger Roman fortification have survived very much intact, forming a wider outer ring within which the main... Read More

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Pharsalus Battlefield

Pharsalus Battlefield was the setting for the most decisive battle of Caesar’s civil war and saw the final defeat of Pompey the Great.

Pharsalus Battlefield was the setting for one of the most decisive and important battles of ancient Rome – the defeat of Pompey the Great by Julius Caesar. It was a battle which Caesar won against the odds and it all but confirmed his position as ruler of Rome, a key... Read More

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Phaselis

Phaselis is an exquisite ancient site, where the ruins lie scattered amongst pine trees and the beautiful Mediterranean coast.

The ruins of Phaselis lie to the west of Antalya on Turkey’s Mediterranean coast, boasting a beautiful contrast of a mountain backdrop and an attractive white sand beach. The site is distinguishable by three natural harbours, and is located in the Olympos National Park. Phaselis is said to have been founded... Read More

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Philippi Battlefield

Philippi Battlefield is the location of the Battle of Philippi, where Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the forces of those who had assassinated Julius Caesar.

Philippi Battlefield in modern Greece is the location of one of the most important engagements in Roman history, where Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the forces of those who had assassinated Julius Caesar – notably Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. After Caesar’s assassination in 44 BC a short, uneasy... Read More

Philippopolis

Philippopolis, in the modern city of Plovdiv, was an ancient city ruled by various civilisations. Highlights include the Ancient Forum, Theatre and Roman Stadium.

Philippopolis, in the modern city of Plovdiv, Bulgaria, was an ancient city ruled by Thracians, Macedonians and Romans, all of whom have left their mark on this historic city. Originally the Thracian city of Eumolpins, Philip of Macedon pushed out the Thracians and founded his namesake city in 342 BC. The city... Read More

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Philopappos Monument

A magnificent mausoleum celebrating the life of one of Athens’ most important benefactors, Julius Antiochus Philopappos, and built by the citizens of the city after his death in 116 AD.

The Philopappos Monument is a magnificent mausoleum celebrating the life of one of Athens’ most important benefactors, Gaius Julius Antiochus Epiphanes Philopappos, and built by the citizens of the city after his death in 116 AD. When Philopappos died, the citizens of Athens built a spectacular two-storey Pentelic marble mausoleum... Read More

Plovdiv Amphitheatre

Plovdiv Amphitheatre is a beautifully preserved Roman site which dates back to the 2nd century AD.

Plovdiv Amphitheatre is a beautifully preserved Roman site which dates back to the 2nd century AD, during the reign of the Emperor Trajan. Although known as Plovidiv Amphitheatre, it is in fact an ancient theatre, not an amphitheatre. It would remain in use for several hundred years, right up until the... Read More

Plovdiv Ancient Forum

Plovdiv Ancient Forum contains mostly Roman ruins including an odeon.

Plovdiv Ancient Forum contains the mostly Roman ruins of Plovdiv. Once known as Philipopolis, its Greek name, Plovdiv has a range of ancient sites. Much of the structure of Plovdiv Ancient Forum dates to the 1st century AD. It spans an area of 11 hectares and contained the... Read More

Plovdiv Roman Stadium

Plovdiv Roman Stadium was built in the 2nd century AD, although little remains of it today.

Plovdiv Roman Stadium was an ancient sports arena built in the 2nd century AD. At its peak, Plovdiv Roman Stadium had a capacity of some 30,000 spectators and, though little remains today, there is an ongoing renovation project in place. The main surviving remnants are an area of seating and track... Read More

Pollentia

Pollentia is an Ancient Roman site in Alcudia in Majorca.

Pollentia is an archaeological site in Alcudia, Majorca housing the remains of an Ancient Roman city. It is thought that the Romans established Pollentia in either the first or second century BC and that the city was thriving by the second century AD. Sadly, Pollentia has been the subject of significant... Read More

Pompey’s Pillar

Pompey’s Pillar is a third century Ancient Roman column in Alexandria in Egypt.

Pompey’s Pillar is a solitary granite column in Alexandria, Egypt and one of the few Roman remains to have survived in the city. Whilst called “Pompey’s Pillar”, this 25 metre tall structure was actually dedicated to the Emperor Diocletian, who ruled Rome from from 284 to 305 AD. Completed towards... Read More

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Pont du Gard

Pont du Gard is a famous Ancient Roman bridge and aqueduct once used to supply Nimes with water.

Pont du Gard is an iconic Ancient Roman bridge and aqueduct built in first century AD and located near Nimes in France. In fact, it was the tallest bridge ever built by the Romans, rising 160 feet. Nimes had been a major city of Gaul before 45BC, when it was incorporated... Read More

Ponte Rotto

Ponte Rotto is the remaining arch of a second century BC Roman Republic bridge.

Ponte Rotto, originally known as Pons Aemilius is Rome’s oldest, albeit defunct, stone bridge. Built in the second century BC to replace its wooden predecessor, Ponte Rotto, meaning the “broken bridge” is indeed missing most of its original structure. Today, only an arch remains of Ponte Rotto, worth seeing if you are... Read More

Porta Nigra

Porta Nigra is a late second century Roman gate in Trier in Germany.

Porta Nigra, translated as the “Black Gate” is a magnificently well-preserved second century Roman gate in Trier, Germany. Originally constructed of large blocks of light sandstone, the darkening of its appearance by the Middle Ages led to it being called Porta Nigra, with its original name unknown. By the mid-second century... Read More

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Portchester Castle

Portchester Castle has been a Roman fort, a Norman keep and even a wartime prison.

Portchester Castle in Hampshire offers a fantastic insight into various periods of British history and originally dates back to the Roman era. Built during Roman times, probably in the third century AD, Portchester Castle is the country’s only example of a Roman fort whose walls still stand complete up to... Read More

Porte de Mars

Porte de Mars is an ornate third century Roman arch in Reims.

Porte de Mars is a well preserved third century AD ancient Roman triumphal arch in Reims. Comprised of three wide arches and still adorned with many friezes portraying ancient legends, including that of Romulus and Remus, Porte de Mars was dedicated to the Roman god of war. At the time of its... Read More

Priene

Priene is a quiet, picturesque ancient Greek city in Turkey which boasts some amazing historical remains without the crowds of the nearby sites.

Priene is an ancient Greek city which lies between the popular holiday resorts of Kusadasi and Bodrum. It is one of many important ancient sites in the area and is close to both Miletus and Ephesus. However, though smaller than other nearby historical attractions, the real charm of Priene lies in... Read More

Puente de Alcantara

Puente de Alcantara is a Roman bridge crossing the Tagus River in Spain.

Puente de Alcantara (Alcantara Bridge) in Spain is an impressive stone arch structure crossing the Tajo River and acting as the entrance to Alcantara. Puente de Alcantara was originally built by the Romans, but much of it has since been the subject of reconstruction, mostly due to damage caused during... Read More

Pula Arena

Pula Arena is a dramatic first century AD Roman amphitheatre in Croatia.

Pula Arena, also known as Pula Amphitheatre, is a dramatic historic Roman amphitheatre in Croatia. Built in the first century AD, Pula Arena was constructed during the reign of the Emperor Vespasian, who was also responsible for founding the Colosseum. Able to accommodate approximately 20,000 spectators, Pula Arena would have played... Read More

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Pyramid of Cestius

The Pyramid of Cestius is a tomb dating back to Ancient Rome.

The Pyramid of Cestius is the tomb of affluent magistrate, Caius Cestius which was built between 18 and 12 BC. Constructed of white marble and brick, this ostentatious 35-metre high tomb was likely built in this style due to the popularity of all things Egyptian which swept Rome after Egypt was... Read More

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Qasr Bashir

Qasr Bashir (Q’Sar Bashir) is an exceptionally well preserved fourth Century Roman fortress that lies in the Jordanian desert.

Qasr Bashir (aka Q’Sar Bashir or Qasr Al Bashir), is an extremely well preserved Roman fortress that lies in the Jordanian desert. Unlike many Roman remains, Qasr Bashir is exceptionally well preserved, having never been re-built by later civilisations. Built at the beginning of the fourth Century AD and known... Read More

Rheinisches Landesmuseum

The Rheinisches Landesmuseum chronicles the history of Trier and the region as far back as the Stone Age.

The Rheinisches Landesmuseum (Rhenish State Museum) of Trier is a large archaeological museum which exhibits pieces from throughout the history of the city and its region. Starting with the Stone Age and up to the medieval era, the Rheinisches Landesmuseum offers an overview of the development of Trier and its surrounding... Read More

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Richborough Roman Fort

Richborough Roman Fort in Kent marks the site where the Romans successfully invaded Britain in 43 AD.

Richborough Roman Fort, originally called “Rutupiae”, in Kent marks the site where the Romans successfully invaded Britain in 43 AD. Known by many as the “gateway to Britain” and also Richborough Castle, Richborough Roman Fort is thought to have begun as a military stronghold for the invading Roman soldiers and developed... Read More

Rimini City Museum

The Rimini City Museum is this city’s most extensive history museum.

The Rimini City Museum is an historical and archaeological museum with a series of collections from throughout the city and the region. Located in a former eighteenth century Jesuit monastery and then hospital, the Rimini City Museum traces the history of the city back to Ancient Roman times, with exhibitions ranging... Read More

Rimini Roman Amphitheatre

The Rimini Roman Amphitheatre dates back to the second century.

The Rimini Roman Amphitheatre is a second century Ancient Roman arena which would have held up to twelve thousand spectators. It is the sole surviving amphitheatre of its kind in the region of Emilia Romagna. Having suffered a series of destructive events, including World War II bombardment, little remains of the... Read More

Rio Verde Roman Villa

The Rio Verde Roman Villa was a first to second century Roman home in Marbella.

The Rio Verde Roman Villa (Villa Romana de Rio Verde) was a first to second century AD Roman home and villa complex in Marbella, Spain. Today, the highlight of a visit to the Rio Verde Roman Villa are the impressive Roman mosaics, which depict mostly culinary and religious imagery. These mosaics... Read More

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Roman Agora of Athens

The Roman Agora of Athens contains some of the city’s Ancient Roman ruins.

The Roman Agora of Athens - also known as the Roman Forum of Athens - was founded in the late first century BC / early first century AD and its construction was funded by Julius Caesar and the Emperor Augustus. Probably the most impressive historic site at the Roman Agora of... Read More

Roman Amphitheatre - Alexandria

The Ancient Roman amphitheatre in Alexandria is the only one of its kind found in Egypt and is one of the many roman ruins in the region.

The Roman amphitheatre in Alexandria in Egypt is a large circular Roman theatre and the only one of its type to be found in the country. Though often referred to as an amphitheatre, the site is actually that of a small Roman theatre rather than a larger sporting arena. Excavations at... Read More

Roman Amphitheatre - Saintes

The Roman Amphitheatre in Saintes was built in around 40AD in the Roman settlement of Mediolanum Santonum.

The Roman Amphitheatre in Saintes is a 1st century AD construction built around 40AD during the reign of Emperor Claudius. Saintes was then known as Mediolanum Santonum and was a thriving Roman settlement in modern day France which was founded around 20BC. The amphitheatre itself would have had space for several... Read More

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Roman Amphitheatre of Carthage

Once holding over 30,000 spectators, the Roman Amphitheatre of Carthage was one of the biggest ancient stadia in North Africa. Today much of the site lies in ruins but it is still worth a visit.

The Roman Amphitheatre of Carthage was once a major Roman stadium, the ruins of which can be found near modern-day Tunis. Probably built at the end of the first century AD, it is believed to have been able to hold up to 35,000 spectators. Unlike other Roman Amphitheatres in... Read More

Roman Bath House Museum

In 1930 in the basement of the Mail Coach Inn in St. Sampson’s Square in York, renovators stumbled across the 1,900 year old remains of a Roman ‘caldarium’, or steam bath.

In 1930 when the Mail Coach Inn in St. Sampson’s Square in York was undergoing renovations, builders uncovered the 1,900 year-old remains of a Roman ‘caldarium’, or steam bath. The bath house was used by the soldiers of the Legio XI Hispana (Spanish Ninth Legion) who were stationed in Eboracum... Read More

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Roman Baths - Bath

One of the best known Roman sites in the UK, the Roman Baths in Bath is an Ancient Roman thermal spa and one of the best preserved examples of its kind.

The world famous Roman Baths complex in Bath, UK, contains an incredible set of thermal spas and an impressive ancient Roman bathing house. First discovered in the nineteenth century, the Roman Baths are one of the best preserved ancient Roman sites in the UK and form a major tourist attraction. Among the... Read More

Roman Necropolis of Barcelona

The Roman Necropolis of Barcelona contains 95 Ancient Roman tombs.

The Roman Necropolis of Barcelona (Necrópolis Romana) is a realtively obscure site which contains 95 second and third century Roman tombs. As with most Roman cities, Barcino (Barcelona) required all burials to take place outside of its city walls. Today, the Roman Necropolis can be seen in a small park within... Read More

Roman Pyramid of Vienne

The Roman Pyramid of Vienne is a monument which would once have formed the centrepiece of Vienne’s Roman Circus.

The Roman Pyramid of Vienne (La Pyramide de Vienne) is a monument which would once have formed the centrepiece of Vienne’s Roman Circus. While described as a pyramid, this is infact more of a triumphal monument made up of an arched base topped with a steep-sided square-based pyramid tower. Modelled after... Read More

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Roman Ribchester

The remains of Ribchester Roman Fort and the Ribchester Roman Bathhouse can be seen alongside the Ribchester Roman Museum.

The modern day village of Ribchester is situated on the site of what was once a large Roman fort and settlement known as Bremetennacum Veteranorum. Today, the remains of Ribchester Roman Fort and the Ribchester Roman Bathhouse can be seen alongside the Ribchester Roman Museum, which showcases the best of... Read More

Roman Ruins of Milreu

The Roman Ruins of Milreu are an important Portuguese archaeological site in the Algarve.

The Roman Ruins of Milreu (Ruinas Romanas de Milreu) are an important Portuguese archaeological site in the Algarve housing remains dating from the first to the sixth centuries AD. A luxurious manor house turned thriving farm in the third century, the Roman Ruins of Milreu are quite extensive and include... Read More

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Roman Ruins of Troia

The Roman Ruins of Tróia were the largest salted fish and fish sauces production complex built in the first half of the 1st c. AD. It developed into an urban settlement probably occupied until the 6th c. The different areas opened to the public are two large fish-salting workshops, the baths, the mausoleum, its cemetery and the residential quarter of rua da Princesa. The visiting circuit, installed in 2010, has interpretation panels in seven observation points and signs indicating the possible ways. The early Christian basilica can only be visited in guided tours.

The ruins of the Roman settlement of Troia in Portugal contain the remains of an important trading centre that grew into a small residential settlement. Probably built in the first half of the 1st century AD, Troia was known for its production and trade in the popular Roman fish-based sauce Garum... Read More

Roman Temple of Evora

The Roman Temple of Evora was an impressive Roman monument and is now a pretty ruin.

The Roman Temple of Evora was an impressive Roman monument which dates back to the second - maybe even the first - century AD and is now a pretty ruin. Often known as the Temple of Diana (Templo de Diana), The Roman Temple of Evora has been attributed to this... Read More

Roman Theatre of Benevento

The Roman Theatre of Benevento is a well-preserved semi-circular Roman theatre that was built under the Emperor Hadrian.

The Roman Theatre of Benevento, known locally as Teatro Romano di Benevento, is a well-preserved semi-circular ancient theatre built during the reign of the Roman Emperor, Hadrian. Measuring 295 feet in diameter and constructed of rock, brick and cement, the Roman Theatre of Benevento was completed in approximately 126AD and would... Read More

Roman Theatre of Orange

One of the best Roman ruins in France, the Roman Theatre of Orange is a stunningly well-preserved first century theatre in France and is UNESCO listed.

The Roman Theatre of Orange, known locally as the Theatre Antique, is a stunningly well-preserved first century theatre and one of the best preserved Roman sites in the world. Dating back to the rule of Augustus (31 BC to 14 AD), the Roman Theatre of Orange is an incredible site... Read More

Romano-Germanic Museum - Cologne

The Romano-Germanic Museum is a museum of Ancient Roman history in Cologne.

The Romano-Germanic Museum (Römisch-Germanisches Museum) in Cologne houses an extensive collection of ancient Roman finds from around Germany, particularly from the local area which was occupied by the Romans for a considerable time. During the Roman era, Cologne was known as “Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium” and was the capital of the... Read More

Romerbrucke

Romerbrucke is a second century UNESCO-listed Roman bridge in Trier which is still in use.

Romerbrucke is an ancient Roman bridge which crosses the Mosel River in Trier in Germany. Built between 144 and 152 AD, much of the original structure of Romerbrucke still survives, although some of it – notably the road and its arches – date back to the eighteenth century. Still an active... Read More

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Sabratha

A picturesque ancient city on Libya’s coast, Sabratha contains some excellent Roman ruins.

Once a thriving Roman city, the impressive ruins of Sabratha lie approximately fifty miles west of Triopli, alongside the modern town of the same name. Remarkably picturesque, the ruins of Sabratha look out across the Mediterranean and give modern visitors an insight into why this location served the ancient trading routes... Read More

Sagalassos

Sagalassos is an active archaeological site in southwest Turkey which contains mostly Hellenistic and Ancient Roman ruins, some of them very well preserved. It is one of many Roman sites in the area.

Sagalassos is an active archaeological site in southwest Turkey which contains mostly Hellenistic and Ancient Roman historic ruins, some of them very well preserved. In particular, the Fountain of Antoninler at Sagalassos still has its pretty facade. There are also the remains of a 9,000 seat theatre, a council hall... Read More

Sagunto Castle

Sagunto Castle was a large Moorish citadel, the impressive remains of which overlook the modern town.

Sagunto Castle (Castillo de Sagunto) is a vast ruin spread over a kilometre and overlooking the town. The most impressive parts of Sagunto Castle date back to around the eighth century and were built by the Moors as an imposing fortress. However, the site also shows signs of previous inhabitants... Read More

Sagunto Roman Theatre

The Sagunto Roman Theatre dates back to the first century, when it was built into the side of a mountain.

The Sagunto Roman Theatre (Teatro Romano de Sagunto) dates back to the first century, when it was built into the side of a mountain. The site has the honour of being the first ever to be declared a Spanish National Monument, an accolade it achieved in 1896. However, while the... Read More

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Salamanca Roman Bridge

The Salamanca Roman Bridge is said to date back to the first century AD.

The Salamanca Roman Bridge (Puente Romano de Salamanca) is a picturesque stone arched bridge said to date back to the first century AD. This would place it in the reign of Marcus Ulpius Traianus, when the bridge was part of the 'Plata' or ‘silver’ route between Merida and Astorga. Much of... Read More

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Salona

Salona is an impressive Roman site which bears the remains of this once great ancient capital and believed birthplace of Diocletian.

Salona, or Solin, was an administrative hub of Ancient Rome, the capital of Dalmatia and is believed to have been the birthplace of the Emperor Diocletian, under whom it flourished. An important city, Salona is well preserved and well signed. Access is along the top of the defensive wall giving... Read More

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San Clemente

Among the most interesting Roman sites, San Clemente is a church built atop a series of fourth and third century BC ruins.

San Clemente is a beautifully frescoed twelfth century historic basilica in Rome. However, whilst interesting in its own right, it is what lies underneath San Clemente which is a highlight to historians. In the mid-nineteenth century, when San Clemente was excavated, it was discovered to have been built over both a... Read More

San Giovanni in Laterano

San Giovanni in Laterano is Rome’s cathedral, originally founded by Constantine the Great.

San Giovanni in Laterano, or Rome Cathedral, is a basilica known to many as the “cathedral of the world”, by virtue of the fact that it is the cathedral of Rome and thus the seat of the Pope. Founded by the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great in the early fourth century... Read More

San Lorenzo Maggiore

The San Lorenzo Maggiore ruins in Naples are the underground remains of a Greek colony then Roman city.

What seems to be the attractive thirteenth century church of San Lorenzo Maggiore in Naples in fact contains a startling secret – the amazing underground remains of the Greco-Roman city of Neapolis. For lovers of ancient Rome it's simply unmissable. Established in approximately 470 BC by the Cumans, Neapolis would later... Read More

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San Pietro in Vincoli

San Pietro in Vincoli (Saint Peter in Chains) is a Roman Catholic titular church and minor basilica in Rome, Italy, best known for being the home of Michelangelo's statue of Moses, part of the tomb of Pope Julius II.

The beautiful San Pietro in Vincoli in Rome is a quiet, inconspicuous ancient church containing several stunning sculptures by the famous artist Michelangelo as well as famed religious artefacts said to date back to St Peter. Originally built in the 5th century AD by Empress Eudoxia - wife of Roman Emperor... Read More

San Saturnino Basilica

San Saturnino Basilica is one of Sardinia’s oldest churches.

San Saturnino Basilica (Basilica di San Saturnino) is one of Sardinia’s oldest churches. San Saturnino Basilica was definitely in existence by the sixth century AD and perhaps even as early as the fourth. In fact, the namesake of San Saturnino Basilica is said to have been executed here during the reign... Read More

Santa Eulalia Basilica - Merida

Santa Eulalia Basilica was an Ancient Roman church, the remains of which are located in Merida.

Santa Eulalia Basilica in Merida, known locally as Basílica de Santa Eulalia, is an Ancient Roman church the remains of which lie under the present eighteenth century church. The namesake of Santa Eulalia Basilica was a girl who was martyred upon being burnt at the stake during the Christian persecutions under... Read More

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Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri

An impressive 16th century church in Rome, built by Michelangelo using the structural remains of the ancient Baths of Diocletian.

The Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri (St. Mary of the Angels and the Martyrs) is a large and impressive 16th century church constructed within the remains of the Baths of Diocletian and masterminded by renowned renaissance artist Michelangelo. Though centuries had passed since the fall of the... Read More

Santa Maria in Trastevere

Santa Maria in Trastevere is thought to have been the first Christian church in Rome.

Santa Maria in Trastevere is thought to have been one of the first – if not actually the first – of the Christian churches in Rome. Whilst most of the building and works contained in Santa Maria in Trastevere date back to the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the church itself may... Read More

Sao Cucufate Roman Villa

Sao Cucufate Roman Villa is a two-storey Roman ruin in Portugal dating mostly to the fourth century AD.

Sao Cucufate Roman Villa, also known as Villa Aulica, in Portugal dates back as far as the first century AD, although most of what can be seen there today dates to the fourth century. At this time, the Sao Cucufate Roman Villa may have operated as a farmhouse. The name "Sao... Read More

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Sbeitla

Sbeitla in Tunisia flourished as a Roman city from the 1st century AD.

Sbeitla in Tunisia was once a flourishing ancient city, the spectacular remains of which are among the best Roman ruins in the world. This startling site, also at times known as Sufetula, thrived as a Roman settlement from the 1st century AD before becoming a Christian centre, a Byzantine city and... Read More

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Segedunum Roman Fort

Segedunum Roman Fort was one of the Ancient Roman wall forts of Hadrian’s Wall.

Segedunum Roman Fort was one of the ancient Roman wall forts of Hadrian’s Wall, the iconic UNESCO-listed barrier built under the Emperor Hadrian from 122 AD. There were several wall forts along the 73-mile stretch of Hadrian’s Wall, each garrisoned by Roman soldiers. From around 122 AD, Segedunum Roman Fort held... Read More

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Segovia Aqueduct

The Segovia Aqueduct is one of the best preserved Roman structures in Spain. UNESCO listed.

Segovia Aqueduct is one of the best preserved Roman structures in the world and represents a brilliant feat of engineering. Built at around the end of the first / beginning of the second century AD, the Segovia Aqueduct still stands tall and includes two levels of granite arches to a total... Read More

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Side Ruins and Museum

Impressive ruins and a fascinating museum, Side hosts a wealth of Graeco-Roman remains and the impressive amphitheatre is a particular highlight.

The ruins of ancient Side are among of the most spectacular that remain in the modern world and showcase hundreds of years of Greek life in the Roman Empire. Its coastal location made Side a desirable trading port and, despite the prominence of piracy, Greek settlers flocked to the city around... Read More

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Silchester Roman Town

Silchester Roman Town flourished from the mid-first century AD and was eventually abandoned.

Silchester Roman Town is home to the remains of Calleva Atrebatum, a town which flourished under the Romans in the mid-first century AD. Built on the site of what had been an Iron Age trading hub, Calleva Atrebatum itself became a busy town crammed with shops, homes and several public... Read More

Silves Archaeological Museum

Silves Archaeological Museum offers an insight into the history of Silves and its surrounding area.

Silves Archaeological Museum (Museu Municipal de Arqueologia de Silves) offers an insight into the history of Silves and its surrounding area, with a collection spanning from prehistory to the seventeenth century. This collection is divided into four main sections, namely the prehistoric, Roman, Moorish and the Portuguese periods. The... Read More

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Simena

The ruins of Simena are spread along beautiful beaches and submerged under crystal clear waters. Enjoy spectacular views from the crusader castle or explore an authentic Lycian Necropolis.

The remains of ancient Simena, now modern Kaleköy in the Kekova region, form one of the most impressive historical places in Turkey. The city’s striking crusader castle combines with a wealth of partly submerged ancient ruins and the beautiful Mediterranean waters to produce a truly inspiring place to explore. Indeed, it... Read More

Sirmium Imperial Palace

The Sirmium Imperial Palace complex holds the remains of a Roman imperial palace which was home to several Roman Emperors in the middle and late empire.

The Sirmium Imperial Palace complex in Serbia contains the remains of a Roman imperial palace which was home to several Roman Emperors, including Constantine I. Built at the end of the third or beginning of the fourth century AD, the complex has now been opened to the public as a museum.... Read More

Spanish National Museum of Archaeology

The Spanish National Museum of Archaeology displays historical artefacts from throughout the country’s history as well as from around the world.

The Spanish National Museum of Archaeology (Museo Nacional de Arqueologia) in Madrid displays historical artefacts from throughout the country’s history as well as from around the world. The periods covered by the Spanish National Archaeological Museum range from prehistory to the nineteenth century and include Ancient Roman and Greek works, Egyptian... Read More

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Sparta

The ancient Greek city of Sparta was one of the most famous city-states of the ancient world and became a popular Roman city.

Sparta was one of the most famous city-states of the ancient world and left not only a mark in our historic records, but its very culture at the heart of modern language – the English word 'Spartan' reflecting their very way of life – simple, basic, severe. Rising to power in... Read More

Photo by Stuart (cc)

St Bride’s Church

Located in London’s journalistic heartland of Fleet Street, St Bride’s is a restored 17th century church, steeped in history and originally designed by Sir Christopher Wren.

Located in London’s journalistic heartland of Fleet Street, St Bride’s is a restored 17th century church, steeped in history and originally designed by Sir Christopher Wren. A succession of churches has existed on the site for over 1,000 years and the site’s history stretches even further into the past right back... Read More

St Matthias Abbey - Trier

St Matthias Abbey houses the grave of its namesake, the apostle, St Mathias.

St Matthias Abbey (Benediktiner abtei St. Matthias) is a twelfth century church and the site of the tomb of the apostle St Matthias, who succeeded Judas. Also located at St Matthias Abbey, which was consecrated in 1148, is a Roman cemetery housing the final resting places of the first bishops of... Read More

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St Peter’s Basilica

St Peter’s Basilica is one of the holiest of Christian sites with a history dating back to Ancient Rome.

St Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City is one of the most important Christian sites in the world and is a church (rather than a cathedral) with a long and illustrious history. Also known as the 'Papal Basilica of Saint Peter' and in Italian as 'Basilica Papale di San Pietro in... Read More

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St Sebastian Catacombs

The St. Sebastian Catacombs are some of the earliest of the Christian catacombs in Rome.

The St Sebastian Catacombs (Catacombe di San Sebastiano) are fourth century AD underground Christian burial tombs. They are some of the earliest of their kind in Rome. The many catacombs of Rome are the remnants of early Christianity, a reminder of a time when persecuted Christians would bury their dead in... Read More

Stabiae

Stabiae contains the ruins of both ancient Roman and Oscan civilizations, dating back as far as the 7th century BC.

Stabiae, today contained in the modern town of Castellammare di Stabia, was an Ancient Roman town which, along with Pompeii and Herculaneum, was engulfed in lava and ash when Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD. In fact, it was during this natural disaster that Pliny the Elder was killed in... Read More

Stari Grad Plain

The Stari Grad Plain is a prime example of ancient Greek agricultural practices and organisation.

The Stari Grad Plain is a prime example of ancient Greek agricultural practices and organisation dating back to the Greek colony of Pharos. Inhabited by Ionian Greeks in the 4th century BC, the Stari Grad Plain became an important farming landscape, where mainly grapes and olives were grown. Remarkably, the... Read More

Stobi

Stobi in Macedonia was an ancient settlement of Paeonia before becoming a Roman city.

Stobi is one of Macedonia’s most famous archaeological sites. Once the capital of the kingdom of Paeonia, Stobi was located along a busy trade route and thrived as a commercial hub specialising in the trade of salt. Stobi reached its peak in the third or fourth century AD. Whilst the first... Read More

Syracuse Archaeological Site

The Syracuse Archaeological Site contains the impressive remains of an ancient city dating as far back as the eighth century BC.

The Syracuse Archaeological Site (Siracusa) in Sicily contains the impressive remains of the ancient city of Syracuse dating as far back as the eighth century BC. The city of Syracuse was founded by Greek colonists - heralding from Corinth - in 734 BC. At its height, Syracuse was the most... Read More

Taormina Amphitheatre

Taormina Amphitheatre was first built by the Ancient Greeks in the third century BC and reconstructed by the Romans.

Taormina Amphitheatre (Teatro Greco Romano) was initially built by the Greeks in the third century BC before being rebuilt and enlarged by the Romans. While known as an amphitheatre, the site is actually an ancient theatre, not an arena of the type normally meant by the term. Parts of the Taormina Amphitheatre,... Read More

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Tarragona Amphitheatre

Tarragona Amphitheatre is a second century AD construction would once have played host to gladiatorial battles.

Tarragona Amphitheatre (Anfiteatro Romano de Tarragona) is a second century AD sports arena in Spain which would once have played host to the pastimes of the Ancient Romans, particularly to gladiatorial battles. It was probably built during the reign of Trajan or Hadrian. At the time, Tarragona Amphitheatre was part... Read More

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Tarragona Aqueduct

The stunning Tarragona Aqueduct is the last remaining section of the ancient aqueduct which served the Roman city of Tarraco.

The stunning Tarragona Aqueduct is the last remaining section of the ancient aqueduct which served the Roman city of Tarraco. Also known as Pont de les Ferreres or Pont del Diable, it is believed to have been built in the first century AD during the reign of the Emperor Augustus. The... Read More

Tarragona Roman Circus

Tarragona Roman Circus was built in the first century AD and is one of the best preserved Roman sites in this Spanish city.

Tarragona Roman Circus (Circo Romano de Tarragona) is an ancient racing arena, probably built under the Emperor Domitian in the first century AD, which still contains some astonishing subterranean Roman tunnels. When Tarragona Roman Circus was constructed it would have been able to accommodate up to 30,000 spectators and was just... Read More

Tarragona Roman Forum

The Tarragona Roman Forum houses the ruins of what was the central square of the Ancient Roman city of Tarraco.

The Tarragona Roman Forum houses the ruins of what was the central square of the Ancient Roman city of Tarraco. The site is UNESCO listed. A major Roman city, Terraco was the capital of the province of Nearer Spain. Operating at the very heart of this ancient city, the Forum was... Read More

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Temple de Mercure

The ruins of a temple built atop a mountain called Puy de Dome outside the Gallic city of Augustonemetum (now Clermont-Ferrand).

The ruins of a temple built atop a mountain called Puy de Dome outside the Gallic city of Augustonemetum (now Clermont-Ferrand). This article is a stub and is in line for expansion by our editorial team. You can help expand this information by adding comments below.... Read More

Temple of Antoninus and Faustina

The Temple of Antoninus and Faustina is one of the best preserved of the structures in the Roman Forum and one of the most interesting Roman ruins in the area.

Initially constructed in 141 AD, the Temple of Antoninus and Faustina was built by Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius in honour of his wife, Faustina. It is one of the best preserved structures in the Roman Forum. Faustina was deified following her death and the temple – then just the Temple... Read More

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Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae

The Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae is often said to be one of the best examples of its kind in the Peloponnese.

The Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae, also known simply at the Temple of Bassae, is not just beautifully preserved, but is often said to be one of the best examples of its kind in the Peloponnese. Built sometimes from the middle to end of the 5th Century (estimates range... Read More

Temple of Augustus - Barcelona

The Temple of Augustus is a first century Ancient Roman ruin hidden in Barcelona’s back streets.

The Temple of Augustus is a poorly preserved first century AD Roman ruin hidden in Barcelona’s back streets. Built in honour of the Emperor Augustus in the first century AD, all that remains of this temple are four main columns, hidden away within the medieval quarter in the courtyard of the... Read More

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Temple of Augustus and Livia

The Temple of Augustus and Livia is a very well preserved Roman temple in Vienne.

The Temple of Augustus and Livia (Temple d'Auguste et de Livie) is a very well preserved Roman temple in Vienne. Whilst probably first built sometime between 20BC and 10BC, several aspects of the Temple of Augustus and Livia date to the first century AD. Yet, the main reason for... Read More

Temple of Caesar

The Temple of Caesar was built in honour of Julius Caesar. Its altar remains in the Roman Forum.

The Temple of Caesar (Tempio del Divo Giuli), the remains of which can be seen in the Roman Forum, was dedicated to the Roman Dictator Julius Caesar (100BC - 44BC). Caesar, who was murdered by the senators Cassius, Brutus and their supporters on 15 March 44BC, was cremated. Following his death,... Read More

Temple of Castor and Pollux

The Temple of Castor and Pollux in the Roman Forum was built following a military victory.

The Temple of Castor and Pollux (Templum Castoris) was an ancient Roman temple in Rome’s Forum. First constructed in the fifth century BC, the Temple of Castor and Pollux was then rebuilt in the early first century AD. The Temple of Castor and Pollux was dedicated to Helen of Troy’s twin... Read More

Temple of Concord

The Temple of Concord was an Ancient Roman temple in Rome’s Forum.

The Temple of Concord (Tempio della Concordia) was an ancient Roman temple dedicated to Concordia, the godess of harmony. It is unclear when the Temple of Concord was first constructed. Roman statesman Marcus Furius Camillus vowed to build it in 367 BC, although there is little evidence as to whether he... Read More

Temple of Diana - Merida

One of many Roman sites in the city, the Temple of Diana is a very well-preserved UNESCO-listed Ancient Roman temple in Merida.

The Temple of Diana (Templo de Diana) in Merida was a sacred site constructed by the Romans in the early first century AD, after the conquest of the area by the Emperor Augustus. Roman Merida, known as Emerita Augusta, became an important centre of Roman power in the region. Originally formed... Read More

Temple of Diana - Nimes

The Temple of Diana is a Roman site in Nimes whose ultimate purpose remains a mystery.

The Temple of Diana (Temple de Diane) is a Roman site in Nimes whose ultimate purpose remains a mystery, as does the origin of its name. Believed by some to have been originally built sometime during the reign of Augustus - others say in the 2nd century - it has... Read More

Temple of Olympian Zeus

The Temple of Olympian Zeus is one of the most impressive ancient temples in Greece.

The Temple of Olympian Zeus, also known as the Olympeion is one of the biggest - if not actually the biggest - ancient temples in Greece. Vast and impressive, the Temple of Olympian Zeus was begun by Peisistratus the Young in the sixth century BC but various events and circumstances meant... Read More

Temple of Saturn

The Temple of Saturn was the site of the national treasury of Ancient Rome, the ruins of which stand in the Roman Forum.

The Temple of Saturn in the Roman Forum was a sacred ancient Roman temple dedicated to Saturn, the god of seed-sowing. One of the oldest of the Roman Forum structures, the Temple of Saturn was originally built sometime between 501 BC and 497 BC and reconstructed in the fourth century BC.... Read More

Temple of Taffeh

Temple of Taffeh, built by Roman Emperor Augustus in Egypt.

The Temple of Taffeh, was ordered to be built by Roman Emperor Augustus in Egypt, after his defeat of Cleopatra and Marc Antony. It was built between AD 1 and AD 14. The temple survived in good condition in Egypt for several centuries. However, due to the construction of the... Read More

Temple of Venus and Rome

The Temple of Venus and Rome was created under Hadrian and is located in the Roman Forum.

The Temple of Venus and Rome, known in Latin as Templum Veneris et Romae, in the Roman Forum was built in approximately 135 AD during the reign of the Roman Emperor Hadrian. Hadrian himself is thought to have heavily influenced the design of this temple, although it was later renovated... Read More

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Temples of the Forum Boarium

The Temples of the Forum Boarium are two second century BC Roman republic temples.

The Temples of the Forum Boarium are two of the best preserved Roman temples to have survived from the Republican era. Comprised of two temples, the Temple of Hercules Victor and the Temple of Portunus, the Temples of the Forum Boarium date back to approximately the second century BC. The Temple of... Read More

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Termessos

Nestled on the slopes of the Güllük Mountain the majestic ruins of the ancient city of Termessos are surrounded by outstanding natural beauty.

Located high in the mountains at Güllük National Park, the picturesque city of Termessos is perhaps one of the best preserved Roman/Hellenistic ruins in Turkey. Founded by the Solyms, an ancient Anataolian community, the early history of the inhabitants of this city is relatively obscure, however it is known that the... Read More

Tharros

Tharros, in Sardinia, was founded by the Phoenicians and contains mostly Roman ruins.

Tharros is an archaeological site in Sardinia brimming with centuries of history. Founded in the eighth century BC by the Phoenicians, Tharros would be inhabited by the Carthaginians and the Romans, leaving behind a series of ancient structures, especially its two standing Corinthian columns. Among the other highlights of the... Read More

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The Altes Museum

The Altes Museum in Berlin contains a collection of Ancient Greek and Roman artifacts.

The Altes Museum is part of Germany’s National Museum and is located in Berlin. Displaying part of the National Museum’s collection of classical antiquities, even the building of the Altes Museum has been built in a style inspired by Ancient Greece. One of the main collections at the Altes Museum is... Read More

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The Antonine Baths

One of the largest ancient bath complexes ever built, the ruins of the second century Antonine Baths are a real treasure to explore.

The Antonine Baths was a huge Roman bath complex in ancient Carthage, the well-preserved ruins of which can still be viewed today. Originally built from 145 to 165 AD, mostly during the reign of the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius, the Antonine Baths were among the largest baths to be... Read More

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The Antonine Wall

The Antonine Wall was a Roman defensive wall, the remains of which can now be seen in Scotland.

The Antonine Wall was a Roman defensive wall which ran from Old Kilpatrick to Carriden, along what is now Scotland’s central belt. In 138AD, under the orders of Emperor Antoninus Pius, the Roman 6th and 20th legions began building The Antonine Wall. They would complete it a mere two years later,... Read More

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The Ara Pacis Museum

The Ara Pacis Museum displays the Emperor Augustus’s Altar of Peace.

The Ara Pacis Museum (Museo dell Ara Pacis) in Rome houses the Altar of Peace, which was built under instructions from the Emperor Augustus and sanctioned by the Senate. Augustus decided to build the Ara Pacis to celebrate his military campaigns which resulted in the outbreak of peace in the... Read More

The Barbara Baths - Trier

The Barbara Baths were a second century baths complex of Roman Trier. UNESCO listed.

The Barbara Baths (Barbarathermen) in Trier are a set of ruins of a second century Roman baths complex. A little of the original Barbara Baths can be seen above ground today, but this pales in comparison to the Imperial Baths of Trier. This is due to the fact that most... Read More

The Bardo Museum

The Bardo Museum is an archaeological museum in Tunisia most renowned for its Roman mosaic collection.

The Bardo Museum (Le Musee National du Bardo) in Tunis is Tunisia’s national archaeological museum and contains artefacts from throughout the country’s history. From prehistoric items to Punic ceremonial artefacts believed to be connected with practices of human sacrifice and right through to art from the Islamic era, the Bardo Museum... Read More

The Beule Gate

The Beule Gate was built in the third century AD as part of a defensive wall.

The Beule Gate is one of the first things you see when entering the Acropolis complex and was built in the third century AD as part of a defensive wall. Discovered in 1852, the Beule Gate was named after archaeologist Ernest Beule.... Read More

The Caesarea Aqueduct

The Caesarea Aqueduct is the remaining section of the aqueduct that supplied the Roman city of Caesarea.

The Caesarea Aqueduct is the picturesque, well-preserved ruin of the ancient Roman aqueduct which served the city of Caesarea. Mostly constructed during the reign of King Herod the Great, the majority of the great public buildings, infrastructure and monuments of Caesarea were built from around 22 BC onwards. The city became a... Read More

The Claudio Aqueduct - Rome

The Claudio Aqueduct is an Ancient Roman aqueduct which served Rome from 52 AD.

The Claudio Aqueduct (Acquedotto Claudio) was one of Rome’s ancient aqueducts. Whilst it was the Emperor Claudius, after whom it is named, who completed the Claudio Aqueduct in 52 AD, it was his predecessor, the Emperor Caligula who began its construction in 38AD. Today, parts of the Claudio Aqueduct are fairly... Read More

The Coenaculum - Jerusalem

The Coenaculum in Jerusalem is a Crusader-built structure at the believed location of The Last Supper.

The Coenaculum in Jerusalem is a room built by the Crusaders in the fourteenth century, later taken over by the Franciscans and then transformed into a mosque by the Ottomans in the sixteenth century. However, for Christians, it is best known as the “Last Supper Room”, the upper room where Jesus... Read More

The Cryptoporticus

The Cryptoporticus of Reims is a very well preserved third century AD Roman passageway.

The Cryptoporticus (Le Cryptoportique) of Reims is is a very well preserved third century AD Roman passageway. At the time, Reims was a Gallo-Roman town known as Durocortorum. Like other structures of this kind, the Cryptoporticus of Reims was a semi-subterranean arched passageway, the roof of which would have been a... Read More

The Gier Aqueduct

The Gier Aqueduct near Lyon served its Roman counterpart, Lugdunum.

The Gier Aqueduct was a Roman aqueduct used by the Gallo-Roman city of Lugdunum, which would later become the city of Lyon. At the time, the Gier Aqueduct would have been one of four aqueducts supplying water to this important and highly populated city. Today, the impressively restored remains of the... Read More

The Hermitage

The Hermitage is a world renowned museum in St Petersburg which includes a vast array of global exhibits ranging from ancient artefacts and archaeological finds to modern history.

The Hermitage is a vast museum complex in St. Petersburg housing around three million historic and archaeological artefacts, paintings, sculptures, numismatics and other works. It is one of world’s most well-renowned museums, with an astonishing array of exhibits ranging from the art and culture of ancient civilisations such as the... Read More

The House of Augustus

The House of Augustus on the Palatine Hill was the home of Rome’s first emperor.

The House of Augustus, located on the eminent Palatine Hill, was the modest home of Ancient Rome’s first emperor, Augustus. The grandnephew and heir of Julius Caesar, Augustus lived in this house for many years. The House of Augustus should not be confused with Domus Augustana, which was the later palace... Read More

The House of Livia

One of the most interesting Roman sites for fans of the famous I Claudius novels, the House of Livia was the home of Augustus’s third wife.

The House of Livia, also known as Livia’s House or Livia’s Villa, was the home of the third wife of Augustus, the first emperor of the Roman Empire, and the mother of its second emperor, Tiberius. Powerful and formidable, Livia was an important figure of Ancient Rome, a status she managed... Read More

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The Iseum

The Iseum is a 2nd century AD Roman temple site dedicated to the Egyptian godess Isis.

The Iseum, also known as the Isis Szentély Romkertje, in Szombathely is a restored 2nd century AD Roman temple site dedicated to the Egyptian goddess Isis. Excavated since the 1950’s, the ruins of the two temples of the Iseum can be seen today and part of the site has been... Read More

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The Los Milagros Aqueduct

The Los Milagros Aqueduct in Merida supplied water to the Ancient Roman city of Augusta Emerita.

The Los Milagros Aqueduct (Acueducto de Los Milagros) is an incredibly well-preserved Roman water supply system in Merida, Spain. Comprised of a trio of levels of looming brick arches, the remains of the Los Milagros Aqueduct are a fantastic example of Roman engineering. In ancient Roman times, the Los Milagros Aqueduct... Read More

The Lyon Gallo-Roman Tombs

The Lyon Gallo-Roman Tombs are a trio of reconstructed first century burial chambers.

The Lyon Gallo-Roman Tombs (Tombeaux Gallo-Romain) are three reconstructed ancient burial chambers displayed at Place Eugène-Wernert. Dating from the 1st century AD, these tombs were discovered in the late 19th century during works constructing the railway system. In order to ensure their preservation, the tombs were painstakingly moved brick by brick... Read More

The Magne Tower

The Magne Tower in Nimes is a well preserved Roman tower built under the Emperor Augustus.

The Magne Tower (Tour Magne) is an impressive Roman tower built under the Emperor Augustus in the 1st century BC as part of the fortifications of Nimes. In fact, it is the town’s sole remaining tower from this period. Beyond its Roman roots, the Magne Tower also played a role in... Read More

The Palatine Hill Stadium

The Palatine Hill Stadium was part of the imperial palace of Ancient Rome’s emperors.

The partially-intact Palatine Hill Stadium once formed part of Domus Augustana, the imperial palace of Rome’s emperors. Built by the Emperor Domitian, the Domus Augustana was a magnificent palace used as the primary residence of many of Rome’s emperors. The exact purpose of the Palatine Hill Stadium itself is unknown, with... Read More

The Palatine Museum

The Palatine Museum exhibits ancient finds from the famous Palatine Hill in Rome.

The Palatine Museum (Museo Palatino) on Rome’s Palatine Hill houses a collection of finds from this incredible archaeological site. With artefacts dating back as far as the Middle Palaeolithic era, the Palatine Museum offers a good overview of the area considered to be the birthplace of Rome. The main exhibits at... Read More

The Regia

The Regia in Rome’s Forum was a royal residence turned office of the Pontifex Maximus.

The Regia, the remains of which are located in the Roman Forum, was initially the royal residence of the first kings of ancient Rome. It later became the seat of Rome’s most high ranking priest, the Pontifex Maximus. Among many notable names to hold this position, Julius Caesar would have... Read More

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The Roman Lighthouse

The Roman Lighthouse in Dover is a ruined first century AD Roman tower which is one of the best-preserved of its kind anywhere in the world.

The Roman Lighthouse in Dover is a ruined first century AD Roman tower which originally served to guide shipping into the ancient Roman port of Dubris. Today it is one of the best-preserved of its kind anywhere in the world. The original octagonal structure was 24m tall and consisted of six... Read More

The Surgeon’s House - Rimini

The Surgeon’s House is an archaeological site which uncovers Rimini’s past from Ancient Roman times.

The Surgeon’s House (Domus del Chirurgo) in Rimini, Italy, is an archaeological site known locally as “little Pompeii”. Spanning an area of over 700 square metres, the Surgeon’s House is a collection of archaeological sites discovered in 1998 and excavated over the course of almost a decade. This attraction is known as... Read More

The Temple of Vesta

The Temple of Vesta was an Ancient Roman shrine now found on the Roman Forum.

The Temple of Vesta was an ancient Roman shrine dedicated to the goddess of the hearth, the remains of which are found in the southeast of the Roman Forum. Serving as the temple of the Vestal Virgins, the priestesses dedicated to Vesta, the Temple of Vesta housed an eternal flame... Read More

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The Zaghouan Aqueduct

Built by the Emperor Hadrian, the Zaghouan Aqueduct supplied water to the Roman city of Carthage and stretched for over 100 miles.

The Zaghouan Aqueduct - or Aqueduct of Hadrian - was a Roman aqueduct which supplied water to the ancient city of Carthage, the ruins of which can still be seen today. Built around 130 AD, during the reign of the Emperor Hadrian, the Zaghouan Aqueduct was constructed as a... Read More

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Theatre of Herodes Atticus

The Theatre of Herodes Atticus is a Roman amphitheatre built in Athens in 161AD.

The Theatre of Herodes Atticus, also known as the Odeon, is a Greco-Roman theatre built in 161 AD. It is named after an affluent Greek-born Roman senator, Herodes Atticus, who constructed it in commemoration of his wife, Regilia. Able to seat up to 5,000 people, the Theatre of Herodes Atticus was mostly... Read More

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Theatre of Marcellus

The partially-preserved remains of one of the most important theatres in ancient Rome, built by Julius Caesar and Augustus.

Though only partially preserved, the ruins of the Theatre of Marcellus in Rome are among the oldest remains of an ancient Roman theatre to have survived. One of the most important ancient Roman public buildings, the Theatre of Marcellus was the brainchild of Julius Caesar himself, though the Roman dictator did... Read More

Tiberius Bridge - Rimini

Tiberius Bridge is a first century Roman Bridge in Rimini.

Tiberius Bridge (Ponte di Tiberio) in Rimini is an Ancient Roman arched bridge begun by the Emperor Augustus and completed by Emperor Tiberius in approximately 20 AD. Crossing the Marecchia River, the extremely well-preserved Tiberius Bridge is still in use today.... Read More

Timgad

The Roman ruins of Timgad are the extremely well-preserved remains of an Ancient Roman military encampment in Algeria.

The ruins of Timgad in Algeria are an impressive set of ancient Roman remains and rank among the best such ruins in North Africa. Founded by the Emperor Trajan in 100 AD, the settlement of Timgad, then known as Thamugas, was probably a base for the Third Augustan Legion. Timgad was... Read More

Tomb of Eurysaces the Baker

The Tomb of Eurysaces the Baker is an impressive ancient tomb dating back to 30BC.

The Tomb of Eurysaces the Baker is an impressive and peculiar ancient tomb in Rome dating back to around 30BC. The tomb was built by a former slave turned wealthy freeman named Marcus Vergilius Eurysaces – who made his fortune as a grand baker and contractor. Unique in shape and design, it... Read More

Trajan Arch of Ancona

The Trajan Arch of Ancona is an Ancient Roman monument to the Emperor Trajan.

The Trajan Arch of Ancona (L’Arco di Traiano di Ancona) is a second century monument built in honour of the Emperor Trajan. Designed by Apollodorus of Damascus and constructed in 115 AD to thank the emperor for his renovation of the local harbour, the Trajan Arch of Ancona would have been... Read More

Trajan Arch of Benevento

The Trajan Arch of Benevento is a 2nd century AD triumphal arch built for the Emperor Trajan.

The Trajan Arch of Benevento (Arco di Traiano di Benevento) is one of several Arches of Trajan built in honour of this famous Roman emperor. Originally located along the Appia Antica, one of the oldest roads leading to Rome, the Trajan Arch of Benevento was constructed between 114 AD and 116... Read More

Trajan Arch of Merida

The Trajan Arch of Merida is a UNESCO listed Ancient Roman granite gateway.

The Trajan Arch of Merida is part of UNESCO’s Archaeological Ensemble of Mérida and has in the past been said to have been a triumphal arch to the Emperor Trajan. However, this has been cast into doubt and historians now think it may have been the entry gate to the... Read More

Trajan’s Markets

Trajan’s Markets was an Ancient Roman administrative centre located on Trajan’s Forum.

The site of Trajan’s Markets, located in the Forum of Trajan in Rome, is one of the best preserved elements of the ancient city to have survived, and is an oft-overlooked gem in the heart of the Eternal City. The impressive semi-circular remains of this grand structure, built between 100 and... Read More

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Trasimene Battlefield

Trasimene Battlefield is the location of major defeat of the Roman army by Hannibal during the Second Punic War.

Trasimene Battlefield marks the site of the Battle of Trasimene, fought in 217 BC between Hannibal of Carthage and the Consul Flaminius of Rome. It was one of the major battles of the Second Punic War and a crushing defeat for Rome. During the encounter, Hannibal - a gifted strategist -... Read More

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Trebbia Battlefield

Location of the first major battle of the Second Punic War between Hannibal and the Roman consuls Scipio and Longus.

Trebbia Battlefield marks the location of the Battle of Trebbia, the first significant clash of the Second Punic War. Fought in 218 BC, it was a resounding defeat for the Roman armies under the consuls Scipio and Longus and a major victory for the great Carthaginian general Hannibal. A resounding defeat... Read More

Trier Cathedral

Trier Cathedral is a mostly medieval, UNESCO-listed church with a history dating back to Roman times.

Trier Cathedral, called Trierer Dom in German, is the main church of the city of Trier. The site of Trier Cathedral has a rich Christian history dating back to at least 270 AD, when worshippers attended what was probably the first church to have existed at this location – a... Read More

Trier Roman Amphitheatre

Trier Roman Amphitheatre is a well preserved UNESCO site in use as early as the first century.

Trier Roman Amphitheatre may have been constructed as early as the first century AD, but was certainly in use by the second century. Able to hold around 20,000 spectators, Trier Roman Amphitheatre would have been the site of fierce gladiatorial battles, also involving animals. In fact, tunnels have been found under... Read More

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Trimontium Museum

The Roman fort of Trimontium no longer stands, but the nearby museum uses artefacts and replicas to tell a story of a military power and the struggles that took place on the border with Scotland.

Unfortunately no upstanding stones remain of the Roman fort at Newstead, but visitors to the Trimontium Museum in nearby Melrose can still get a tangible insight into life in the Roman frontiers through a wide variety of artefacts and reproductions. A guided walk run by the Trimontium Museum also points out... Read More

Triumphal Arch of Orange

The Triumphal Arch of Orange is a first century Roman arch built during the reign of Augustus.

The Triumphal Arch of Orange (Arc de Triomphe d’Orange) is an Ancient Roman monumental gate, probably built during the reign of Augustus. Originally built on what was via Agrippa, it is thought that the Triumphal Arch of Orange was built in honour of those who fought in the Gallic Wars, particularly... Read More

Tropaeum Alpium

The Tropaeum Alpium, also known as Trophee des Alpes or the Trophy of Augustus, is a Roman monument dedicated to the Emperor Augustus.

The Tropaeum Alpium, also known as Trophee des Alpes or the Trophy of Augustus, is a Roman monument dedicated to the Emperor Augustus built to commemorate his victories over the various tribes who inhabited this region. Built in approximately 6 BC, the Tropaeum Alpium was built on the highest point of... Read More

Underground Library of Alexandria

The underground library of Alexandria once formed part of the city’s famous Great Library and can be found under the ruins of the Serapeum.

The underground library of Alexandria, found underneath the ruins of the Serapeum, consists of a series of subterranean tunnels and storerooms where it is believed part of the collection of the Great Library of Alexandria was stored. The Great Library itself was constructed in the third century BC and was... Read More

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Valley of the Temples

The Valley of the Temples is a UNESCO-listed site in Sicily housing the very well-preserved remains of several Ancient Greek temples.

The Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi) is a famous archaeological site in Sicily housing some of the best preserved Ancient Greek ruins in the world, especially outside Greece. Agrigento, in which they are located, had been a Greek colony since the 6th century BC. Really more of a ridge... Read More

Varna Roman Baths

Varna Roman Baths is one of the biggest surviving Roman baths complexes in Europe.

Varna Roman Baths are a large semi-ruined set of public baths from Roman times believed to have been built in the 2nd century AD. In fact, with their span of over 7,500 square metres, it is said that Varna Roman Baths are Europe’s largest baths after Rome’s baths of Diocletian... Read More

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Velia Archaeological Site

The Velia Archaeological Site contains Greek, Roman and medieval ruins of the city initially founded as Elea.

The Velia Archaeological Site (Scavi di Velia) in Campania houses the remains of a Greek colony turned Roman municipality. Velia was originally founded by a Greek community as the colony of “Elea” in 540 BC. With the help of prominent citizens and philosophers Zeno and Parmenides (the latter having founded... Read More

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Verona Arena

Verona Arena is a stunning Roman amphitheatre built in 30AD.

Verona Arena (Arena di Verona) is a stunning Roman amphitheatre built in 30AD and said to have been the third largest of its time after the Colosseum and Campania Amphitheatre, which served ancient Capua.  Built during the first half of the 1st century AD, Verona Arena was originally made up of... Read More

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Verulamium

Verulamium was a Roman settlement near modern day St Albans in England.

Verulamium was a prominent Roman settlement near modern day St Albans in England. Formerly the tribal capital of the native Catuvellauni tribe, Verulamium was conquered by the Romans during their invasion of the island in 43 AD. By 50 AD, Verulamium had become a major Roman town, and as such was... Read More

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Via Appia Antica

Via Appia Antica, built in 312 BC, is one of the most important roads leading to Rome.

Via Appia Antica, also known as the Appian Way, is one of the oldest and most important roads leading to Rome. Built in 312 BC, it was slowly extended and, by 191 BC, it reached the port of Brindisi, over 550km southeast of the city (along the “heel” of Italy).... Read More

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Vienne Roman Theatre

Vienne Roman Theatre is a first century theatre said to have once been amongst the largest in Gaul.

Vienne Roman Theatre (Theatre Antique de Vienne) is a first century AD theatre said to have once been amongst the largest in Gaul. Built sometime around 40 to 50AD, it was originally able to house 13,000 spectators. From games and shows to public meetings, at its peak Vienne Roman Theatre... Read More

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Villa dei Quintili

Villa dei Quintili is an extremely well-preserved second century AD villa in Rome’s suburbs.

Villa dei Quintili, translated as the Villa of the Quintili, was one of the most lavish homes along the famous road that leads to Rome, the Via Appia. In 151 AD, the main part of the Villa dei Quintili was owned by the senior officials, the Quintili brothers. Consuls under the... Read More

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Villa Gregoriana

Villa Gregoriana is a park in Tivoli which mixes natural and archaeological beauty to great effect.

Villa Gregoriana is a park in Tivoli, Italy which seamlessly blends natural and man-made wonders. Commissioned by Pope Gregory XVI, from whom it takes its name, in 1835, Villa Gregoriana was laid-out in the bed of the Aniene River at the foot of Tivoli's Acropolis. Its aim was to protect... Read More

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Villa Jovis

Villa Jovis was the cliff-top Capri home of Roman Emperor Tiberius.

Villa Jovis, meaning the Villa of Jupiter, on the island of Capri was the home of the Roman Emperor Tiberius for ten years from 27 AD until his death in 37 AD. Built by Tiberius in a secluded part of the island amidst cliffs and steep slopes, Villa Jovis was... Read More

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Villa Poppaea

Villa Poppea was the home of the second wife of the Roman Emperor Nero.

Villa Poppaea contains the remains of a grand ancient Roman residence in the Oplontis site, near Pompeii in Italy. Dating back to the 1st century AD, Villa Poppaea was expanded in the Claudian era and was believed to have belonged to Poppaea Sabina, the second wife of the emperor Nero.... Read More

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Villa Romana del Casale

Villa Romana del Casale is a UNESCO-listed Roman villa in Sicily containing some of the world’s best preserved Roman mosaics.

Villa Romana del Casale is a UNESCO-listed Ancient Roman villa in Piazza Armerina in Sicily, containing some of the world’s best preserved Roman mosaics. Thought to have been built sometime between 310 AD and 340 AD, Villa Romana del Casale was constructed atop an earlier (probably first century AD) villa which... Read More

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Vindolanda

Vindolanda was one of the main Ancient Roman wall forts of Hadrian’s Wall in Britain.

Vindolanda was one of the main Ancient Roman wall forts of Hadrian’s Wall, the 73-mile barrier built by the Emperor Hadrian from 122 AD. However, Vindolanda is thought to have been inhabited by the Romans from 85 AD, following the victory of the Roman Governor Agricola at the Battle of Mons... Read More

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Volubilis

Volubilis near Meknes in Morocco was an Ancient Roman city developed in the first century BC.

Volubilis in Morocco is a UNESCO-listed ancient Roman site housing extensive ruins dating back to the first century BC. Already a thriving town, the Romans developed Volubilis from approximately 25 BC, during the reign of Juba II, a Berber prince appointed as the ruler of the region by the Emperor Augustus.... Read More

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Wales National Roman Legion Museum

The Wales National Roman Legion Museum explores the history and legacy of the Roman Empire’s furthest outpost.

The Wales National Roman Legion Museum explores the history and legacy of the Roman Empire’s furthest outpost - Wales. This small museum houses a range of artefacts including everyday utensils and pottery. Amongst its main highlights, the Wales National Roman Legion Museum has an impressive Roman gemstone collection, the... Read More

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Wall Roman site

The Wall Roman site in Staffordshire houses the ruins of an Ancient Roman inn.

The Wall Roman site in Staffordshire houses the remains of what was a Roman military staging site, essentially an inn or “mansio” along the ancient route towards Wales. Then known as Letocetum, the Wall Roman site was a convenient stop along this important military road. Visitors to the Wall Roman site –... Read More

Weiden Roman Burial Chamber

The Weiden Roman Burial Chamber is an Ancient Roman tomb on the outskirts of modern day Cologne.

The Weiden Roman Burial Chamber (Römische Grabkammer in Weiden) is a second century tomb found on the outskirts of modern day Cologne. As was typical at the time, the Roman Burial Chamber in Weiden was built on the way out of the city, then known as Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium. Elaborate and... Read More

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Welwyn Roman Baths

The Welwyn Roman Baths complex houses the remains of a Roman bathhouse dating back to the 3rd Century AD.

The Welwyn Roman Baths complex houses the remains of a Roman bathhouse dating back to the 3rd century AD. Originally part of a larger Roman Villa, the Welwyn Roman Baths are housed in a unique environment - an underground chamber built nine metres below the A1(M) motorway. Excavations took place before... Read More

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Whitley Castle

This little-known, remote Roman fort in the North Pennines bordering Cumbria and Northumberland is not only the highest stone-built Roman fort in Britain, it has the most complex defensive earthworks of any known fort in the entire Roman Empire.

Stewart Ainsworth from Channel 4’s Time Team called Whitley Castle ‘the best preserved fort in the Roman Empire’ and it’s hard to disagree. Also known as Epiacum (the first town in northern England occupied by the Celtic, pre-Roman Brigantes tribe and probably named for a local chief), Whitley Castle in... Read More

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Wroxeter Roman City

Wroxeter Roman City houses the remains of what was once Roman Britain’s fourth largest city.

Wroxeter Roman City is an impressive Ancient Roman site in Shropshire. It houses the remains of what was once known as Viroconium, at one time Roman Britain’s fourth largest city. In fact, Viroconium was initially a first Century garrisoned fort which evolved into a city. Around 5,000 people lived in Viroconium... Read More

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Xanten Archaeological Park

Xanten Archaeological Park houses the remains of the former Roman settlement of Colonia Ulpia Traiana.

Xanten Archaeological Park (Archaologischer Park Xanten) houses the remains of the former Roman settlement of Colonia Ulpia Traiana. The area of the park was first garrisoned by Roman legions in around 13 BC and soon flourished. Roads and a harbour were built as was a vast military camp and,... Read More

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York City Walls

The York City Walls are England’s most intact set of city walls and one of the city’s most popular attractions.

The York City Walls are England’s most complete set of city walls and one of the city’s most popular attractions. Made up of structures built at different times of the city’s history, resplendent with four main ornate stone gateways known as “bars” and 34 towers and offering a great way... Read More

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York Minster

York Minster is one of the largest gothic cathedrals in northern Europe, built by the Normans and expanded over the centuries.

York Minster is a vast gothic cathedral – one of the largest in Northern Europe – officially known as The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of St Peter in York. The term “Minster” is attributed to the cathedral as it was a teaching church founded by the Anglo Saxons. In fact, the... Read More

Yorkshire Museum

The Yorkshire Museum is a true celebration of two thousand years of history of one of the UK’s most beautiful, traditional and influential cities.

The Yorkshire Museum was opened in 1830 by the Yorkshire Philosophical Society and is a celebration of two millennia of history of one of the UK’s most beautiful, traditional and influential cities. One of the UKs first purpose-built museums, it reopened in 2010 after a £2m refurbishment project. The Yorkshire Museum... Read More

Zadar Roman Forum

Zadar Roman Forum dates back as far as the 1st century BC and is an excellent example of its kind.

Zadar Roman Forum was built between the 1st century BC and the 3rd century AD and would have been the centre of everyday life in Roman Zadar. An excellent example of its kind, the Zadar Roman Forum is still home to several monuments as well as being found at in... Read More

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Zeugma

The remains of this important Roman city are under excavation in Turkey. Though not open to the public, many finds from the site can be seen in the Gaziantep Zeugma Mosaic Museum.

Zeugma was one of the most important cities of the Roman Empire in the East. Originally founded around 300 BC by one of Alexander’s successors, his general Seleucus Nicator, the city was a vital trading point across the Euphrates River. The military and commercial importance of Zeugma led to major growth... Read More