Historic sites in Rome

If you’re looking to discover historic sites in Rome and the surrounding area then you can explore our interactive Rome Historic Sites Map above or navigate further by using the Rome Historic Sites list below.

From the wonders of the Colosseum to the amazing Palatine Hill and the hidden secrets of San Clemente, Rome is brimming with amazing historic places. With a legacy that spans over 2,000 years of history - and such giants from the past as Julius Caesar, Augustus and Constantine once treading its streets - the eternal city has scintillating historic attractions around every corner.

There’s a fantastic selection of historic sites in Rome and you can plan some great things to see on your trips by browsing our selection. Once you’ve explored the historic sites of Rome you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan out your very own Rome tour and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible guide will ensure you make the most of your time exploring Rome's historical places.

Our database of Rome's historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other historic sites in Rome, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

Rome: Site Index

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Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine was a triumphal arch built by the Emperor Constantine the Great in 315AD.

The Arch of Constantine was a triumphal arch built by the Roman Emperor Constantine I, also known as Constantine the Great, in 315AD. Erected to commemorate Constantine’s victory at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312AD, the Arch of Constantine contains an inscription dedicated to the emperor which can still be... Read More

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Arch of Janus

The Arch of Janus is an Ancient Roman triumphal arch and historic site in Rome.

The Arch of Janus in Rome is an ancient Roman monument which is exceptional for being the only remaining triumphal arch in the city to have four faces, a design feature known as Quadrifrons. Constructed in the early fourth century AD, the Arch of Janus was located at the periphery of... Read More

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Arch of Septimius Severus

The Arch of Septimus Severus is a Roman triumphal arch built by the Emperor Septimus Severus to celebrate his military victories.

The Arch of Septimius Severus is a Roman triumphal arch built by the Emperor Septimius Severus to celebrate his military victories. Located in the Roman Forum, the Arch of Septimius Severus commemorates the short war between Rome and the Parthian Empire, fought by the Emperor between 194-199AD. The brief conflict resulted... Read More

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Arch of Titus

The Arch of Titus is a Roman triumphal arch built by the Emperor Domitian to commemorate the victories of his elder brother, Emperor Titus.

The Arch of Titus is a Roman triumphal arch built by the Emperor Domitian to commemorate the victories of his elder brother, Emperor Titus. The Arch was completed shortly after Titus’ death in 81AD. Though only Emperor for two years, Titus had fought many campaigns under his father, Emperor Vespasian. The... Read More

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Area Sacra di Largo Argentina

Area Sacra di Largo Argentina is the site of four Ancient Roman temples.

Area Sacra di Largo Argentina is a small, but fascinating archaeological site in Rome. In the course of building works carried out in the 1920’s, four Roman Republican-era temples were found in the square of Largo di Torre Argentina. The remains of the four temples of Area Sacra di Largo Argentina,... Read More

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Atrium Vestae

The Atrium Vestae in the Roman Forum was home to Ancient Rome’s only holy priestesses.

The Atrium Vestae or 'House of the Vestal Virgins' in the Roman Forum was a fifty-room palace in Ancient Rome. Originally part of the Temple of Vesta, the Atrium Vestae served as the home of the priestesses of the g-dess of the hearth, Vesta. These holy women were known as... Read More

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Aula Ottagona

Part of the vast 4th century Baths of Diocletian, the Aula Ottagona is probably the best preserved original structure.

The Aula Ottagona, or Octagonal Hall, is probably the best surviving structure from the Baths of Diocletian. Built in 306AD, the baths were the largest of the ancient world and could hold up to 3,000 people at a time. Today, the remains of the baths can be seen over a wide... Read More

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Basilica Aemelia

Basilica Aemelia was a commercial building of Ancient Rome located in the Forum.

Basilica Aemelia was a commercial building in the Roman Forum where the financial professionals of Ancient Rome would convene. Considered to be one of the most impressive of the Forum’s structures, it is thought that Basilica Aemelia was built and rebuilt several times. Its first incarnation may have been erected in... Read More

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Basilica Julia

Basilica Julia was an Ancient Roman courthouse in Rome’s Forum.

Basilica Julia, also known as Basilica Iulia, was a civil courthouse in the Roman Forum which would also have housed a series of shops. Initially founded by Julius Caesar in 54 BC, it soon burnt to the ground and was rebuilt and completed under Augustus in 12 BC. In fact, Basilica... Read More

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Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine

A well preserved historic sites in Rome, the Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine was an Ancient Roman meeting house, the remains of which stand in the Roman Forum.

The Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine is the largest structure in the Roman Forum and still has part of its roof as well as three of its colossal arches and vaults. Initial construction of the Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine started under the Roman Emperor Maxentius in 308 AD and was... Read More

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Baths of Caracalla

The Baths of Caracalla were an Ancient Roman public baths and leisure complex and remain well-preserved.

The Baths of Caracalla (Terme di Caracalla in Italian) are an ancient Roman public baths complex in Rome, the incredible remains of which are one of the very best ancient sites in Rome. It was the Emperor Septimius Severus who began building the Baths of Caracalla in 206 AD, but they... Read More

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Baths of Diocletian

The huge Baths of Diocletian complex was built in the early 4th century and covers a vast area. Today elements can be seen in a number of buildings, including the National Museum of Rome.

Once the largest ancient baths complex in the world, the Baths of Diocletian – or Terme di Diocleziano – was built between 298AD and 306AD in honour of the Roman Emperor Diocletian. Set out along the traditional model of a Roman baths complex, the Baths of Diocletian contained a frigidarium (cold... Read More

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Capuchin Crypt

The Capuchin Crypt in Rome is an eerie underground vault, located beneath a medieval church, which contains the macabre remains of 4,000 Capuchin monks.

The Capuchin Crypt (Cripta dei Cappuccini) in Rome is an underground burial vault situated beneath a medieval church which contains the remains of four thousand Capuchin monks. The church itself, Santa Maria della Concezione, was built in the 1620s by Capuchin Cardinal Antonio Barberini. When the monks moved in they brought... Read More

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Castel Sant Angelo

Castel Sant Angelo was the tomb of the Roman Emperor Hadrian later used as a fort.

Castel Sant Angelo in Rome was originally constructed as the magnificent Mausoleum of Hadrian, the fourteenth emperor of Rome from 117AD to 138AD. It is unclearly as to exactly when Castel Sant Angelo was built, but most sources date it to between 123 and 139 AD. A fortress-like structure, successive Roman... Read More

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Catacombs of San Callisto

The Catacombs of San Callisto are the largest and most famous of Rome’s Christian catacombs.

The Catacombs of San Callisto are just one of the many catacombs of Rome, five of which are regularly open to the public. These Catacombs were used by Christians as subterranean burial places. Built in around 150 AD, the Catacombs of San Callisto span five floors and hold over half... Read More

Chiesa del Gesu

The Chiesa del Gesu is an historic church in Rome notable for its artistic decorations, particularly its ceiling frescoes, and its place as the centre of the Catholic Jesuit Order.

The Chiesa del Gesu is an historic church in Rome notable for both its artistic wonders and its place as the centre of the Catholic Jesuit Order. The brainchild of the founder of the Jesuits, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, Ignatius himself did not live to see his vision realised. However, the... Read More

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Circus Maximus

One of the most famous historic sites in Rome, the Circus Maximus was the main sports stadium of Ancient Rome.

The Circus Maximus (Circo Massimo) in Rome was the main and largest sports stadium in Ancient Rome. Overlooked from the north by the emperors’ palaces on the Palatine, this grand arena was the site of exciting chariot races watched by an exhilarated crowd. Built and rebuilt several times, at its largest... Read More

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Circus of Maxentius

The Circus of Maxentius is one of the best preserved Ancient Roman arenas in Rome.

The Circus of Maxentius (Circo di Massenzio), in southern Rome may have been much smaller than the Circus Maximus – only holding approximately 10,000 spectators – but today it has its revenge by being far better preserved that its grander counterpart. Located on the famous Via Appia, the Circus of Maxentius... Read More

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Curia Julia

The Curia Julia was the senate house in Ancient Rome and part of the Roman Forum.

The Curia Julia in the Roman Forum was the senate house in Ancient Rome, built under Julius Caesar and later restored by Diocletian after being damaged by fire. It stood at the very heart of the ancient city, both physically and politically and would have borne witness to some of the... Read More

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Domus Augustana

Domus Augustana was the palace of Ancient Rome’s emperors on the Palatine Hill.

The Domus Augustana on the Palatine Hill was a magnificent palace used as the residence of Rome’s emperors. Built by the Emperor Domitian, the incredible remains of the Domus Augustana include a remarkable courtyard with the remnants of a fountain and many of its walls. The Domus Augustana should not be... Read More

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Flavian Palace

An important historical attraction in Rome, the Flavian Palace on the Palatine Hill was where Roman emperors held official functions.

The Flavian Palace (Domus Flavian) on Rome’s prestigious Palatine Hill was an Ancient Roman palace built by the Emperor Domitian in the first century AD. A place where official functions were held, the Flavian Palace was the public counterpart to Domus Augustana, which served as the private home of Rome’s emperors. The... Read More

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Forum of Augustus

The Forum of Augustus was built by the Roman emperor to celebrate avenging Caesar’s assassins.

The Forum of Augustus or “Foro di Augsto” in Rome was built by its namesake, the emperor Augustus (b. 63 BC – d. AD 14) following the Battle of Philippi in 42 BC. In this battle, Augustus, together with Mark Anthony, emerged victorious over Cassius and Brutus, the assassins of... Read More

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Forum of Caesar

The Forum of Caesar was the first of the Imperial Forums built in Ancient Rome.

The Forum of Caesar or “Foro di Cesare” in Rome is one of a series of Imperial Forums built by successive Roman emperors. First commissioned by Julius Caesar in around 54 BC and completed in 46 BC, the Forum of Caesar was the first of these forums and was intended... Read More

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Forum of Trajan

The Forum of Trajan was one of the Imperial Forums of Ancient Rome.

The Forum of Trajan or “Foro di Traiano” in Rome was built by the Emperor Trajan from 107 AD and it was inaugurated in 112 AD. Trajan, who reigned from 98 to 117 AD, built his magnificent Forum of Trajan after emerging victorious from several military campaigns, particularly the conquest... Read More

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Hadrian’s Villa

Hadrian’s Villa, or Villa Adriana, is perhaps the best-preserved Roman villa complex in the world. The site covers almost 250 acres and consists of over 30 buildings and a number of other points of interest.

Hadrian’s Villa, or Villa Adriana, is perhaps the best-preserved Roman villa complex in the world. Built in the early 2nd century, the villa was the central hub of power in the Roman world for the latter years of Emperor Hadrian’s reign. Hadrian’s Villa covers almost 250 acres and consists of over... Read More

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Ludus Magnus

The preserved ruins of Ancient Rome’s largest and most prestigious gladiator training school, located next to the Colosseum in central Rome.

The Ludus Magnus was ancient Rome’s largest and most prestigious gladiator training school, located right alongside the famous Roman Colosseum. Originally built between 81-96AD by Emperor Domitian, it was used as a training school for the gladiators who were to fight in the Colosseum. It was later rebuilt by Emperor Trajan... Read More

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Mamertine Prison

The Mamertine Prison was an Ancient Roman prison in which Saints Peter and Paul may have been held.

The Mamertine Prison in Rome, also known as Carcere Mamertino, is an ancient prison thought to date back to perhaps as early as the seventh century BC. The Romans continued using the Mamertine Prison throughout the Republican and Imperial eras as late as the fourth century AD, with executions also... Read More

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Mausoleum of Augustus

One of the most interesting of Rome’s historic sites, the Mausoleum of Augustus was the tomb of Rome’s first emperor.

The Mausoleum of Augustus (Mausoleo di Augusto) was constructed in approximately 28 BC as the tomb of the first emperor of Rome. When it was created, the Mausoleum of Augustus was a large circular building intended to be the final resting place of both Augustus and his family. Those buried at... Read More

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Mausoleum of Cecilia Metella

The Mausoleum of Cecilia Metella is a 1st century BC tomb turned medieval fortress.

The Mausoleum of Cecilia Metella (Mausoleo di Caecillia Metella) is a large well-preserved tomb along Rome’s Via Appia. The Mausoleum of Cecilia Metella is thought to have been built in the late first century BC and incorporated into a medieval fort in the fourteenth century. Whilst little is known about its namesake,... Read More

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Monument to Victor Emmanuel II

The Monument to Victor Emmanuel II celebrates the first king to rule a unified Italy.

The Monument to Victor Emmanuel II (Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II) is a vast tribute to the Italian king known as the “Father of the Fatherland”. Victor Emmanuel II reigned from 1861 to 1878. He was the leading force behind the unification of Italy and served as its first king... Read More

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Musei Capitolini

The Musei Capitolini in Rome host a huge wealth of artifacts and exhibits from the ancient, medieval and renaissance periods.

Musei Capitolini (Capitoline Museums) stand on the ancient Capitoline Hill in the centre of Rome and host a huge wealth of artifacts and exhibits from the ancient, medieval and renaissance periods. Among Musei Capitolini’s many wonders are collections of classical sculptures and statues, exhibits on ancient mythology, medieval and renaissance artworks... Read More

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Ostia Antica

One of the lesser known historic sites of Rome, the site of Ostia Antica contains the ruins of the port of ancient Rome and visitors can view some amazingly well preserved remains of the settlement.

Ostia Antica is an extraordinary Roman site that contains the ruins of the ancient port town that served as the gateway to Rome. Just half an hour from central Rome by train, Ostia Antica has all the inspiration of Pompeii without the throngs of tourists. In fact, if you want to... Read More

Palace of Septimius Severus

The Palace of Septimius Severus was magnificent extension of the Domus Augustana on the Palatine.

The Palace of Septimius Severus on the Palatine Hill was an extension of the Domus Augustana and was built during the reign of the Roman Emperor Lucius Septimius Severus (193 - 211 AD). The Palatine Hill was closely linked with the foundation of ancient Rome and housed some of its most... Read More

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Palatine Hill

The Palatine Hill is known as the birthplace of Rome. It houses some of the city’s most impressive ancient sites and is one of the most important historical places in Rome.

The Palatine Hill (Palatino) is considered to be the place where Rome was born. One of Rome’s seven hills, the Palatine Hill is closely linked with the city’s history and houses some of its most ancient and important sites. Legend says that the twins Romulus and Remus were taken to... Read More

Palazzo dei Conservatori

Palazzo dei Conservatori displays numerous important classical pieces. Part of the Musei Capitolini.

The Palazzo dei Conservatori is one of the buildings of Rome’s Capitoline Museums or “Musei Capitolini”. Like its counterpart Palazzo Nuovo, Palazzo dei Conservatori displays classical pieces as well as paintings. Highlights of Palazzo dei Conservatori include a first century AD bronze sculpture known as the Spinario, which depicts a boy... Read More

Palazzo Nuovo

The Palazzo Nuovo is an archaeological museum of Ancient Greek and Roman art. Part of the Musei Capitolini.

The Palazzo Nuovo is part of the Capitoline Museums, known in Italian as Musei Capitolini, which is a famous museum complex in Rome housing an incredible array of artwork and artefacts spanning much of Rome’s history. Originally established in 1471, when Pope Sixtus I donated a series of bronze statues to... Read More

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Pantheon

The Pantheon in Rome is one of the most famous and well-preserved ancient buildings in the world.

The Pantheon in Rome is one of the most famous and well-preserved ancient buildings in the world. Originally built by Marcus Agrippa in 25BC, the Pantheon served as a temple to the many gods of Rome. The original Pantheon was destroyed by the great fire of 80AD and the structure which... Read More

Ponte Rotto

Ponte Rotto is the remaining arch of a second century BC Roman Republic bridge.

Ponte Rotto, originally known as Pons Aemilius is Rome’s oldest, albeit defunct, stone bridge. Built in the second century BC to replace its wooden predecessor, Ponte Rotto, meaning the “broken bridge” is indeed missing most of its original structure. Today, only an arch remains of Ponte Rotto, worth seeing if you are... Read More

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Pyramid of Cestius

An amazing ancient site in Rome, the The Pyramid of Cestius is a tomb dating back to Ancient Rome.

The Pyramid of Cestius is the tomb of affluent magistrate, Caius Cestius which was built between 18 and 12 BC. Constructed of white marble and brick, this ostentatious 35-metre high tomb was likely built in this style due to the popularity of all things Egyptian which swept Rome after Egypt was... Read More

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Roman Forum

The Roman Forum was the very centre of ancient Rome. Throughout the lifespan of Roman civilisation the Forum served as the focus of political, civic and religious life.

The Roman Forum, or Forum Romanum, was the very centre of ancient Rome. Throughout the lifespan of Roman civilisation the Forum served as the focus of political, civic and religious life. From magnificent temples and triumphal arches to the very seat of power in the Senate house, the Roman Forum was... Read More

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San Clemente

One of the more hidden of Rome’s historic sites, San Clemente is a church built atop a series of fourth and third century BC ruins.

San Clemente is a beautifully frescoed twelfth century historic basilica in Rome. However, whilst interesting in its own right, it is what lies underneath San Clemente which is a highlight to historians. In the mid-nineteenth century, when San Clemente was excavated, it was discovered to have been built over both a... Read More

San Giovanni in Laterano

San Giovanni in Laterano is Rome’s cathedral, originally founded by Constantine the Great.

San Giovanni in Laterano, or Rome Cathedral, is a basilica known to many as the “cathedral of the world”, by virtue of the fact that it is the cathedral of Rome and thus the seat of the Pope. Founded by the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great in the early fourth century... Read More

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Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri

An impressive 16th century church in Rome, built by Michelangelo using the structural remains of the ancient Baths of Diocletian.

The Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri (St. Mary of the Angels and the Martyrs) is a large and impressive 16th century church constructed within the remains of the Baths of Diocletian and masterminded by renowned renaissance artist Michelangelo. Though centuries had passed since the fall of the... Read More

Santa Maria in Trastevere

Santa Maria in Trastevere is thought to have been the first Christian church in Rome.

Santa Maria in Trastevere is thought to have been one of the first – if not actually the first – of the Christian churches in Rome. Whilst most of the building and works contained in Santa Maria in Trastevere date back to the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the church itself may... Read More

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St Peter’s Basilica

St Peter’s Basilica is one of the holiest of Christian sites with a history dating back to Ancient Rome.

St Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City is one of the most important Christian sites in the world and is a church (rather than a cathedral) with a long and illustrious history. Also known as the 'Papal Basilica of Saint Peter' and in Italian as 'Basilica Papale di San Pietro in... Read More

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St Sebastian Catacombs

The St. Sebastian Catacombs are some of the earliest of the Christian catacombs in Rome.

The St Sebastian Catacombs (Catacombe di San Sebastiano) are fourth century AD underground Christian burial tombs. They are some of the earliest of their kind in Rome. The many catacombs of Rome are the remnants of early Christianity, a reminder of a time when persecuted Christians would bury their dead in... Read More

Temple of Antoninus and Faustina

The Temple of Antoninus and Faustina is one of the best preserved of the historical structures in the Roman Forum.

Initially constructed in 141 AD, the Temple of Antoninus and Faustina was built by Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius in honour of his wife, Faustina. It is one of the best preserved structures in the Roman Forum. Faustina was deified following her death and the temple – then just the Temple... Read More

Temple of Caesar

The Temple of Caesar was built in honour of Julius Caesar. Its altar remains in the Roman Forum.

The Temple of Caesar (Tempio del Divo Giuli), the remains of which can be seen in the Roman Forum, was dedicated to the Roman Dictator Julius Caesar (100BC - 44BC). Caesar, who was murdered by the senators Cassius, Brutus and their supporters on 15 March 44BC, was cremated. Following his death,... Read More

Temple of Castor and Pollux

The Temple of Castor and Pollux in the Roman Forum was built following a military victory.

The Temple of Castor and Pollux (Templum Castoris) was an ancient Roman temple in Rome’s Forum. First constructed in the fifth century BC, the Temple of Castor and Pollux was then rebuilt in the early first century AD. The Temple of Castor and Pollux was dedicated to Helen of Troy’s twin... Read More

Temple of Concord

The Temple of Concord was an Ancient Roman temple in Rome’s Forum.

The Temple of Concord (Tempio della Concordia) was an ancient Roman temple dedicated to Concordia, the godess of harmony. It is unclear when the Temple of Concord was first constructed. Roman statesman Marcus Furius Camillus vowed to build it in 367 BC, although there is little evidence as to whether he... Read More

Temple of Saturn

The Temple of Saturn was the site of the national treasury of Ancient Rome, the ruins of which stand in the Roman Forum.

The Temple of Saturn in the Roman Forum was a sacred ancient Roman temple dedicated to Saturn, the god of seed-sowing. One of the oldest of the Roman Forum structures, the Temple of Saturn was originally built sometime between 501 BC and 497 BC and reconstructed in the fourth century BC.... Read More

Temple of Venus and Rome

The Temple of Venus and Rome was created under Hadrian and is located in the Roman Forum.

The Temple of Venus and Rome, known in Latin as Templum Veneris et Romae, in the Roman Forum was built in approximately 135 AD during the reign of the Roman Emperor Hadrian. Hadrian himself is thought to have heavily influenced the design of this temple, although it was later renovated... Read More

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Temples of the Forum Boarium

The Temples of the Forum Boarium are two second century BC Roman republic temples.

The Temples of the Forum Boarium are two of the best preserved Roman temples to have survived from the Republican era. Comprised of two temples, the Temple of Hercules Victor and the Temple of Portunus, the Temples of the Forum Boarium date back to approximately the second century BC. The Temple of... Read More

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The Ara Pacis Museum

A really interesting place to visit, the Ara Pacis Museum displays the Emperor Augustus’s Altar of Peace.

The Ara Pacis Museum (Museo dell Ara Pacis) in Rome houses the Altar of Peace, which was built under instructions from the Emperor Augustus and sanctioned by the Senate. Augustus decided to build the Ara Pacis to celebrate his military campaigns which resulted in the outbreak of peace in the... Read More

The Claudio Aqueduct - Rome

The Claudio Aqueduct is an Ancient Roman aqueduct which served Rome from 52 AD.

The Claudio Aqueduct (Acquedotto Claudio) was one of Rome’s ancient aqueducts. Whilst it was the Emperor Claudius, after whom it is named, who completed the Claudio Aqueduct in 52 AD, it was his predecessor, the Emperor Caligula who began its construction in 38AD. Today, parts of the Claudio Aqueduct are fairly... Read More

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The Colosseum

Once the largest amphitheatre of Ancient Rome where gladiators, criminals and lions alike fought for their lives, the Colosseum remains a world renowned, iconic symbol of the Roman Empire. The most famous historic sites in Rome.

The Colosseum is a site like no other. Beyond a shadow of a doubt, nothing represents the sheer power and magnificence of the Roman Empire like this stunning piece of ancient architecture. The Colosseum, or ‘Colosseo’ in Italian, was once the largest amphitheatre in the Roman Empire. It was built in... Read More

The Felice Aqueduct - Rome

The Felice Aqueduct in Rome dates back to the sixteenth century.

The Felice Aqueduct in Rome is a late sixteenth century aqueduct built by Pope Sixtus V in order to provide parts of Rome with water. Parts of this aqueduct can still be seen today. The site is within the Via Appia Antica Regional Park, which offers bicycle hire to see all... Read More

The House of Augustus

The House of Augustus on the Palatine Hill was the home of Rome’s first emperor.

The House of Augustus, located on the eminent Palatine Hill, was the modest home of Ancient Rome’s first emperor, Augustus. The grandnephew and heir of Julius Caesar, Augustus lived in this house for many years. The House of Augustus should not be confused with Domus Augustana, which was the later palace... Read More

The House of Livia

An interesting place to see, the House of Livia was the home of Augustus’s third wife

The House of Livia, also known as Livia’s House or Livia’s Villa, was the home of the third wife of Augustus, the first emperor of the Roman Empire, and the mother of its second emperor, Tiberius. Powerful and formidable, Livia was an important figure of Ancient Rome, a status she managed... Read More

The Palatine Hill Stadium

The Palatine Hill Stadium was part of the imperial palace of Ancient Rome’s emperors.

The partially-intact Palatine Hill Stadium once formed part of Domus Augustana, the imperial palace of Rome’s emperors. Built by the Emperor Domitian, the Domus Augustana was a magnificent palace used as the primary residence of many of Rome’s emperors. The exact purpose of the Palatine Hill Stadium itself is unknown, with... Read More

The Palatine Museum

The Palatine Museum exhibits ancient finds from the famous Palatine Hill in Rome.

The Palatine Museum (Museo Palatino) on Rome’s Palatine Hill houses a collection of finds from this incredible archaeological site. With artefacts dating back as far as the Middle Palaeolithic era, the Palatine Museum offers a good overview of the area considered to be the birthplace of Rome. The main exhibits at... Read More

The Protestant Cemetery of Rome

The Protestant Cemetery of Rome is the final resting place of famous non-Catholic poets, artists and philosophers.

The Protestant Cemetery of Rome, also known as the Non-Catholic Cemetery or “Cimitero Acattolico”, is the final burial place of many prominent figures, especially artists. Whilst called the “Protestant” cemetery, it is a cemetery for non-Catholics and houses graves of several other religions such as Jewish graves. Seen by some as... Read More

The Regia

The Regia in Rome’s Forum was a royal residence turned office of the Pontifex Maximus.

The Regia, the remains of which are located in the Roman Forum, was initially the royal residence of the first kings of ancient Rome. It later became the seat of Rome’s most high ranking priest, the Pontifex Maximus. Among many notable names to hold this position, Julius Caesar would have... Read More

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The Spanish Steps

A famous tourist destination, the Spanish Steps are an eighteenth century staircase and a focal point for Rome’s visitors.

The Spanish Steps (Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti) are one of Rome’s most popular tourist attractions. A grand staircase with 138 steps leading down to the Piazza di Spagna, the Spanish Steps were designed in the 1720s by Francesco de Sanctis, an Italian architect, and completed in 1726. They were called... Read More

The Temple of Vesta

The Temple of Vesta was an Ancient Roman shrine now found on the Roman Forum.

The Temple of Vesta was an ancient Roman shrine dedicated to the goddess of the hearth, the remains of which are found in the southeast of the Roman Forum. Serving as the temple of the Vestal Virgins, the priestesses dedicated to Vesta, the Temple of Vesta housed an eternal flame... Read More

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The Trevi Fountain

One of the most famous historic sites of Rome, the Trevi Fountain is Rome’s largest and most iconic fountain.

The Trevi Fountain (Fountain di Trevi) is an iconic eighteenth century monument in Rome. It was designed by Nicola Salvi, but following his death in 1751 it was continued by Giuseppe Pannini and completed in 1762. A stunning depiction of several ancient deities and resplendent with frescos of legends and myths,... Read More

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Theatre of Marcellus

The partially-preserved remains of one of the most important theatres in ancient Rome, built by Julius Caesar and Augustus.

Though only partially preserved, the ruins of the Theatre of Marcellus in Rome are among the oldest remains of an ancient Roman theatre to have survived. One of the most important ancient Roman public buildings, the Theatre of Marcellus was the brainchild of Julius Caesar himself, though the Roman dictator did... Read More

Tomb of Eurysaces the Baker

The Tomb of Eurysaces the Baker is an impressive ancient tomb dating back to 30BC.

The Tomb of Eurysaces the Baker is an impressive and peculiar ancient tomb in Rome dating back to around 30BC. The tomb was built by a former slave turned wealthy freeman named Marcus Vergilius Eurysaces – who made his fortune as a grand baker and contractor. Unique in shape and design, it... Read More

Trajan’s Markets

Trajan’s Markets was an Ancient Roman administrative centre located on Trajan’s Forum.

The site of Trajan’s Markets, located in the Forum of Trajan in Rome, is one of the best preserved elements of the ancient city to have survived, and is an oft-overlooked gem in the heart of the Eternal City. The impressive semi-circular remains of this grand structure, built between 100 and... Read More

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Vatican Museums

The Vatican Museums house a comprehensive collection of artwork and historical pieces from throughout history.

The Vatican Museums (Musei Vaticani) house some of the most impressive and important historical artefacts and works of art in the world. Originally the site of the Vatican Museums was used for papal palaces, but they are now a series of galleries in Vatican City. From the exemplary collection of classical... Read More

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Via Appia Antica

Via Appia Antica, built in 312 BC, is one of the most important roads leading to Rome.

Via Appia Antica, also known as the Appian Way, is one of the oldest and most important roads leading to Rome. Built in 312 BC, it was slowly extended and, by 191 BC, it reached the port of Brindisi, over 550km southeast of the city (along the “heel” of Italy).... Read More

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Villa dei Quintili

An amazing historical site, Villa dei Quintili is an extremely well-preserved second century AD villa in Rome’s suburbs.

Villa dei Quintili, translated as the Villa of the Quintili, was one of the most lavish homes along the famous road that leads to Rome, the Via Appia. In 151 AD, the main part of the Villa dei Quintili was owned by the senior officials, the Quintili brothers. Consuls under the... Read More