Mary Queen of Scots Historic Sites

If you're wondering ’where did Mary Queen of Scots live?’ Or you want to find our more about the places that Mary Queen of Scots spent her life then Trip Historic can help you follow in the footsteps of this iconic Scottish Queen.

Visit the places that Mary Queen of Scots called home, those that became her prison as well as other historic sites that relate to the life of  Mary.

To find out more about these Mary Queen of Scots sites, you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below. Once you’ve selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time discovering Mary Queen of Scots sites.

Our database of historic places is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other historic places relating to Mary Queen of Scots, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

Mary Queen of Scots: Site Index

Chatsworth House

Chatsworth House is an English country estate that once served as the prison of Mary Queen of Scots.

Chatsworth House in Derbyshire is an historic English country estate that has served as the home for the Dukes of Devonshire and their ancestors since the mid-16th century. The first house to be built on the Chatsworth House site was constructed in 1549 by Sir William Cavendish and his... Read More

Photo by conskeptical (cc)

Craigmillar Castle

Craigmillar Castle once played host to Mary Queen of Scots when she was recovering from an illness.

Craigmillar Castle was built from the fourteenth century and is now a pretty and well-preserved medieval ruin. The most famed aspect of Craigmillar Castle was that it played host to Mary Queen of Scots when she was recovering from an illness. It is also the namesake of a pact between... Read More

Photo by baaker2009 (cc)

Dumbarton Castle

It was at Dumbarton Castle that a young Mary Queen of Scots once sought refuge before travelling to France.

Dumbarton Castle was a medieval stronghold which served as a wartime prison, a royal shelter and a defence against both foreign and national threats. Even the site upon which Dumbarton Castle sits -Dumbarton Rock - has an illustrious past. Little survives of the medieval castle - most of it is... Read More

Photo by Bernt Rostad (cc)

Edinburgh Castle

Mary Queen of Scots gave birth to her son James - future king of England and Scotland - at Edinburgh Castle in 1566.

A royal residence, a vital stronghold and an iconic structure, Edinburgh Castle is one of the most famous castles in the world. Known by its English name since the invasion of the Angles in 638AD, the first mentions of Edinburgh Castle occurred in 600 AD during Roman Britain, when it... Read More

Photo by beltzner (cc)

Falkland Palace

Falkland Palace was the country retreat and hunting lodge of the royal Stuart dynasty and a favourite home of Mary Queen of Scots.

Falkland Palace was the Renaissance country retreat and hunting lodge of the royal Stuart dynasty for around two centuries. Begun in 1450 and completed in 1541, Falkland Palace was the work of kings James IV and James V and was very much a favourite of Mary Queen of Scots. The highlights of... Read More

Photo by Iain Simpson (cc)

Fotheringhay Castle

Fortheringhay Castle was the birthplace of Richard III and site of execution of Mary Queen of Scots

Birthplace of Richard III and site of the trial and execution of Mary Queen of Scots, this Norman motte and bailey castle is now a ruin - in fact very little is left of it today. Fortheringhay Castle is easily accessable during daylight hours, and should delight those interested in medieval... Read More

Photo by ToniaYu (cc)

Holyroodhouse Palace

Holyroodhouse Palace is the Scottish royal residence famed as having been home to Mary Queen of Scots.

Holyroodhouse Palace has a history stretching back to the twelfth century. Now the official Scottish residence of the Queen, the story of Holyroodhouse Palace is intertwined with that of the monarchy, particularly that of Mary Queen of Scots. Holyroodhouse Palace is said to have been founded as an Augustinian monastery by... Read More

Photo by arthurmoodyuk (cc)

Inchmahome Priory

Inchmahome Priory was a medieval monastery which once sheltered a young Mary Queen of Scots.

Inchmahome Priory was first founded as an Augustinian monastery in approximately 1238 under the instructions of the Earl of Menteith. Over the centuries, Inchmahome Priory’s secluded location made it an ideal refuge. Even royals saw Inchmahome Priory as a sanctuary, including King Robert Bruce. However, it is more famous for the... Read More

Photo by DaGoaty (cc)

Linlithgow Palace

Linlithgow Palace was the birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots and host to most of the Stuart kings.

Linlithgow Palace was built in the fifteenth century on a site with a history dating back thousands of years. Now a dramatic ruin, its royal connection makes it an enduring tourist attraction. It was James I who began building Linlithgow Palace in 1424. With its location between Stirling Castle and Edinburgh... Read More

Photo by kyz (cc)

Lochleven Castle

Lochleven Castle was a medieval stronghold most renowned for being the prison of Mary Queen of Scots.

Lochleven Castle was a medieval island stronghold, the dramatic ruins of which can be reached by boat. Whilst being most well known for being the prison of Mary Queen of Scots, Lochleven Castle’s role within Scottish royal history extends far further. Many royals were guests - as opposed to prisoners... Read More

Photo by access.denied (cc)

Sheffield Manor Lodge

Once a prominent Tudor country estate and one-time prison of Mary Queen of Scots, the remains of Sheffield Manor Lodge include the well-preserved Tudor Turret House.

Originally a fine Tudor country estate, the remains of Sheffield Manor Lodge are now an important visitor attraction and give a glimpse into medieval history. The site upon which the Manor Lodge was built was located within an ancient deer park, and it is likely that a far older hunting lodge... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle is an iconic royal palace which was the location of the coronation of Mary Queen of Scots in 1543.

Stirling Castle is an iconic royal palace and stronghold, seen to represent Scottish independence and a focal point for many of the most important events in Scotland’s history. Famous Events at Stirling Castle It was the site of royal deaths such as that of King Alexander I in 1124 and William... Read More

Photo by steve p2008 (cc)

Tutbury Castle

Tutbury Castle is an imposing medieval site in Staffordshire which had one very famous prisoner, Mary Queen of Scots.

Tutbury Castle is an imposing medieval site in Staffordshire which had one very famous prisoner, Mary Queen of Scots. Whilst its history is said to date back to the 11th century, most of the ruins of Tutbury Castle seen today originate from the 14th and 15th centuries, under the remit... Read More