US Historical Sites

If you’re looking to explore Historic Sites in United States and the surrounding area then you can explore our interactive map of US historical sites above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s a fantastic selection of Historic Sites in United States and you can plan some great things to see on your trips by browsing our selection. Once you’ve explored the historical sites of the usa you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan out your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook.

Our database of US historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other Historic Sites in United States, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.


Top US Destinations: Historic Sites in Washington DC | Historic Sites in New York City | Historic Sites in Boston | Historic Sites in Philadelphia

Historical sites in United States: Regional Index

United States: Site Index

African American Museum - Philadelphia

The African American Museum in Philadelphia explores African American history and heritage.

The African American Museum in Philadelphia explores the history and heritage of African Americans, from culture, literature and art to politics. The main collections at the African American Museum in Philadelphia relate to the history of Philadelphian African Americans in the twentieth century, from exhibits about the city’s chapter of... Read More

Photo by Dennis from Atlanta (cc)

Alcatraz Island

One of the most infamous US historical sites Alcatraz Island in San Francisco was a military base turned federal prison, which housed many of the USA’s most notorious criminals.

Alcatraz Island was the site of a notoriously harsh prison based off the coast of San Francisco, California, this isolated position earning it the name of “The Rock”. However, prior to becoming a prison, Alcatraz Island had a long history as a military base. Initially discovered by a Spanish explorer in... Read More

Photo by Richard Elzey (cc)

Andersonville Prison

Andersonville Prison in Georgia is a National Historic Site dedicated to all American prisoners of war.

Andersonville Prison, also known as Camp Sumter, in Georgia was a military prison established by the Confederates in February 1864, during the American Civil War. In fact, Andersonville was one of the largest of such prisons and, by April 1865, had held over 45,000 Union prisoners of war or ‘POW’s’. Over... Read More

Photo by dulasfloyd (cc)

Andrew Johnson National Historic Site

The Andrew Johnson National Historic Site commemorates the life of the seventeenth president of America.

President Andrew Johnson’s house, now operating as the Andrew Johnson National Historic Site, is a museum about the seventeenth president of the United States of America. The Andrew Johnson National Historic Site is set in Andrew Johnson’s home of 24 years. Andrew Johnson was a southerner and a Democrat, who worked... Read More

Photo by Alaskan Dude (cc)

Antietam Battlefield

A sobering historical location, Antietam Battlefield was the scene of the culmination of the Maryland campaign and single bloodiest day’s battle in American History.

Antietam Battlefield was where, on 17 September 1862, General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia met Major General George B. McClellan and the Army of the Potomac in what became the most brutal battle of the American Civil War. In fact, the Battle of Antietam remains the... Read More

Photo by rharrison (cc)

Appomattox County Court

Among the most significant of US historical sites, Appomattox was the village where General Robert E. Lee surrendered in 1865, ending the American Civil War.

It was in Appomattox, a village in Virginia, that General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant on 9 April 1865, marking the end of the American Civil War. The meeting took place at the home of Wilmer and Virginia McLean and lasted approximately an hour and... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Arkansas State University Museum

Arkansas State University Museum offers a range of exhibits looking at the natural history and cultural heritage of Northeast Arkansas.

Arkansas State University Museum, located on the Arkansas University campus, offers a range of exhibits and collections looking at the natural history and cultural heritage of Northeast Arkansas. Established in 1933, the museum examines the history of the state, stretching from pre-historic times to early European settlement and beyond. Permanent exhibits... Read More

Photo by pastorbuhro (cc)

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia is an iconic burial site and a national monument.

Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia is both a military burial site and an iconic monument to fallen soldiers. Initially, the site of Arlington Cemetery began as a house – Arlington House – built in memory of President George Washington. The house, which still stands today, then became the property of... Read More

Photo by Chris_Short (cc)

Averasboro Battlefield

The Battle of Averasborough was part of the Carolinas Campaign during the American Civil War.

Averasboro Battlefield  was the site of The Battle of Averasborough, part of the Carolinas Campaign during the American Civil War. The Battle of Averasborough took place on 15 and 16 March 1865. Part of the Carolinas Campaign of the American Civil War, the Battle of Averasborough was fought between the Unionist... Read More

Photo by Ken Lund (cc)

Aztec Ruins National Monument

Aztec Ruins National Monument is actually the home of an impressive set of ancestral Puebloan ruins. A lesser-known but important US historic site.

Aztec Ruins National Monument is actually the home of an impressive set of ancestral Puebloan ruins rather than anything built by the Aztecs. The name Aztec Ruins National Monument is actually a misnomer, deriving from a 19th century misconception about the origins of the site. Begun in the twelfth... Read More

Bacon’s Castle

Built in 1665, remains British North America's oldest, extent brick dwelling and finest example of Jacobean architecture.

Located in Surry, Virginia, Bacon’s Castle was built in 1665, the home of plantation owner Arthur Allen. Yet the name Bacon’s Castle refers not to its original master but to the anti-colonial uprising known as Bacon's Rebellion which banished Allen’s son and heir from the house in 1676. Today, Bacon’s Castle... Read More

Battle of Leyte Gulf Memorial

The Battle of Leyte Gulf Memorial commemorates the biggest historic naval battle of World War II.

The Battle of Leyte Gulf Memorial commemorates what is generally known as the biggest historic naval battle of World War II. Fought in the seas around the Philippines in October 1944 between US and Japanese fleets, as well as by air, the Battle of Leyte Gulf is famed not just for... Read More

Photo by freddthompson (cc)

Bay of Pigs Museum

The Bay of Pigs Museum in Miami relates to the failed 1961 attempt to overthrow Fidel Castro.

The Bay of Pigs Museum in Miami, Florida is dedicated to the 2506 Brigade, the group which undertook the failed attempt by to overthrow Cuban leader Fidel Castro. The Bay of Pigs invasion was undertaken by Cuban exiles supported by the CIA and US government under President John F Kennedy. In... Read More

Photo by M Glasgow (cc)

Bethel Baptist Church

Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham Alabama was the headquarters of local civil rights activists and played a crucial role in the US Civil Rights movement. It was attacked on three separate occasions by extremists.

The site of Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham Alabama played a crucial role in the fledgling American Civil Rights movement. From 1956 until 1961 Bethel Baptist Church was the headquarters of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights which strove to ensure equal rights through non-violent means and fought... Read More

Photo by Pilot MKN (cc)

Brice’s Crossroads Battlefield

One of many civil war historic sites, Brice’s Crossroads Battlefield was the site of a Confederate victory on 10 June 1864.

On 10 June 1864, Brice's Crossroads Battlefield in Mississippi was the site of a clash between 4,787 Confederate troops led by Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest and 8,100 Union soldiers commanded by Brigadier General Samuel D. Sturgis. By this time, the Union had won several important battles such as in Gettysburg... Read More

Photo by Allie_Caulfield (cc)

Bunker Hill Monument

AN important US historic site, The Bunker Hill Monument commemorates the first major battle of the American Revolution in 1775.

The Bunker Hill Monument is a memorial of the Battle of Bunker Hill, which took place on 17 June 1775 between the British army and the militias of Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island early in the American Revolution. The British army was far more well equipped and well trained... Read More

California African American Museum

The California African American Museum is dedicated to African American history and culture.

The California African American Museum (CAAM) is dedicated to the history and culture of African Americans, particularly the African American community in California. Combining exhibits of art, such as its collection of masks from around West Africa, with historic artefacts, the California African American Museum aims to tell the story... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Castillo de San Marcos

The Castillo de San Marcos is a 17th century fortification and the oldest of its type in the continental United States.

The Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine, Florida, is the oldest stone fort in the continental United States. Originally constructed by the Spanish in the late 17th century, the stone Castillo de San Marcos replaced a previous wooden fortification. The need for a stone fort became apparent after the English... Read More

Photo by jimbowen0306 (cc)

Chancellorsville Battlefield

Chancellorsville Battlefield was the site of Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s “greatest victory” in 1863 during the American Civil War.

Chancellorsville Battlefield in Virginia was the site of a major Confederate victory during the American Civil War and part of the wider Chancellorsville Campaign, an attempt by the Unionists to capture the Confederate capital of Richmond. Fought between 30 April and 6 May 1863, the Battle of Chancellorsville saw the Confederate... Read More

Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center

The Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center chronicles the history of this area including its famous land run.

The Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center chronicles the history of the area of land known as the Cherokee Strip or the Cherokee Outlet. This area of land was given to the Cherokee nation in the nineteenth century and became home to Native American tribes before it was sold back... Read More

Photo by TJJohn12 (cc)

Chickamauga Battlefield

The Chickamauga Battlefield was the scene of the Confederates’ last major victory in the American Civil War.

Chickamauga Battlefield forms part of the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park and is a major landmark in US history. In the fall of 1863, General William S. Rosecrans' Union army fought General Braxton Bragg's Confederates for control of Chattanooga, a key rail centre and what was considered the gateway to... Read More

Photo by Library of Congress (cc)

Cliveden House

Cliveden House is an eighteenth century historic home in Philadelphia and the site of a Revolutionary War battle.

Cliveden House is an eighteenth century historic home in Northwest Philadelphia’s Germantown neighbourhood. Built from 1763 to 1767, Cliveden House was intended as the summer home of Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Chew and his family. In fact, it would go on to fulfil this role for seven generations of Chews,... Read More

Photo by JoeDuck (cc)

Cold Harbor

One of many historical site in the US relating to the American Civil War, Cold Harbor was the site of one of General Robert E. Lee’s final victories in the conflict.

The Battle of Cold Harbor was part of the overland campaign of 1864 during the American Civil War. It was here in Cold Harbor that, between 31 May and 12 June 1864, the Army of the Potomac led by Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant battled General Robert E. Lee and the... Read More

Photo by cliff1066™ (cc)

College Park Aviation Museum

College Park Aviation Museum in Maryland is a museum which charts America’s history of aviation.

In addition to being the longest operating airport in the world and the site where Wilbur Wright – one of the Wright brothers – trained the first aviators, College Park Aviation Museum in Maryland is now a museum which explores the history of aviation, including the World War One era.... Read More

Photo by boboroshi (cc)

Colonial National Park

English Colonial America started and ended in the area now known as Colonial National Park.

Colonial National Park encompasses the areas in which the English established their first permanent American colony in 1607 and the battlefield on which they surrendered to George Washington’s army in 1781, thus ending their rule. Incorporating Historic Jamestowne and Yorktown Battlefield, together with the Cape Henry Memorial commemorating the location of... Read More

Photo by HBarrison (cc)

Colonial Williamsburg

Colonial Williamsburg is the recreation of the 18th century capital of Virginia.

Colonial Williamsburg is a historic site in Virginia made up of an entire town restored to its colonial state. From homes to public buildings and shops, Colonial Williamsburg takes visitors back to the time when Williamsburg was the capital of Virginia – between 1699 and 1780. Later, during the American War... Read More

Photo by Brokentaco (cc)

Colorado Springs Pioneer Museum

The Colorado Springs Pioneer Museum focuses on the history of the Pikes Peak region.

The Colorado Springs Pioneer Museum focuses on the history of the Pikes Peak region and, in particular, that of the city of Colorado Springs. From Native American history to the founding of Colorado Springs and its mining history, the Colorado Springs Pioneer Museum has exhibits on a range of issues.... Read More

Photo by Kurt Magoon (cc)

Congress Hall

Ranked among the most important of US historical sites, Congress Hall was the seat of the USA’s Congress between 1790 and 1800.

Congress Hall was originally built as Philadelphia’s County Court House, but when Philadelphia became the temporary capital of the US in 1790, it was transformed into the seat of the country’s Congress. Congress Hall served as Congress’ seat from 6 December 1790 to 14 May 1800, when Congress relocated to Washington... Read More

Photo by MGSwarbs (cc)

Daniel Boone Homestead

The Daniel Boone Homestead is an historic reserve containing a number of sites relating to the early life of legendary American frontiersman Daniel Boone.

The Daniel Boone Homestead is the birthplace of famous American pioneer Daniel Boone. A legendary frontiersman, Boone was one of the most famous explorers of his lifetime and achieved iconic status within US folklore. Located near Reading, Pennsylvania, the Daniel Boone Homestead contains a number of historic buildings... Read More

Photo by MadMarlin (cc)

Dealey Plaza

Dealey Plaza in Texas was the site of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. It is clearly one of the most tragic of all US historic locations.

Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas was the site where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated at 12:30pm (CST) on 22 November 1963. Kennedy was the thirty-fifth President of the United States of America and served during the Cold War, his premiership encompassing events such as the Invasion of the Bay... Read More

Photo by Zol87 (cc)

DuSable Museum of African American History

The DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago looks at the history of Africans and Americans of African descent.

The DuSable Museum of African American History is a museum in Chicago which explores the history and culture of African Americans. Its exhibits include several murals, paintings and sculptures representing prominent African Americans and an exhibit looking at the history of African Americans in the armed forces. The DuSable Museum... Read More

Photo by tiseb (cc)

Ellis Island

An iconic American historic site, Ellis Island is a famous island off New York City which served as an immigration centre from 1892 to 1954.

Ellis Island was the entry point into the United States of America for over twelve million immigrants between 1892 and 1954. Prior to this, Ellis Island had been owned by the state of New York and was purchased by the federal government in 1808, first for use as a fortification and,... Read More

Photo by Rob Shenk (cc)

Ellwood Plantation

The Ellwood Plantation is the site of General Stonewall Jackson’s arm which was buried there after he was wounded in the Battle of Chancellorsville.

The Ellwood Plantation (Ellwood Cemetery) is the site of General Stonewall Jackson's arm, which was buried there after he was wounded in the Battle of Chancellorsville. After being accidentally shot in darkness by fellow Confederates, Jackson's doctor Hunter Macguire amputated his left arm. It was placed in a grave... Read More

Photo by Ken Lund (cc)

Emerald Mound

The Emerald Mound site is a Mississippian culture period ancient mound built between 1250 and 1600AD and used as a ceremonial site and political center. One of many native American historic sites.

The Emerald Mound is one of a number of ancient mound sites built by the indigenous peoples of the Americas. Several similar sites have been found within Mississippi and in other areas of the United States. One of the largest mounds in the US, the Emerald Mound site was likely constructed... Read More

Photo by Tony the Misfit (cc)

Faneuil Hall

Faneuil Hall, known as the Cradle of Liberty, was the scene of protests leading up to the American War of Independence.

Faneuil Hall in Boston was constructed in 1742 by wealthy merchant, Peter Faneuil and although it burnt down in 1761, was rebuilt the next year. Faneuil intended the brick building to be a centre of commerce, a function which it still fulfils today. However, it was during the eighteenth century that... Read More

Photo by krispdk (cc)

Federal Hall

Federal Hall was the site of George Washington’s inauguration as president and the ratification of the Bill of Rights and as such ranks among the most important of all US historical sites.

Federal Hall was the site of George Washington’s inauguration as first president of the United States, where the Bill of Right was ratified and the place where newspaper publisher John Peter Zenger was tried and acquitted of libel for exposing government corruption, thus affirming the notion of freedom of the... Read More

Photo by ttarasiuk (cc)

Ford Theatre

Ford Theatre was the site where President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated in 1865.

It was in Ford Theatre on the night of 14 April 1865 that well-known actor John Wilkes Booth shot President Abraham Lincoln. A Confederate sympathiser and spy, Booth had originally planned to kidnap Lincoln, but instead shot the President in the back of the head as he watched Ford Theatre’s production... Read More

Photo by Ken Lund (cc)

Fort Caroline

Fort Caroline was a short-lived sixteenth century French colony in Jacksonville, Florida.

Fort Caroline was a colony established by the French in the sixteenth century. Eager to gain a foothold in America and obtain a share of the wealth already attained by Spain, this was France’s first attempt to create such a settlement. Permanent settlement in Fort Caroline began in 1546, expedited by... Read More

Photo by Sir Mildred Pierce (cc)

Fort Clinch

Fort Clinch in Florida is a nineteenth century Third System fort.

Fort Clinch on Amelia Island in Florida is a fort built in 1847 as part of the Third System defence plan. The Third System was a plan instigated by the US government following the War of 1812 to improve the country’s coastal defences and, with its pentagonal shape and brick... Read More

Photo by countryboy1949 (cc)

Fort Donelson Battlefield

Fort Donelson Battlefield was the scene of a major Union victory in the American Civil War.

Fort Donelson Battlefield was the site of a fierce and pivotal battle fought from 11 to 16 February 1862 as part of the American Civil War. The two parties involved were the Unionists commanded by the then Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant and the Confederates, led by Brigadier General John... Read More

Photo by Adam_d_ (cc)

Fort Frederica

Fort Frederica was an 18th century British fortification.

Fort Frederica is a National Monument in the state of Georgia, USA which was originally established by the British General James Oglethorpe in 1736 to fortify a British settlement. It was named for the Prince of Wales, Frederick Louis. At that time, what is now the state of Georgia – the... Read More

Photo by expertinfantry (cc)

Fort Gaines

Fort Gaines was a fortification used in the American Civil War.

Fort Gaines is a nineteenth century fortification on Dauphin Island, Alabama. The island itself has a rich history, having been a French, British and Spanish colony and once having been called “Massacre Island” due to the large number of remains found there by a sixteenth century French explorer. It came under... Read More

Fort Hamilton

Fort Hamilton is a Third System Fort, a US military base and home to the Harbor Defense Museum.

Fort Hamilton is a US military base in New York built between 1825 and 1831 as part of the city’s Third System defences. The Third System forts were coastal defences built in the US following the War of 1812. Even before its construction, the site on which Fort Hamilton was built... Read More

Fort Macon

Fort Macon is a nineteenth century fort which was captured by the Union in 1862 during the American Civil War.

Fort Macon in Carteret County, North Carolina was one of a series of forts originally built to protect the state’s main deep ocean port, known as the Beaufort Inlet. The perceived threat was from countries such as Spain and Britain, who had both invaded the port in the eighteenth century. Whilst... Read More

Photo by sneakerdog (cc)

Fort McHenry

Fort McHenry was the site of a siege during the War of 1812 and the inspiration for the American National Anthem.

Fort McHenry in Baltimore was originally constructed as a defensive structure between 1799 and 1802. It was named after James McHenry, the Secretary of War from 1796 to 1800. However it was in the War of 1812 that this five pointed star shaped brick building served its most famous role. The... Read More

Photo by hdroberts (cc)

Fort Pickens

Fort Pickens is an historic US military fort in Pensacola, Florida, named after Revolutionary War hero Andrew Pickens. It forms part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore, a site overseen by the National Park Service.

Fort Pickens is an historic US military fort in Pensacola, Florida, named after Revolutionary War hero Andrew Pickens. Begun in 1829, Fort Pickens was a Third System Fort intended to protect Pensacola Harbor, a role which it fulfilled together with Fort Barrancas and Fort McRee as well as the Navy... Read More

Photo by Ken Lund (cc)

Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski is a nineteenth century fortification and the site of an important military test during the American Civil War.

Fort Pulaski in Georgia is a nineteenth century hexagonal brick fortification built between 1829 and 1847 as part of the Third System plan, although it would play a significant role in undermining this plan. The Third System was a defence system established following the War of 1812 to protect America’s... Read More

Photo by sarahstierch (cc)

Fort Raleigh

Fort Raleigh in North Carolina was the site of the famous English “lost colony” of Roanoke.

Fort Raleigh is a National Historic Park located on Roanoke Island in North Carolina, the site of an English colony which was famously “lost”. The "Lost" Colony First established between 1584 and 1590, the English colony was a first attempt by the English to colonise the “New World”, a campaign spearheaded by... Read More

Photo by fw_gadget (cc)

Fort Sumter

Fort Sumter was the site where the American Civil War officially began on 12 April 1861.

Fort Sumter in South Carolina was originally built in the nineteenth century as part of the “Third System” plan to defend the coasts of America following the War of 1812 against the British. In fact, it would go on to become the site of the ignition of the American Civil... Read More

Photo by Mercedea (cc)

Fort Taylor

Fort Taylor in Key West, Florida is a nineteenth century Third System fortification.

Fort Taylor in Key West, Florida was originally constructed following the War of 1812, in a plan known as the Third System in order to defend America’s coasts. Its construction began in 1845 and was completed in 1866, although further changes were made to Fort Taylor during the Spanish-American Wars. Its... Read More

Photo by dsearls (cc)

Fort Warren

Fort Warren on George’s Island in Boston was a fortification built during the American Civil War.

Fort Warren on George’s Island in Boston was built by the Union during the American Civil War as a defensive structure. It was one of the ‘Third System’ plan forts intended to defend the seacoast. Fort Warren is an impressive granite building which was completed in 1861. Unfortunately, by this time,... Read More

Fortress Rosecrans

Fortress Rosecrans was built by Unionist solders in 1863 following the Battle of Stones River.

Fortress Rosecrans was a fortified structure built by the Army of the Cumberland following the Battle of Stones River in 1863. It was named after General William S. Rosecrans, who led the men during this battle. Fortress Rosecrans went on to become a vital base through which the Union army... Read More

Photo by luisvilla (cc)

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern is a museum of colonial, revolutionary and early Republic US history.

Fraunces Tavern is famous for being the site where (then General) George Washington delivered a farewell speech to the Continental Army after the British had left New York in the American Revolution. Built as the home of an affluent merchant in 1719, Frances Tavern was turned into a working tavern in... Read More

Photo by Rob Shenk (cc)

Fredericksburg Battlefield

Fredericksburg Battlefield is an important site of the American Civil War, where the Confederates defeated the Unionists in a fierce battle in 1862.

Fredericksburg Battlefield in Virginia was the site of the Battle of Fredericksburg, a major clash between the Unionists led by General Ambrose E. Burnside and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia led by General Robert E. Lee during the American Civil War. It took place between 11 and 15 December... Read More

Photo by shinya (cc)

General Grant National Memorial

The General Grant National Memorial in New York is the tomb of Ulysses S. Grant.

The General Grant National Memorial, more commonly known as Grant’s Tomb, in New York is the final resting place of Ulysses S. Grant and his wife, Julia Dent Grant. Ulysses S. Grant was the eighteenth President of the United States, first elected in 1868 and again in 1872. A fierce military... Read More

Photo by The Consortium (cc)

Getty Villa

The Getty Villa is a museum dedicated to the ancient world.

The Getty Villa is a museum of Ancient Greek, Roman and Etruscan artefacts and works of art. Located in Pacific Palisades, California, it displays a collection of antiquities from each of these periods in a thematic exploration of ancient life, culture, religion and even war. The Getty Villa is itself... Read More

Photo by fauxto_digit (cc)

Gettysburg Battlefield

Scene of the Battle of Gettysburg, one of the fiercest and most important battles in the American Civil War.

Gettysburg National Military Park in the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania is brimming with approximately 1,328 monuments, markers and memorials relating to the American Civil War. In fact, Gettysburg was just a small town until the summer of 1863, when it became the scene of one of the bloodiest battles in the... Read More

Photo by Directory of Boston (cc)

Granary Burial Ground

Granary Burial Ground is a graveyard founded in the 17th century and where many famous Americans are buried.

Granary Burial Ground is a graveyard in Boston founded in 1660 and is the final resting place of many important figures from the American Revolution. While Granary Burial Ground contains around 2,345 tombs and graves, the actual number of people buried here is estimated to be approximately 5,000, due to the... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum

As well as being the one-time home of Ernest Hemingway, this was the studio where the author worked on many of his famed tomes, among them A Farewell to Arms. Now known as The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center, it is restored and open to the public.

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center was both a home and studio to renowned author Ernest Hemingway. It was from 1927 to 1940, during his marriage to Pauline Pfeiffer, that Hemingway spent much time here at his second wife’s family home. In fact, the barn of the home was converted... Read More

Photo by sarahstierch (cc)

Historic Jamestowne

Historic Jamestowne was the location of the first successful English colony in America in 1607. One of the most historically significant US historical sites.

It was in Historic Jamestowne in 1607 that the English established their first successful colony in America. Previous attempts, notably that of Roanoke in 1587, had been made, but the colony the English formed in Historic Jamestowne was the root of what was to eventually become America. Due to its strategic... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Historic St Mary’s City

The historic St Mary's City in Maryland was once a thriving colonial capital before religious dissention saw it slowly decline. Today, a living history recreation and museum tell the story of these early settlers.

The historic St Mary's City in Maryland is the site of the fourth oldest permanent British settlement in Colonial North America and birthplace of religious tolerance in the US. Founded in 1634 by Leonard Calvert, St. Mary's City quickly became a prosperous tobacco colony and capital of Maryland. It was here... Read More

Photo by GOC53 (cc)

Hovenweep National Monument

Hovenweep National Monument is a Native American historic site featuring five villages dating back to the Puebloan-era.

Hovenweep National Monument is a Native American historic site featuring five villages dating back to the Puebloan-era. The ancestral Pueblo people inhabited the area of Hovenweep National Monument as early as 10,000 years ago. Proper settlement began in circa 900AD, but the main sites found there today were built... Read More

Photo by gfoster67 (cc)

Hyde Hall

Hyde Hall is a restored neoclassical nineteenth century house in New York and a museum of its own past.

Hyde Hall is a restored neoclassical nineteenth century house in New York and a museum of its own past. Built by an Englishman named George Clarke (1768-1835), Hyde Hall went on to become the home of several generations of the Clarke family before becoming state property. Today, this historic home... Read More

Photo by techfun (cc)

Independence Hall - Philadelphia

Independence Hall is the site where the The Declaration of Independence (1776) and the Constitution of the United States (1787) were both signed and is among the most important historical sites in America.

Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is one of the most important landmarks in US history, being the site where the nation declared independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain on 4 July 1776 by signing the Declaration of Independence. Completed in 1753, Independence Hall served as Philadelphia’s State House and the... Read More

Photo by lindseywb (cc)

Independence National Historical Park

Independence Hall is the site where the The Declaration of Independence (1776) and the Constitution of the United States (1787) were both signed.

Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is home to a plethora of significant national landmarks in the US. From Independence Hall which was the site where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed and Congress Hall, seat of Congress from 1790 to 1800, to the home of Benjamin Franklin,... Read More

Photo by Rob Shenk (cc)

Jackson Shrine

Guinea Station, the lone white building where General Thomas ’Stonewall’ Jackson died.

After being wounded at the Battle of Chancellorsville, General Stonewall Jackson was taken to the Chandler Plantation in Virginia and placed in an outbuilding. His arm was amputated and he developed pneumonia. After his wife and baby arrived, he passed away on a Sunday afternoon in one of... Read More

Photo by Smart Destinations (cc)

Japanese American National Museum

The Japanese American National Museum is a museum of the history, culture and heritage of Japanese Americans.

The Japanese American National Museum is a museum of the history, culture and heritage of Japanese Americans. Whilst it has several temporary and travelling exhibits, the main exhibit at the Japanese American National Museum is called "Common Ground". This tells the story of 130 years of the history,... Read More

Photo by Kevin Burkett (cc)

Jefferson Memorial

Thomas Jefferson Memorial is a Roman style memorial structure in honour of one of America’s Founding Fathers.

The Thomas Jefferson Memorial in Washington DC’s West Potomac Park was built in 1939 to honour President Thomas Jefferson, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States of America and its third president. With its white facade, imposing columns and circular silhouette crowned by a dome, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial... Read More

Photo by roy.luck (cc)

Klondike Gold Rush Museum

The Klondike Gold Rush Museum explores the history of Seattle as it relates to this 19th century gold rush.

The Klondike Gold Rush Museum explores the history of Seattle as it relates to this 19th century gold rush. In the late 1890’s - a time of great economic depression - gold was discovered in the Yukon gold fields, leading people from all over to converge on the area... Read More

Photo by journeyguy (cc)

Lakeport Plantation

The Lakeport Plantation in Arkansas is a 19th century historic house which has recently been restored and opened to visitors.

The Lakeport Plantation in Arkansas is an Antebellum-style historic house which has recently been restored and opened to visitors. Originally built by Lycurgus and Lydia Johnson in 1859, the house was the heart of the larger plantation. Built in the style known as Antebellum (meaning "pre war") the architecture is characterised... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Lincoln Memorial

The Lincoln Memorial is a Greek temple style monument honouring the 16th President of the United States of America, Abraham Lincoln.

The Lincoln Memorial is a Greek style monument in Washington DC’s West Potomac Park. The Lincoln Memorial was built to honour President Abraham Lincoln, who was the sixteenth President of the United States of America, serving during the American Civil War, a fact that is commemorated above the giant statue of... Read More

Photo by ttarasiuk (cc)

Lincoln Tomb

Lincoln Tomb is the burial place of President Abraham Lincoln.

Lincoln Tomb in Springfield, Illinois, is the final resting place of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States of America. Abraham Lincoln, born 12 April 1809, was the country’s first Republican president and led the Union during the American Civil War. His Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 resulted in the... Read More

Photo by SeattleRay (cc)

Little Bighorn Battlefield

Little Bighorn Battlefield was the site of “Custer’s Last Stand” in June 1876 and is among the most infamous US historical sites.

Little Bighorn Battlefield in Montana played an important role in the Great Sioux War, a conflict between the Lakota and Northern Cheyenne Native Americans and the US government and which was part of an era known as the American-Indian Wars. The Lakota-Northern Cheyenne people had previously been ordered to sign the... Read More

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Lookout Mountain Battlefield

Lookout Mountain Battlefield was the scene of a pivotal battle in the Chattanooga campaign in the American Civil War.

Lookout Mountain Battlefield is the site where General Ulysses S. Grant led the Union Army to victory over the Confederate forces of General Braxton Bragg in what some know as the “Battle in the Clouds”. This battle formed part of the campaign to control nearby Chattanooga, considered to be the... Read More

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Lower East Side Tenement Museum

The Lower East Side Tenement Museum tells the story of the building at 97 Orchard Street and the thousands of immigrants who lived there.

The Lower East Side Tenement Museum in New York tells the story of the building at 97 Orchard Street and the over 7,000 immigrants who lived there in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Various themed tours are offered, allowing visitors to discover the experiences of the working class individuals and families... Read More

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Martin Luther King Jr National Site

The Martin Luther King Jr National Site explores the life of the leader of the African-American civil rights movement.

The Martin Luther King Jr National Site in Atlanta, Georgia is dedicated to commemorating the life of the leader of the African-American civil rights movement and chronicling his campaign for racial equality. Born on 15 January 1929, Martin Luther King Jr was a Baptist minister who came to lead a non-violent... Read More

Photo by Ken Lund (cc)

Mesa Verde National Park

Mesa Verde National Park is an incredibly well preserved and stunning collection of archaeological sites of the Native American Pueblo people dating back to 600 AD.

Mesa Verde National Park or “green table” national park is a breathtaking Native American site dotted with over 4,000 archaeological treasures, including 600 exceptionally well preserved cliff dwellings dating back to 600 AD. Mesa Verde National Park was once the home of the Pueblos, a Native American people who lived there... Read More

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Minute Man National Historical Park

Minute Man National Historical Park is the home of the first battle of the American Revolution.

Minute Man National Historical Park in Massachusetts, USA commemorates the start of the American Revolution. The American Revolution began as a protest against the treatment of the Americans as British subjects and turned into an eight year war for American independence. Minute Man National Park includes the Battle Road Trail, the... Read More

Minuteman Missile Silo

The Minuteman Missile Silo complex is a Cold War missile site containing a control center and missile launch site.

The Minuteman Missile Silo is a US National Historic Site which contains a Cold War missile launch site and control center. Visitors can tour both the control center and missile site, and can see the original living quarters and underground control facilities that would have been used by the... Read More

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Montezuma Castle

Montezuma Castle is a 12th century cliff dwelling in Arizona.

Montezuma Castle in Arizona, USA is a cliff dwelling built by the Sinagua Indians in around 1100AD and occupied until approximately 1425AD. Occupying an area of around 4,000 square feet, Montezuma Castle is an eminently impressive five storey limestone and mud structure demonstrating the ingenuity of the Sinagua people. Unfortunately, the public... Read More

Monticello

Monticello was the creation and long-time home of Thomas Jefferson.

Monticello is an historic home which was the creation and long-time home of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), the third president of the US and main author of its Declaration of Independence. Under Jefferson, Monticello’s 5,000 acres of land was run as a plantation. While the first "version" of Monticello was built... Read More

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Mount Rushmore

Mount Rushmore in South Dakota is an iconic monument to four of the Presidents of the United States of America.

Mount Rushmore is a granite mountain in Keystone, South Dakota carved with the heads of four of the Presidents of the USA. Begun in 1927, the work to create Mount Rushmore was carried out by 400 sculptors. It was intended that each figure be shown from the waist upwards, but... Read More

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Museum of the Confederacy

The Museum of the Confederacy chronicles the history of the seceded states under the Confederate government.

The Museum of the Confederacy chronicles the history of the seceded states under the Confederate government and tells the story of the Confederate army during the Civil War. From photographs and manuscripts to items belonging to Robert E. Lee and "Stonewall" Jackson and other artefacts, the Museum of the... Read More

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Natchez, Mississippi

Natchez in Mississippi contains a number of historic sites and places of note including a native Indian village and historic houses and churches.

Natchez is an historic town in Mississippi which contains a number of interesting historic sites and locations. Sites to visit include a Natchez Indian village, Jefferson College and the Natchez Museum of African American Heritage. Another site to visit in the surrounding area is the Emerald Mound. Natchez also boasts... Read More

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National Civil Rights Museum

The site where the father of the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King Jr, was gunned down.

The National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel is the sight of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. It has in the last several years been turned into the National Civil Right Museum. Across the street from the motel is the building and room in which James Earl... Read More

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National Constitution Center

The National Constitution Center is a museum dedicated to the history, development and modern meaning of the US Constitution.

The National Constitution Center is a museum dedicated to the history, development and modern meaning of the US Constitution. Located in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center tells the story of this historic document, placing it into context including exploring important events in the nation’s past. From traditional exhibits to... Read More

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National Mall and Memorial Parks

National Mall and Memorial Parks house many of the most iconic historical sites in the United States of America.

National Mall and Memorial Parks are run by the National Parks Service and are home to many of the US’s most famous historical landmarks including over eighty historic structures. Numbered among these are the D.C. War Memorial, the National World War II Memorial, the Korean War Veterans Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans... Read More

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National Museum of American History

The National Museum of American History offers a diverse exploration of the nation’s history.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History offers a diverse exploration of the nation’s history, its collections ranging from public lives, to major national events and cultural elements such as areas of advertising and the cinema. With over three million artifacts, the National Museum of American History covers everything from popular... Read More

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National Museum of American Jewish Military History

The National Museum of American Jewish Military History is dedicated to exploring the roles of Jewish Americans in US military history.

The National Museum of American Jewish Military History is dedicated to exploring the roles of Jewish Americans in US military history. This includes their contributions in the armed forces and in the fight against prejudice, particularly anti-Semitism. Amongst the galleries within the National Museum of American Jewish Military History is... Read More

National Museum of the American Indian - New York

The National Museum of the American Indian is dedicated to exploring the history and culture of Native Americans.

The National Museum of the American Indian is dedicated to exploring the history and culture of Native Americans. As part of the Smithsonian Institution, the National Museum of the American Indian has around a million artifacts spanning various periods of history from the Paleo-Indian to the present and relating to many... Read More

National Museum of the American Indian - Washington

The National Museum of the American Indian explores the history and culture of Native Americans.

The National Museum of the American Indian explores the history and culture of Native Americans. From Paleo-Indian artifacts to more modern pieces, the National Museum of the American Indian has around a million artifacts spanning various periods of history and relating to many different tribes. The National Museum of the... Read More

National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier explores the experiences of those who fought in the American Civil War.

The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier in Virginia explores the experiences of those who fought in the American Civil War. In its main exhibit, "Duty Called Me Here", the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier offers an audio guided tour of artefacts, multimedia presentations and dioramas which... Read More

National World War I Museum

The US National World War I Museum is a comprehensive museum of the history and legacy of this global conflict.

The US National World War I Museum chronicles the events of the conflict that engulfed thirty-six countries around the globe from 1914 to - at least officially - 1919. From the origins of the conflict to the experiences of those who went through it and its aftermath, the National World... Read More

New York African Burial Ground

The New York African Burial Ground is a memorial to the tens of thousands of Africans once buried there.

The New York African Burial Ground is a 6.6-acre area in Lower Manhattan where around 15,000 African slaves and free Africans were buried in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Hidden by development, the New York African Burial Ground was uncovered during construction works in 1991. Today, the New York African Burial... Read More

New York City Hall

New York City Hall is the oldest city hall in the US still in continuous use.

New York City Hall is the oldest city hall in the US still in continuous use, having been built between 1803 and 1812. Its architects, Joseph Francois Mangin and John McComb, were chosen as a result of a competition. Visitors can go on tours of New York City Hall, including seeing... Read More

Old North Church - Boston

Old North Church played a vital role in igniting the American Revolution and is part of the Freedom Trail.

Old North Church is Boston’s oldest church, having been built in 1723 in the Georgian style. Originally called Christ’s Church, Old North Church was also the tallest building in Boston at the time and thus came to serve an important role in the American Revolution. In the eighteenth century, the British... Read More

Old South Meeting House - Boston

Old South Meeting House was an important 18th century meeting place and the site where the Boston Tea Party began.

Old South Meeting House started life in 1729, when it was built as a Puritan house of worship, with a congregation in which leaders such as Samuel Adams and Benjamin Franklin mingled with artists like the famous African American poet Phillis Wheatley. A Forum for Dissent As tensions grew about the... Read More

Old State House - Boston

The Old State House in Boston played an important role in the American Revolution and was where the Declaration of Independence was proclaimed.

The Old State House in Boston played an important role in the American Revolution and is now one of the sites included in the Freedom Trail, a tourist trail made up of sixteen sites relating to the American Revolution against the British. Construction The Old State House was originally completed in 1713... Read More

Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park

Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park was the site of an American Civil War battle on 20 February 1864 won by the Confederates.

On 20 February 1864 at Olustee Battlefield, Union and Confederate troops clashed for five hours in what became Florida’s largest battle during the American Civil War. Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park now stands in commemoration of that historic battle and its 2,807 casualties. It was the Confederates led by Brigadier General... Read More

Palo Alto Battlefield

Palo Alto Battlefield was the site of the first major clash of the Mexican-American War on 8 May 1846.

Palo Alto Battlefield in Texas was the location of the first major battle of the Mexican-American War. This war was the culmination of heightened tension between the US and Mexico over territory, particularly Texas. On 8 May 1846, the two sides confronted each other on Palo Alto Battlefield, with the US... Read More

Paul Revere House

Paul Revere House was the Boston home of Paul Revere, a silversmith who played a vital role in the American Revolution.

Paul Revere House was the home of goldsmith/silversmith Paul Revere and his family from 1770 to 1800. In 1774 and 1775, during the build up to the American Revolution, Paul Revere was tasked as an express rider on behalf of the Massachusetts Committee of Safety and the Boston Committee... Read More

Petersen House

Petersen House was the site where President Abraham Lincoln died in 1865 after being shot across the street at Ford Theatre.

Petersen House was the boarding house where President Abraham Lincoln was taken after being shot across the road at Ford Theatre on the night of 14 April 1865. The President died the morning after arriving at Peterson House. The Peterson House Museum offers its visitors a brief tour including the room... Read More

Plimoth Plantation

The Plimoth Plantation is a living museum which includes a recreated 1627 English village and a Wampanoag homesite.

The Plimoth Plantation is a living museum which includes a recreated 1627 English village and a Wampanoag homesite. The English village is the main attraction at the Plimoth Plantation and brings to life the 17th century farming settlement built by the colonists. Buildings have been recreated and the site... Read More

Port Hudson

Port Hudson was the site of a lengthy siege during the American Civil War.

In 1863, the town of Port Hudson in Louisiana was the site of a forty-eight day siege by the Union against the Confederates. The Confederates viewed Port Hudson as a strategic position from which to defend the Mississippi, particularly as it was located in an acute bend in the river. Thus,... Read More

Richmond National Battlefield Park

Richmond National Battlefield Park in Virginia was a focal point of the American Civil War and the capital of the Confederacy.

Richmond National Battlefield Park in Virginia is a collection of several historic battlefields, representing some of the fiercest fighting in the American Civil War, including the Seven Days’ Battles. Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy, meaning that, between 1861 and 1865 Richmond and its surroundings were at the centre of... Read More

Seattle Underground Streets

An incredible set of nineteenth century underground ruins buried after a devastating fire in 1889. Today visitors can explore the storefronts, streets and houses of nineteenth-century Seattle.

The Seattle underground streets are an amazing set of subterranean sidewalks and passageways that were once the main centre of Seattle. The result of a quite astonishing example of determined urban-planning, the Seattle underground streets provide an amazing glimpse into the city's past. The story behind the Seattle underground... Read More

Shiloh Battlefield

Shiloh Battlefield was the site of the Battle of Pittsburgh Landing which took place in April 1862.

Shiloh Battlefield in Shiloh National Military Park in Tennessee and Mississippi was the site of a Union victory in April 1862 during the American Civil War. Known as the Battle of Shiloh and also as the Battle of Pittsburgh Landing, this clash saw the Confederates, led by General Albert Sidney Johnston... Read More

Sitka National Historical Park

Sitka National Historical Park in Alaska commemorates the Battle of Sitka and Russian American colonial history.

Sitka National Historical Park was the site of the Battle of Sitka between Russian forces and Alaska Natives in 1804. Built to commemorate this famous clash, Sitka National Historical Park is Alaska’s oldest national park. There is little remaining from the battle itself - only a clearing where the Tlingit... Read More

Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty is a 19th century Romanesque monument which has become an icon of freedom and is a World Heritage site.

The Statue of Liberty, which has the full name of ‘Statue of Liberty Enlightening the World’, is an iconic copper and steel statue in the entrance to New York Habour and an enduring symbol of freedom and independence. The Statue of Liberty was gifted to the United States of America by... Read More

Stones River Battlefield

Stones River Battlefield was the site of a fierce clash during the American Civil War which proved vital for the Union.

Between 31 December 1862 and 2 January 1863, Stones River Battlefield in Murfreesboro was the site of one of the bloodiest battles of the American Civil War. Prior to the Battle of Stones River, the Union had suffered a humiliating defeat at Fredericksburg. Morale was at an all time low... Read More

Stonewall Jackson Grave

Grave of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson.

The Stonewall Jackson Grave is the site of the grave of General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson. Located in Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery in Lexington, Virginia, Jackson is buried (minus his arm) along with members of his family. 'Stonewall' Jackson died from complications after he was wounded in the Battle of Chancellorsville. Visitors... Read More

Taos Pueblo

Taos Pueblo is a beautiful thousand year old Native American settlement in New Mexico.

Taos Pueblo is a Native American settlement in New Mexico’s Rio Grande, USA. The Pueblo community in Taos Pueblo is known to date back to the fourteenth century, although some archeologists think it was established as far back as the 1st century AD. The Pueblo tribe is one of the most... Read More

The Abbe Museum

The Abbe Museum in Maine focuses on Native American history and heritage, particularly that of the Wabanaki.

The Abbe Museum in Maine focuses on Native American history and heritage, particularly that of the Wabanaki, Maine’s indigenous people. Through a series of exhibitions, artefacts, workshops and events, the Abbe Museum looks at 10,000 years of Native American history and culture. The Abbe Museum actually has two venues,... Read More

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum explores the life of the 16th US president and his legacy, all in the context of wider US history.

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Illinois explores the life of the 16th US president and his legacy, all in the context of wider US history. From detailed recreations of the places where major events in his life took place - the White House, his boyhood home - to genuine... Read More

The Alamo

The Alamo in San Antonio is an iconic historic site which saw the famous siege and battle in March 1836.

The Alamo is an iconic historic site in downtown San Antonio that marks a symbol of Texan heroism. It has been immortalised in popular culture for the events which unfolded during the famous Battle of The Alamo, which took place on the 6th March 1836. The Alamo itself... Read More

The Anasazi Heritage Center

The Anasazi Heritage Center explores the history and culture of the Anasazi Native Americans.

The Anasazi Heritage Center in Southwest Colorado is an archaeological museum which explores the culture and history of the Ancestral Puebloan people, also known as the Anasazi. The Anasazi were Native Americans who lived and farmed in an area known as the “Four Corners”, made up of southwest Colorado, northeast Arizona,... Read More

The Arab American National Museum

The Arab American National Museum in Michigan is dedicated to the history, culture and national heritage of Arab Americans.

The Arab American National Museum in Michigan is dedicated to the history, culture and national heritage of Arab Americans. From stories of Arab American immigration into the US to the diverse lives of Arab Americans over the years and their impact on society, the Arab American Museum uses a... Read More

The Atomic Testing Museum

The Atomic Testing Museum tells the story of the atomic age and of the more local National Testing Site.

The Atomic Testing Museum tells the story of the atomic age and of the more local National Testing Site (NTS). From 1951 to 1992, the NTS in downtown Las Vegas was the US’s main nuclear testing area. From technical items such as Geiger counters and atomic age paraphernalia to timelines,... Read More

The Autry Museum

The Autry Museum explores the history and culture of the American west.

The Autry Museum, also known as the Autry National Centre, explores the history and culture of the American west. From Native American artefacts and artwork to equipment used in the famous gold rush and exhibits chronicling post-Civil War life in the region, the Autry Museum looks at a diverse range... Read More

The California State Mining and Mineral Museum

This museum is dedicated to exploring the history of the famous California Gold Rush and the legacy that it left on the state of California.

The California State Mining and Mineral Museum is dedicated to the history of the California Gold Rush and the state's mineral wealth and geological exploration. Visitors can explore a variety of exhibitions, including the mine tunnel, which explore the methods and conditions of the mining process in the 1880s. There... Read More

The Charleston Museum

The Charleston Museum chronicles the history of Charleston and the coastal region of South Carolina.

The Charleston Museum chronicles the history of Charleston and the coastal region of South Carolina. Exhibits include a history of South Carolina’s Lowcountry from the time of early natives, a collection of weapons from the 1750s onwards and the story of Charleston during the American Civil War. There is also... Read More

The Dickson Mounds Museum

The Dickson Mounds Museum explores the history and culture of Native Americans.

The Dickson Mounds Museum in Lewistown, Illinois, is an archaeological museum which offers an insight into the history and culture of Native Americans in the Illinois River Valley. Through artefacts, artwork and documents, the Dickson Mounds Museum, which is part of the Illinois State Museum, traces this history through 12,000 years.... Read More

The Freedom Trail

The Freedom Trail is a tour through Boston’s historical sites relating to the American Revolution.

The Freedom Trail takes visitors to Boston through a tour of sixteen sites in the city which were of importance before and during the American Revolution against British rule in the 18th century. Boston played a central role in igniting the American Revolution, also known as the American War of... Read More

The Gilcrease Museum

The Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa exhibits a comprehensive collection relating to the history of the American West.

The Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa exhibits a comprehensive collection of works of art and historic artefacts relating to the history of the American West. From the prehistoric to present day, the Gilcrease Museum covers a range of historic periods.... Read More

The James Madison Museum

The James Madison Museum in Orange, Virginia explores the life and legacy of the fourth US president.

The James Madison Museum in Orange, Virginia explores the life and legacy of the fourth US president, James Madison and his wife, Dolley. From personal items such as his favourite chair to a whole section dedicated to agriculture - something for which he as renowned - the James Madison Museum... Read More

The Journey Museum

The Journey Museum in South Dakota chronicles the history of the Black Hills region and the cultures that have existed there.

The Journey Museum in South Dakota chronicles the history of the Black Hills region and the cultures that have existed there such as the Native American Lakota people and the pioneers. It also explores the area’s natural environment. The Journey Museum is split into several sections, amongst them an... Read More

The King Centre

The King Centre in Atlanta is the final resting place of Dr Martin Luther King Jr.

The King Centre in Atlanta, Georgia commemorates Martin Luther King Jr, a Baptist minister and the leader of the African-American civil rights movement. Dr King was assassinated on 4 April 1968 at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee and his joint crypt with his wife is located at the King Centre. Visitors... Read More

The Korean War Veterans Memorial

The Korean War Veterans Memorial is dedicated to those who fought in the Korean War.

The Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington DC is a monument – or rather a collection of monuments - commemorating those who fought in the Korean War. The Korean War was a three year conflict (1950-1953) between the communist North Korea and non-communist southern Republic of Korea. The US, spurred into... Read More

The Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell is one of the most important symbols of freedom and liberty in the US.

The Liberty Bell is one of the most important symbols of freedom and liberty in the US. Cast in London’s East End, the Liberty Bell arrived at Independence Hall - then called the Pennsylvania State House - in 1753 where it was hung. There it cracked on its very first... Read More

The Liberty Memorial

The Liberty Memorial is a US national World War I monument in Kansas City in Missouri.

The Liberty Memorial is a US national World War I monument in Kansas City in Missouri. It commemorates those soldiers who died in this war and was dedicated in 1926. The Liberty Memorial is also home to the National World War I Museum and, in fact, you can enter... Read More

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is a world renowned museum exhibiting works spanning eight thousand years.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is one of the most famous art museums in the world, exhibiting pieces spanning over eight thousand years of history. From prehistoric art and that of the Ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans to medieval works, Asian art and art of the Americas, the... Read More

The National World War II Memorial

The National World War II Memorial in Washington DC is a civilian and military memorial.

The National World War II Memorial in Washington DC is a US monument commemorating the Second World War, particularly those who fought in the US armed forces and those civilians who assisted in and were affected by the conflict. World War II was a multi-national conflict initially prompted by Germany’s invasion... Read More

The Pacific Aviation Museum

The Pacific Aviation Museum tells the story of US aviation in this region during World War II.

The Pacific Aviation Museum on Ford Island in Hawaii is dedicated to telling the story of US aviation in the Pacific during World War II. As part of Pearl Harbor, it particularly focuses on the fateful day - 7 December 1941 - when Japanese forces launched a surprise attack on... Read More

The Steamboat Arabia Museum

The Steamboat Arabia Museum exhibits the cargo of a nineteenth century ship, offering an insight into her past and the world in which she operated.

The Steamboat Arabia Museum tells the story of a nineteenth century ship - the Steamboat Arabia - as well as the frontier world in which she operated. The Steamboat Arabia regularly transported people and goods along the Missouri River, a trip she was making in the autumn of 1856 when... Read More

The Texas Civil War Museum

The Texas Civil War Museum in Fort Worth holds an array of exhibits relating to the American Civil War.

The Texas Civil War Museum in Fort Worth explores the American Civil War, and the role of Texas within it, through a range of exhibits. Amongst the artefacts on displays, there is a large collection of weaponry, flags and clothing, including army uniforms from the war.... Read More

The US Capitol

The US Capitol is the seat of the United States Congress and an iconic building in its own right.

The US Capitol is the seat of the United States Congress, made up of the Senate and the House of Representatives, and, with its famous neoclassical facade and dramatic dome, is an iconic building in its own right. Construction of the first incarnation of The US Capitol began in... Read More

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC commemorates the soldiers who fought in the Vietnam War.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial, often shortened to the “VVM”, is a series of monuments in Washington DC commemorating those who fought in the Vietnam War. Originally envisioned by a Vietnam veteran Jan Scruggs, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was designed by Maya Lin. The Vietnam War was a conflict in which South... Read More

The Washington Monument

The Washington Monument is an obelisk built in honour of President George Washington.

The Washington Monument was designed by architect Robert Mills, made out of marble, granite, and sandstone and completed on 6 December 1884, almost thirty years after Mills’ death. The Washington Monument was constructed in honour of the first president of the United States of America, George Washington, who was considered to... Read More

The White House

The White House is the seat of the federal government of the United States of America and home of the President.

The White House has been the seat if the US government and home of Presidents of the United States of America for over 200 years. Original construction of the White House began in October 1792 after President George Washington chose what is now 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue as the location for the... Read More

The Women’s Museum

The Women’s Museum in Dallas is a national museum dedicated to women’s history.

The Women’s Museum in Dallas is a national museum dedicated to women’s history in every walk of American life and from past to present and even future. Spread over 70,000 square feet, this comprehensive museum uses a variety of tools, artworks, exhibits and media to explore this topic in depth.... Read More

The Wounded Knee Museum

The Wounded Knee Museum is dedicated to exploring the events of the Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890.

The Wounded Knee Museum in South Dakota tells the story of the Wounded Knee Massacre. The Wounded Knee Massacre was a significant event in the then longstanding dispute between the US government and the Native Americans. At that time, government policy was to confine Native Americans to reservations, which led to... Read More

Titan Missile Museum

The Titan Missile Museum is a former ICBM missile site that now offers tours to the public. It contains a genuine Titan II missile in its original silo.

The Titan Missile Museum is a cold-war underground missile silo turned public museum which still contains an actual Titan II missile. Once a functioning Titan II base, the Titan Missile Museum allows visitors to explore the realities of an Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) launch site. The complex is made up of... Read More

United States Holocaust Museum

The United States Holocaust Museum commemorates the Holocaust and explores the issue of genocide as a whole.

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC is dedicated to commemorating the Holocaust. The Holocaust was the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of approximately six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its collaborators. "Holocaust" is a word of Greek origin meaning "sacrifice by fire." The Nazis, who... Read More

US National Museum of the Marine Corps

The US National Museum of the Marine Corps chronicles the history of the Marines and their roles in various world conflicts.

The US National Museum of the Marine Corps chronicles the history of the Marines and their roles in various world conflicts. From photographs, information boards and medals to weapons and aircraft, the National Museum of the Marine Corps tells the story of the Marines and their accomplishments. The galleries... Read More

US National Museum of the Pacific War

The US National Museum of the Pacific War is a World War II museum focusing on the story of the Pacific theatre.

The US National Museum of the Pacific War is a World War II museum focusing on the story of the Pacific theatre. Artefacts, information panels, interactive exhibits and recreations all come together in the National Museum of the Pacific War to chronicle this conflict, from the build up to its... Read More

US National World War II Museum

The US National World War II Museum in New Orleans tells the story of the war, focusing particularly on amphibious attacks.

The US National World War II Museum in New Orleans tells the story of the war, focusing particularly on amphibious attacks. Using a combination of artifacts, photos, documents, information panels, stories and films, the National World War II Museum looks at everything from the Pacific to the African and European... Read More

USS Arizona Memorial

The USS Arizona Memorial is a monument to the American service people who died during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

The USS Arizona Memorial is a monument to the American service people who died during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. It is located on the Hawaiian island of Oahu. This surprise attack has become one of the most infamous in US history, particularly as it led... Read More

USS Missouri Memorial

The USS Missouri Memorial was a World War II battleship and the site where Japan officially surrendered to the Allies.

The USS Missouri Memorial was a World War II battleship and the site where Japan officially surrendered to the Allies by signing the 'Instrument of Surrender' on 2 September 1945. Today, it is docked at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Launched on 29 January 1944, the USS Missouri (BB-63) - often known... Read More

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Vicksburg Battlefield

Vicksburg Battlefield in Mississippi was the site of a pivotal Union victory during the American Civil War.

Vicksburg Battlefield was the site of one of the most important Union victories of the American Civil War and, together with the Battle of Gettysburg, marked a pivotal moment during the conflict. With its strategically vital location near the Mississippi River, wealth of resources, access to Richmond and ability to split... Read More

Washington National Cathedral

Washington National Cathedral is a site where national events, such as state funerals and Presidential inaugurations, are marked.

Washington National Cathedral, officially known as the "Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul," is the "church for national purposes" called for by President George Washington on January 24, 1791; initially advocated by intention of William W. Corcoran in 1871; and chartered by Congress during the administration of President... Read More

Washita Battlefield

Washita Battlefield was the site of a surprise US cavalry attack on a Native American settlement in 1868 during the American-Indian Wars.

On 27 November 1868 Washita Battlefield, then a Native American settlement of Peace Chief Black Kettle, was attacked by 7th U.S. Cavalry led by Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer. This attack formed part of the American-Indian Wars, a series of conflicts which took place between first the colonial and then... Read More

Photo by Jo Naylor (cc)

Wilson’s Creek Battlefield

Wilson’s Creek Battlefield was the site of a major battle which defined Missouri’s role in the American Civil War.

Wilson’s Creek Battlefield was the site of the second major battle of the American Civil War. The Battle of Wilson’s Creek, also known as the Battle of Oak Hills, took place in Springfield, Missouri on 10 August 1861 and was the first such conflict to take place west of the... Read More

Photo by Chor Ip (cc)

World Trade Centre

The World Trade Centre site was a location of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

The World Trade Centre was a complex of seven buildings in Manhattan in New York, which was destroyed by terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001 in a devastating event known as 9/11. The World Trade Centre included the iconic Twin Towers, two 110-storey buildings designed by Minoru Yamasaki in the 1960’s... Read More

Photo by By cliff1066™ (cc)

Yorktown Battlefield

Yorktown Battlefield is the site of the final major battle of the American Revolution.

Yorktown battlefield in Virginia is the location of the final battle of the American Revolution. It was at Yorktown battlefield that, on 19 October 1781, the British surrendered to the combined forces of the French and American armies, under the command of General Washington. This dramatic action marked the end of the... Read More