About Devin Castle

Devin Castle (Devínsky hrad) occupies a strategically important spot in Slovakia. It is located on a cliff above the point where the Morava River empties into the Danube, making it close to Bratislava and Hainburg, Austria.

In late antiquity the site was part of the Limes Romanus or limits or borders of the Roman Empire. In the 9th century the prince Rastislav built a fort on the site in service of the kingdom of Great Moravia. The Upper Castle dates from the 13th century, with palace buildings following in the 15th to 17th centuries. Napoleon's troops destroyed much of the castle in 1809.

Devin Castle became a National Heritage Site in 1961. Because Austria was just across the river, the site was heavily guarded to prevent citizens from escaping into the free west before the fall of Communism in 1989. The Maiden Tower, Devin Castle’s most famous sight, was depicted on the Slovak 50 halier coin before the adoption of the euro in 2009.

Besides the Upper Castle and remains of the palaces, the grounds also feature the castle's well, into which visitors can pour a bucket of water to hear its depth, and the ruins of a 4th-century church.

Devin Castle is now part of the Bratislava City Museum. There is an archaeological exhibit featuring artifacts found in the castle area and the history of excavation of the site. Unfortunately, due to an unstable foundation, the Upper Castle has been closed since 2008 for reconstruction. The rest of the castle area is still open to visitors.

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