The Caesarea Aqueduct

Jisr az-Zarqa, Haifa District, Israel

About The Caesarea Aqueduct

The Caesarea Aqueduct is the picturesque, well-preserved ruin of the ancient Roman aqueduct which served the city of Caesarea.

Mostly constructed during the reign of King Herod the Great, the majority of the great public buildings, infrastructure and monuments of Caesarea were built from around 22 BC onwards.

The city became a thriving commercial hub which hosted sporting events and which flourished further under the Byzantines. However, the city had no reliable fresh water supply at the time of construction and the growing population demanded greater supplies of water to furnish the various public and private demands of a Roman city. The aqueduct was therefore built to provide this supply and was further expanded as the city grew in the following centuries.

In later years Caesarea's importance diminished and, though the aqueduct fell in to disuse, it has remained in a relatively good state of preservation to this day.

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