The National Palace of Mexico

Mexico City , Mexico City , Mexico

About The National Palace of Mexico

The National Palace of Mexico, or Palacio Nacional, was originally constructed in 1692 on a site which has been central to Mexico’s governance since Aztec times.

It became the National Palace in 1821, following the Mexican War of Independence, and houses the bell rung by the priest and original leader of this conflict, Miguel Hidalgo.

Hidalgo rang the bell in 1810 to signal Mexico’s independence during his famous “Cry of Dolores” speech, although he would not live to see this as he was beheaded shortly thereafter.

The National Palace served as the main command point during the US-Mexican War of 1846-1848 and is currently the seat of the country’s president as well as being home to the Federal Treasury and National Archives. Visitors to the National Palace can view Diego Rivera’s murals of Mexico’s history, particularly that of Spain’s conquest of the country in 1520.

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