Mexican War of Independence Sites

If you’re looking to explore Mexican War of Independence sites and want to find the best places to view Mexican War of Independence history then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s an initial selection of Mexican War of Independence sites and you can find some interesting places to visit on your trips. Once you’ve explored the list of Mexican War of Independence sites and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring Mexican War of Independence sites.

Our database of historic places is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other Mexican War of Independence sites, remains or ruins, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our Explore page.
 

Mexican War of Independence: Site Index

Photo by jlrsousa (cc)

Alhondiga de Granaditas

Alhondiga de Granaditas was the site of a rebel attack against the Spanish in the Mexican War of Independence.

DID YOU KNOW?

Alhondiga de Granaditas in Guanajuato City in Mexico was originally built as a granary warehouse and marketplace between 1798 and 1809. However, at the start of the Mexican War of Independence this beautiful building became the site of a major clash between Spanish colonialists and Mexican rebels.

In 1810 the priest and leader of the revolution, Miguel Hidalgo, led a campaign to capture Guanajuato City. At that time, the Spanish began using Alhondiga de Granaditas as a fortress in which to shelter, an action which initially proved quite effective. However, Hidalgo then ordered a miner called Juan José de los Reyes Martínez, known as ‘El Pípila’ to set Alhondiga de Granaditas on fire. After strapping a slab to his back for protection from enemy fire, El Pípila did just that. The result was the massacre of those inside Alhondiga de Granaditas and doubt by some as to whether to continue with the fight for independence.

The Mexicans managed to take Guanajuato City, but by the following year the Spanish had recaptured it and exacted revenge on the rebels. Four of the movement’s main leaders, namely Hidalgo, Juan Aldama, Mariano Jimenez and Ignacio Allende were beheaded and their heads displayed on the walls of Alhondiga de Granaditas. The message was clear –rebellion would not be tolerated.

In the nineteenth century, Alhondiga de Granaditas became a prison and today houses a museum, Museo Regional La Alhóndiga de Granaditas. The museum contains colonial exhibits and those about the Mexican struggle for independence as well as some about the pre-Colombian era. It also houses numerous pieces of art.

This fascinating site features as one of our Top Ten Tourist Attractions of Mexico.

Photo by paulinaclemente (cc)

Castillo de Chapultepec

Chapultepec Castle was once the home of Emperor Maximilian of Habsburg and now houses Mexico’s National History Museum

DID YOU KNOW?

Chapultepec Castle (Castillo de Chapultepec) is an eighteenth century building in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Park now containing Mexico’s National History Museum (Museo Nacional de Historia).

Original construction of Chapultepec Castle began in 1785, but it was only completed after Mexico achieved independence and later refurbished as the home of Emperor Maximilian of Habsburg in 1864, before becoming the residence of Mexico’s presidents. Parts of Chapultepec Castle are still dedicated to their time as Emperor Maximilian’s home, however today, most of Chapultepec Castle is dedicated to the National History Museum.

Within its twelve halls, Mexico’s National History Museum charts the country’s diverse history, from the Pre-Hispanic era through to Spanish colonialism, Mexico’s revolution and its independence. Some of the National History Museum’s most significant exhibitions include the sword wielded by independence fighter José María Morelos in the Siege of Cuautla in 1812 as well as several murals depicting famous battles.

Chapultepec Castle features as one of our Top 10 Mexican Tourist Attractions.

The National Palace of Mexico

The National Palace of Mexico is an important landmark representing Mexico’s independence.

DID YOU KNOW?

The National Palace of Mexico, or Palacio Nacional, was originally constructed in 1692 on a site which has been central to Mexico’s governance since Aztec times.

It became the National Palace in 1821, following the Mexican War of Independence, and houses the bell rung by the priest and original leader of this conflict, Miguel Hidalgo.

Hidalgo rang the bell in 1810 to signal Mexico’s independence during his famous “Cry of Dolores” speech, although he would not live to see this as he was beheaded shortly thereafter.

The National Palace served as the main command point during the US-Mexican War of 1846-1848 and is currently the seat of the country’s president as well as being home to the Federal Treasury and National Archives. Visitors to the National Palace can view Diego Rivera’s murals of Mexico’s history, particularly that of Spain’s conquest of the country in 1520.