Pre-Historic Sites

If you’re looking to explore pre-historic sites and want to find the best places to view prehistoric places then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s a great selection of prehistoric sites and you can plan some fantastic things to see on your trips. Once you’ve explored the list of pre-historic locations and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring pre-historic sites.

Our database of historic places is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other  Pre-History sites, remains or ruins, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

Pre-History: Site Index

Photo by BluEyedA73 (cc)

Akrotiri

Akrotiri is a beautifully preserved ancient site in Santorini, famed for its incredible frescos and its connection with the Minoans.

Akrotiri is a beautifully preserved ancient site in Santorini, famed for its incredible frescos and its connection with the Minoans. In fact, Akrotiri was inhabited as early as the 4th millennium BC - some say earlier - during the late Neolithic period. It would then thrive and grow into a... Read More

Albufeira Municipal Archaeological Museum

The Albufeira Municipal Archaeological Museum exhibits a collection of artefacts relating to the history of the area.

The Albufeira Municipal Archaeological Museum (Museu Municipal de Arqueologia de Albufeira) exhibits a small collection of artefacts relating to the history of the area dating from the prehistoric to the Roman, the Moorish up to the seventeenth century.... Read More

Photo by ellevalentine (cc)

Arles Archaeological Museum

The Arles Archaeological Museum houses an extensive collection of prehistoric and Ancient Roman artefacts.

The Arles Archaeological Museum, known as Musée de l’Arles et de la Provence Antique, displays an array of artefacts from archaeological sites in Arles and in the surrounding region. From prehistoric funereal pieces to Roman statues and mosaics from the nearby sites such as the Arles Roman Theatre, the Arles Archaeological... Read More

Photo by jaybergesen (cc)

Athens National Archaeological Museum

Athens National Archaeological Museum is one of the most prominent of its kind in the world and has over 20,000 pieces.

Athens National Archaeological Museum is the largest museum in Greece, housing over 20,000 exhibits spread over 8,000 square metres of an imposing nineteenth century building. With permanent exhibitions ranging from the Neolithic era and the Mycenaean era to the Ancient Romans and even the Ancient Egyptians, the Athens National Archaeological Museum’s... Read More

Photo by Jule_Berlin (cc)

Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery

Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery in Ireland is one of the largest and most impressive cemeteries of its kind.

Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery is a prehistoric burial site where archaeologists have found sixty graves believed to predate Egypt’s pyramids. In fact, the graves at Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery are thought to date back to between 3500 and 4500 BC. Today, visitors can see up to thirty of these prehistoric tombs and an... Read More

Photo by jessogden1 (cc)

Catalhoyuk

Catalhoyuk is the site of an important Neolithic town in Turkey.

Catalhoyuk is the site of a Neolithic town in Turkey dating back to between 7400 and 6000 BC. Containing some of the earliest ever known mural art, Catalhoyuk is considered to be vital in learning about the country’s origins. Catalhoyuk also has a visitor centre with exhibits, although most... Read More

Photo by isawnyu (cc)

Choirokoitia

Choirokoitia was a prehistoric settlement and the first site of human habitation in Cyprus.

Choirokoitia in Cyprus was a prehistoric agricultural settlement from 7000BC and the first site of human habitation on the island. According to UNESCO, who have inscribed it as a World Heritage site, Choirokoitia is "one of the most important prehistoric sites in the eastern Mediterranean", particularly as it played a... Read More

Photo by tpholland (cc)

Din Lligwy

Din Lligwy is the site of a prehistoric settlement in Anglesey in Wales.

Din Lligwy is a prehistoric site in Anglesey in Wales. Thought to have been in existence in the Iron Age and to have been inhabited for a long period of time, excavated pieces from Din Lligwy have been dated to the fourth century AD. Din Lligwy is comprised of a small... Read More

Photo by thebaldwin (cc)

Epidaurus

Epidaurus was a city of Ancient Greece located on the Greek mainland. Its incredible ruins are a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Epidaurus was a major city in Ancient Greece famed as a centre for healing. Inhabited since prehistoric times, Epidaurus thrived as a sanctuary devoted to the healing deities including Apollo, Asklepios and Hygeia and contained hundreds of spas, the remains of many of which can be seen today. The main sanctuary area,... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Fourknocks

Fourknocks is a megalithic burial site in the Republic of Ireland.

Fourknocks is a collection of passage graves located in County Meath in the Republic Of Ireland. Excavated in the early 1950’s, archaeologists have dated them back to the megalithic era. The dozens of graves found at Fourknocks are hidden beneath large mounds and are decorated with prehistoric artwork including a rough... Read More

Galdar Archaeological Site

The Galdar Archaeological Site houses the best preserved remains of the prehistoric inhabitants of the Canary Islands.

The Galdar Archaeological Site houses the best preserved remains of the prehistoric inhabitants of the Canary Islands. Known as the Guanches, these were the indigenous people of the islands and are believed to have originated from North Africa sometime in the first millennium BC. The Galdar Archaeological Site is... Read More

Photo by foxypar4 (cc)

Ggantija Temples

The Ggantija Temples are a UNESCO-listed megalithic temple complex on the Maltese island of Gozo.

The Ggantija Temples are a UNESCO-listed megalithic temple complex on the island of Gozo and some of the world’s oldest surviving religious structures. Comprised of two well preserved stone temples enclosed by a wall, it is unclear as to exactly when the Ggantija Temples were built. UNESCO put their... Read More

Photo by Tracey and Doug (cc)

Grotte de Font de Gaume

Grotte de Font de Gaume is a prehistoric cave in Les Eyzies, France.

Grotte de Font de Gaume in Les Eyzies, France is a cave containing a series of prehistoric paintings dating back to the Stone Age. From horses to reindeer and bison, the paintings at Grotte de Font de Gaume are truly fascinating and this is one of the few prehistoric cave sites... Read More

Photo by melissa.delzio (cc)

Grotte des Combarelles

Grotte des Combarelles is a cave in southwest France with prehistoric paintings.

Grotte des Combarelles in southwest France is a cave which houses a series of prehistoric paintings of various animals and people as well as symbols. Grotte des Combarelles forms part of the UNESCO World Heritage site of the painted caves of the Vezere Valley.... Read More

Photo by bjbrake (cc)

Hagar Qim

Hagar Qim is one of Malta’s UNESCO-listed megalithic temples.

Hagar Qim is one of Malta’s UNESCO-listed megalithic temples. Dating back to between 3600BC and 3200BC, Hagar Qim is a single temple which stands dramatically on a cliff-edge, although it may once have been a larger complex. There are also some other prehistoric structures nearby. It’s worth noting that Hagar Qim... Read More

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Hill of Tara

The Hill of Tara was the royal seat of the High Kings of Ireland for thousands of years and is home to a Stone Age passage grave.

The Hill of Tara (Cnoc na Teamhrach) was the royal seat of the High Kings of Ireland for thousands of years, becoming the site of over a hundred coronations. It is also home to a Stone Age passage grave. In fact, with a history stretching back as far... Read More

Photo by MarilynJane (cc)

Hod Hill

Hod Hill is one of the largest Iron Age hillforts in Dorset.

Hod Hill is an Iron Age hillfort and one of the largest of its kind in Dorset. With its imposing size and ramparts, Hod Hill would have defended a village. In 44 AD, it is likely to have been captured by the Romans during their invasion of Britain. The Roman Second... Read More

Photo by zozo2k3 (cc)

Hungarian National Museum

The Hungarian National Museum is a museum of history, archaeology and art in Budapest.

The Hungarian National Museum exhibits a comprehensive collection of historic artefacts, documents and works of art. Its collections is incredibly diverse, ranging from bone tools from the Palaeolithic era to 45,000 twentieth century posters relating to significant political, social and cultural events.One of the main sections of the Hungarian National... Read More

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Kakadu National Park

Kakadu National Park is home to the famous aboriginal rock art dating back at least 20,000 years and is a World Heritage Site.

Kakadu National Park in Northern Australia has been the home of aboriginal tribes for over 50,000 years, in particular the Bininji/Mungguy people. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, over 5,000 historical sites have been found at Kakadu National Park, those most famous aspect of which is its rock art. Painted on sandstone... Read More

Photo by Leonid Mamchenkov (cc)

Kalavasos-Tenta

Kalavasos-Tenta in Cyprus houses the remains of a Neolithic settlement.

Kalavasos-Tenta (or just "Tenta") is an archaeological site in Cyprus housing the remains of a Neolithic settlement dating back to the eighth millennium BC. The ruins at Kalavasos-Tenta include the remains of the winding walls of what were the circular huts of the village.... Read More

Karlsstenen

Karlsstenen is a Neolithic burial mound in Northwest Zealand, Denmark.

Karlsstenen or “Karl’s Stone” is a well-preserved Neolithic burial mound or “dolmen” in Denmark’s Northwest Zealand region. Comprised of a mound of stones, Karlsstenen is located in a forest known as Gronnese Skov , which is around 4.7 km east of Hundested.... Read More

Photo by dccrowley (cc)

Knowth

Knowth is one of three prehistoric burial mounds in Ireland which make up the World Heritage site of the Bend of the Boyne.

Knowth is one of three prehistoric burial mounds in Ireland which make up the World Heritage site of the Bend of the Boyne (Brugh na Boinne). The oldest aspects of Knowth date back to the Neolithic period, moving through to the Iron Age when it was fortified. Knowth thrived... Read More

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Maiden Castle

Maiden Castle is vast, well preserved Iron Age hill fort in Dorchester.

Maiden Castle is vast, well preserved Iron Age hill fort in Dorchester. Its name is believed to be derived from two Celtic words, ‘Mai’ and ‘Dun’, meaning “Great Hill”. Imposing and incredibly complex, Maiden Castle would certainly have posed a great challenge to anyone wishing to invade it. Whilst the site... Read More

Photo by DoNotLick (cc)

Mnajdra

Mnajdra is a coastal megalithic temple complex in Malta listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Mnajdra is a coastal megalithic temple complex in Malta listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site. The earliest of the Mnajdra temples was built sometime between 3600BC and 3200BC, dating back to the Ggantija phase, although there are several temple remains.... Read More

Moesgard Museum

The Moesgard Museum is an archaeological museum near Arhus in Denmark.

The Moesgard Museum near Arhus in Denmark is a museum of archaeology, with a diverse set of displays. Amongst its impressive collection, the Moesgard Museum houses the Grauballe Man, which is the incredibly well-preserved mummy of a prehistoric man believed to have lived around 2,000 years ago. The body was found... Read More

Musée d’Aquitaine

Musée d’Aquitaine in Bordeaux, France is a museum of the archaeology and history of the region.

Musée d’Aquitaine (The Aquitaine Museum) is a museum of archaeology and history in Bordeaux, France. Chronicling the history of Bordeaux and Aquitaine since prehistoric times, Musée d’Aquitaine has collections ranging from Gallo-Roman and ethnographic to the Middle Ages. Musée d’Aquitaine has over 700,000 pieces spread over 5,000 square metres.... Read More

Musée d’art et d’archéologie du Périgord

Musée d’art et d’archéologie du Périgord contains pieces dating back as far as 70,000 years ago.

Musée d’art et d’archéologie du Périgord (Périgueux Museum of Art and Archaeology) displays a wide range of art and artefacts dating back as far as 70,000 years ago and spanning, amongst others, the Roman and medieval eras. Much of the Musée d’art et d’archéologie du Périgord is concerned with burial rituals and,... Read More

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Musee National de Prehistoire

Musee National de Prehistoire is a national prehistoric museum in southwest France.

Musee National de Prehistoire or the National Prehistoric Museum in Les Eyzies, France, displays an impressive collection of 18,000 prehistoric artefacts, mostly excavated from the Vézère Valley. Through displays, original pieces and timelines, Musee National de Prehistoire offers an overview of the prehistoric past of this region of France and is... Read More

Museum of Orange

The Museum of Orange is a museum of mostly Roman, but also prehistoric, artefacts found in the region.

The Museum of Orange (Musee D’Orange) is an archaeological museum across the road from the UNESCO-listed Roman Theatre of Orange. The Museum of Orange displays a series of artefacts found in the area, dating from prehistoric to Roman times. Amongst its most celebrated items, the Museum of Orange houses a series... Read More

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Mycenae

Mycenae is a well-preserved Ancient Greek archaeological site in the Peloponnese which formed the centre of the Mycenaean civilisation.

Mycenae is an important archaeological site in Greece which was once the city at the centre of the Mycenaean civilisation of between 1600BC and 1100BC. Believed to have been inhabited since Neolithic times, Mycenae flourished into a fortified city and was ruled at one time by the famous King Agamemnon. At... Read More

Photo by juliagrossmann (cc)

National Museum Cardiff

The National Museum Cardiff has a diverse collection ranging from art to natural history and archaeology.

The National Museum Cardiff has a diverse collection ranging from art to natural history and archaeology. The art collections at the National Museum Cardiff spans over 500 years and a range of countries. Meanwhile, history fans can also head to the Origins gallery, which chronicles the history of man in... Read More

National Museum of Denmark

The National Museum of Denmark contains an impressive range of exhibits about the country’s history and culture.

The National Museum of Denmark (Nationalmuseet) contains a range of exhibits about the country’s history and culture. There are eight main themes within the National Museum of Denmark from prehistory to present day. Going through the museum, visitors can learn about everything from the Vikings and other early Danish inhabitants... Read More

Newgrange

Newgrange is a dramatic prehistoric burial mound complex in County Meath in Ireland.

Newgrange is a dramatic prehistoric burial mound complex in County Meath in Ireland. Comprised of several elements including a passage grave, a henge and a circle of standing stones, Newgrange is thought to have been built sometime between 3300 and 2900BC. This would make it older than both Stonehenge and Egypt’s... Read More

Rouffignac Caves

The Rouffignac Caves house a myriad of Palaeolithic paintings and are part of the UNESCO listed region of the Vézère Valley.

The Rouffignac Caves (Grotte de Rouffignac) stretch for eight kilometres near Les Eyzes, southwest France and contain a huge array of Stone Age cave paintings, primarily of mammoths. Much of this historic site can be accessed via an electric train. The Rouffignac Caves form part of the UNESCO World Heritage site... Read More

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Silbury Hill

A Stone Age chalk mound with a mysterious past, Silbury Hill is the largest man-made mound in Europe.

Only 1500 meters south of the main Avebury Rings stands Silbury Hill, the largest, and perhaps the most enigmatic, of all megalithic constructions in Europe. Crisscrossing the surrounding countryside are numerous meandering lines of standing stones and mysterious underground chambers, many positioned according to astronomical alignments. Believed to date back to... Read More

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Skara Brae

Skara Brae is Northern Europe’s best preserved Neolithic village and a UNESCO World Heritage site located in the Orkney Isles.

Skara Brae is an incredibly well-preserved Neolithic village in the Orkney Isles off the coast of mainland Scotland. Characterised by sturdy stone slab structures insulated and protected by the clay and household waste which holds them together, Skara Brae is a stunning example of the high quality of Neolithic workmanship. Skara... Read More

Spanish National Museum of Archaeology

The Spanish National Museum of Archaeology displays historical artefacts from throughout the country’s history as well as from around the world.

The Spanish National Museum of Archaeology (Museo Nacional de Arqueologia) in Madrid displays historical artefacts from throughout the country’s history as well as from around the world. The periods covered by the Spanish National Archaeological Museum range from prehistory to the nineteenth century and include Ancient Roman and Greek works, Egyptian... Read More

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Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a mysterious collection of vast stone circles dating back to around 3000 BC and a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Stonehenge in Wiltshire is a world renowned, magnificent site consisting of standing (and lying) stones, some transported from South Wales. The construction of Stonehenge took place between 3000 BC and 1600 BC and is considered to be one of the most impressive structures of its time, especially considering each stone... Read More

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The Sanctuary (Avebury)

The Sanctuary near Avebury houses the remains of a Neolithic monument and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

The Sanctuary near Avebury in England is a monument believed to date back to around 3000 BC. The concrete markers which can be seen today at the Sanctuary site were once made up of first timber slabs and then stones. These were destroyed in approximately 1725 AD, their original locations... Read More

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Tumba Madzari

Tumba Madzari is a Neolithic settlement in the north-eastern region of Skopje, in Macedonia. It is most notable for the Pre-Indo-European Great Mother statuettes.

Tumba Madzari is a Neolithic settlement in the north-eastern region of Skopje, in Macedonia. It is most notable for the Pre-Indo-European Great Mother statuettes which provide the proof of existence of the Cult of the Great Mother Goddess. After several archaeological excavations on the site, a range of artefacts were discovered which... Read More

Varna Necropolis

Varna necropolis consists of merely 300 excavated burials from the 5th millennium BC and contains the world greatest amount of manufactured gold for the time.

Varna Necropolis is the site of some 300 excavated burials from the 5th millennium BC which are said to have once contained the world’s greatest amount of manufactured gold for the time. Today, many findings from Varna Necropolis – also known as the Eneolithic Necropolis – are displayed at... Read More

Yorkshire Museum

The Yorkshire Museum is a true celebration of two thousand years of history of one of the UK’s most beautiful, traditional and influential cities.

The Yorkshire Museum was opened in 1830 by the Yorkshire Philosophical Society and is a celebration of two millennia of history of one of the UK’s most beautiful, traditional and influential cities. One of the UKs first purpose-built museums, it reopened in 2010 after a £2m refurbishment project. The Yorkshire Museum... Read More