Historic sites in Tunisia

If you’re looking to explore Historic Sites in Tunisia and the surrounding area then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s a fantastic selection of  Historic Sites in Tunisia and you can plan some great things to see on your trips by browsing our selection. Once you’ve explored the  Historic Sites in Tunisia you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan out your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook.

Our database of historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other  Historic Sites in Tunisia, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting  our upload page.
 

Tunisia: Site Index

Photo by davehighbury (cc)

Bulla Regia

Bulla Regia was an Ancient Roman settlement in Tunisia, now famous for its subterranean villas.

Bulla Regia is a significant Ancient Roman archaeological site in Tunisia with a fascinating set of subterranean villas and other monuments. Tunisia was annexed into the Roman Empire in approximately 46 BC, under Julius Caesar. Previously a Berber site, Bulla Regia flourished under the Romans, who built a series of monuments... Read More

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Byrsa Hill

Part of the Archaeological site of Carthage, Byrsa Hill contains a number of remains from the original Punic city of Carthage as well as the Carthage National Museum and St Louis Cathedral.

Byrsa Hill forms part of the Archaeological site of Carthage and contains a number of interesting historical places to explore. Once the ancient citadel of this powerful city, Byrsa Hill was the military centre of ancient Carthage and was besieged and destroyed by the Romans in 146BC. However,... Read More

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Carthage

Carthage was once one of the most powerful cities of the ancient world. Today, the ruins of ancient Carthage can be found on the outskirts of modern day Tunis.

Carthage was one of the most powerful cities of the ancient world and spawned the powerful Carthaginian Empire which dominated much of the western Mediterranean. The ruins of this famed city can be found on the outskirts of modern day Tunis. Carthage itself was central to the history of the ancient... Read More

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Carthage National Museum

Carthage National Museum contains a wide selection of artefacts and exhibitions from the Punic, Roman and Byzantine periods of Carthage. It is a good place to begin you exploration of the ruins of this ancient city.

Carthage National Museum - sometimes simply called Carthage Museum - is one of the most important museums in Tunis and contains a range of interesting exhibitions and artefacts from the Carthaginian and Roman periods. Amongst the many exhibits are displays examining life in ancient Carthage, the conflicts with the... Read More

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Carthage Punic Port and Museum

The Carthage Punic Port and Museum hold the remains of the ancient military naval base of the Punic city of Carthage.

The Carthage Punic Port and Punic Port Museum can be found in the area of the ancient Carthaginian harbour near modern day Tunis. This ancient superpower built its reputation on its mastery of the seas and the ancient Port of Carthage would have once help over two hundred of... Read More

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Carthage Roman Theatre and Odeon

The Roman Theatre and Odeon in Carthage are the remains of the ancient public buildings which once held more than 5,000 spectators. The theatre has been significantly restored.

The Roman Theatre of Carthage is a restored ancient Roman theatre complex in Tunis which is now used to host a range of events. Originally built during the time of Roman control of Carthage, the theatre is believed to have been destroyed during the Vandal invasions of the... Read More

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Carthage Roman Villas and Kobba Bent el Rey

This site contains the well preserved remains of the wealthier elements of Roman Carthage, including a 4th century underground villa.

The Carthage Roman Villas site holds the ruins of a number of Roman luxury houses and Roman insulae - or apartment blocks. The area is believed to have housed some of the wealthier inhabitants of Roman Carthage and is thought to have suffered during the Vandal invasions. ... Read More

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Dougga

Dougga is an impressively well-preserved and UNESCO-listed ancient site in Tunisia.

Dougga (Thugga) in Tunisia is the location of the extremely well-preserved ruins of an ancient site inhabited by a series of cultures, notably the Numidians, the Punics, the ancient Greeks and the Romans. Dougga boasts a series of impressive ruins amidst its seventy hectares, including a 3,500-seater theatre, an amphitheatre, temples... Read More

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El Jem Amphitheatre

El Jem Amphitheatre is a magnificent UNESCO listed third century site in Tunisia.

El Jem Amphitheatre (El Djem) in Tunisia, also known as Thysdrus Amphitheatre after the original Roman settlement in this location, stands in the midst of a quiet town. This incredibly large and well-preserved Roman amphitheatre is El Jem’s star attraction and draws visitors from around the world. From the outside, the... Read More

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Enfidaville War Cemetery

Enfidaville War Cemetery is a World War II Commonwealth graveyard in Tunisia.

Enfidaville War Cemetery in Tunisia is a World War II Commonwealth cemetery housing the graves of 1,551 soldiers who died in the course of the North Africa Campaign, particularly the Tunisia Campaign. Of these graves, 88 are unidentified. The Tunisia Campaign was fought between Allied and Axis forces from 1942 to... Read More

Haidra

Haidra contains the remains of the Roman city of Ammaedara and includes a number of interesting ruins including the large Byzantine fort and underground Roman baths.

One of the earliest Roman settlements in North Africa, Haidra in Tunisia contains the remains of the Roman city of Ammaedara. Well off the beaten track, Haidra – also called Hydrah – attracts few tourists and even the archaeological excavations have been few and far between. Founded in the first century... Read More

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Kasserine

Kasserine was an ancient Roman settlement known as Cillium, the remains of which can be seen today.

Kasserine, also known as Cillium, is a city in central Tunisia with several Ancient Roman monuments and ruins. Founded in approximately the second century AD, Kasserine became a Roman colonia known as Colonia Cillilana or just Cillium. Just west of the main city of Kasserine, visitors can see the remains of this city,... Read More

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La Malga Cisterns

Amazingly well preserved ancient storage tanks, these cisterns supplied water to the ancient city of Carthage and, though slightly off the beaten track, are well worth a visit.

La Malga Cisterns are vast ancient storage tanks used to supply water to the ancient city of Carthage. An aqueduct system  - the Zaghouan Aqueduct - that ran for over 100km brought water to the ancient metropolis and the Malga Cisterns were used to store that water and then run it... Read More

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Medina of Tunis

The Medina of Tunis is the historic quarter of Tunis and a UNESCO World Heritage site.

The Medina of Tunis, the historic quarter of the capital of Tunisia, is a labyrinth of some seven hundred monuments and buildings, many dating to the period between the twelfth and the sixteenth centuries. The Medina of Tunis was founded in the seventh century following the fall of Carthage, but flourished... Read More

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Roman Amphitheatre of Carthage

Once holding over 30,000 spectators, the Roman Amphitheatre of Carthage was one of the biggest ancient stadia in North Africa. Today much of the site lies in ruins but it is still worth a visit.

The Roman Amphitheatre of Carthage was once a major Roman stadium, the ruins of which can be found near modern-day Tunis. Probably built at the end of the first century AD, it is believed to have been able to hold up to 35,000 spectators. Unlike other Roman Amphitheatres in... Read More

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Sanctuary of Tophet

The Sanctuary of Tophet is an ancient Cartheginian burial site containing a vast number of children’s graves.

The Sanctuary of Tophet holds the remains of a vast number of children’s graves dating back to the Punic period of Carthage. Many historians have speculated that the Carthaginians practised child-sacrifice during times of serious hardship, though this point is hotly disputed. Today this eerie site can be found... Read More

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Sbeitla

Sbeitla in Tunisia flourished as a Roman city from the 1st century AD.

Sbeitla in Tunisia was once a flourishing ancient city, the spectacular remains of which are among the best Roman ruins in the world. This startling site, also at times known as Sufetula, thrived as a Roman settlement from the 1st century AD before becoming a Christian centre, a Byzantine city and... Read More

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The Antonine Baths

One of the largest ancient bath complexes ever built, the ruins of the second century Antonine Baths are a real treasure to explore.

The Antonine Baths was a huge Roman bath complex in ancient Carthage, the well-preserved ruins of which can still be viewed today. Originally built from 145 to 165 AD, mostly during the reign of the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius, the Antonine Baths were among the largest baths to be... Read More

The Bardo Museum

The Bardo Museum is an archaeological museum in Tunisia most renowned for its Roman mosaic collection.

The Bardo Museum (Le Musee National du Bardo) in Tunis is Tunisia’s national archaeological museum and contains artefacts from throughout the country’s history. From prehistoric items to Punic ceremonial artefacts believed to be connected with practices of human sacrifice and right through to art from the Islamic era, the Bardo Museum... Read More

The Kasserine Pass

The Kasserine Pass in Tunisia was the site of a major US defeat during World War II.

The Battle of the Kasserine Pass was a World War II battle which formed part of the clash between Allied and Axis forces to gain control of Tunisia, known as the Tunisia Campaign. It would be the worst defeat the US had yet experienced in the course of the war. In... Read More

Photo by Erik Pitti (cc)

The Magon Quarter

The Magon Quarter in Carthage holds the remains of a small Punic residential site and section of the ancient defensive wall.

The Magon Quarter contains the remains of a small Punic residential area dating back to the Carthaginian city of Carthage. The Magon Quarter is relatively small and there aren’t many remains to see, though the site does contain a section of the ancient city wall, dating back to the fifth... Read More

The North Africa American Cemetery

The North Africa American Cemetery is a World War II military graveyard in Tunisia.

The North Africa American Cemetery in Tunisia is a military cemetery and memorial site, mostly for casualties of World War II. In particular, the North Africa American Cemetery houses the graves of those who were killed in campaigns in North Africa and the Persian Gulf. Located in Tunisia, which was the... Read More

Photo by Neil Rickards (cc)

The Zaghouan Aqueduct

Built by the Emperor Hadrian, the Zaghouan Aqueduct supplied water to the Roman city of Carthage and stretched for over 100 miles.

The Zaghouan Aqueduct - or Aqueduct of Hadrian - was a Roman aqueduct which supplied water to the ancient city of Carthage, the ruins of which can still be seen today. Built around 130 AD, during the reign of the Emperor Hadrian, the Zaghouan Aqueduct was constructed as a... Read More