Historic sites in Paris

If you’re looking to explore Historic Sites in Paris and the surrounding area then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s a fantastic selection of  Historic Sites in Paris and you can plan some great things to see on your trips by browsing our selection.

Once you’ve explored the  Historic Sites in Paris you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan out your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook and use it when visiting your favourite historical places in Paris.

Our database of historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other  Historic Sites in Paris, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our Explore page.


You can filter these historic places in Paris by date, historic period and famous figure by visiting our Paris historic sites search map

Paris: Site Index

Photo by Historvius

Arc de Triomphe

The Arc de Triomphe is an iconic Parisian landmark built in the 19th century to commemorate those who fought for France.

The Arc de Triomphe in Paris is a 162 foot monumental arch in the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle. It was commissioned by Napoleon in 1806, shortly following his victory at Austerlitz, with the aim of commemorating French soldiers, particularly those who fought in the Napoleonic Wars. The Arc... Read More

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Arenes de Lutece

Arenes de Lutece was an ancient Roman amphitheatre, the remains of which stand in Paris.

Arenes de Lutece or “Lutetia Arena” in Paris is one of the most important and rare remnants of the Gallo-Roman settlement of Lutetia. Lutetia or ‘Lutece’ was a settlement located on the site of what is now Paris. Originating in pre-Roman Gaul it then became a Roman city. Originally built in... Read More

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Avenue des Champs Elysees

The Avenue des Champs Elysees is a famous Parisian route dating back to the seventeenth century.

The Avenue des Champs Elysees is a central street in Paris first established in the 1660’s and in which many of the France’s national events are marked, including parades to celebrate the victories of each of the two World Wars. Today, Avenue des Champs Elysees is a focal point for both... Read More

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Basilica of St Denis

The Basilica of St Denis was the site where French monarchs were buried until the French Revolution.

The Basilica of St Denis (Basilique Saint-Denis) in Paris, France is a cathedral basilica named after France’s patron saint. In fact, the place where Basilica of St Denis stands is believed to the site where Saint Denis, also known as Saint Dionysius, was buried after his death in around 275... Read More

Chateau de Malmaison

Chateau de Malmaison is a country house near Paris which was once the home of Napoleon Bonaparte.

Chateau de Malmaison was the home of Napoleon Bonaparte and his first wife, Joséphine de Beauharnais, who bought it in 1799. Since then, Chateau de Malmaison served as the seat of government from 1800 to 1802 and then became Joséphine’s property in 1809 after the couple divorced. After serving as her... Read More

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Crypte Archeologique - Paris

The Crypte Archeologique is a subterranean museum housing the remains of Gallo-Roman Paris.

The Crypte Archeologique (Archaeological Crypt) in Notre Dame Square (Parvis) in Paris is an incredible site for those interested in the history of Paris. During the Gallo-Roman Period, Paris was known as Lutetia, which developed from the first and second centuries BC. The Crypte Archeologique contains the remains of Gallo-Roman Lutetia,... Read More

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La Conciergerie

La Conciergerie in Paris is a former palace turned prison which now serves as a museum and government building.

La Conciergerie in Paris, France is located on an important site which once formed the seat of the city’s Roman leaders during their occupation of Gaul. La Conciergerie itself originally formed part of thirteenth century Palais de Justice, the royal palace built by King Philip IV. It served this role... Read More

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Les Invalides

Les Invalides was originally built by Louis XIV as a hospital for ailing soldiers and is where Napoleon was laid to rest.

Les Invalides was originally built by the order of Louis XIV as a hospital and home for ailing soldiers. This order was given on 24 November 1670, the building designed by architect Liberal Bruant and Les Invalides was completed in 1676. In fact Les Invalides still operates as an institution... Read More

Musee d’Art et d’Histoire du Judaisme

Musee d’Art et d’Histoire du Judaisme explores the history of France’s Jewish community.

Musee d’Art et d’Histoire du Judaisme (Museum of Jewish Art and History) in Paris explores the history of the Jewish community in France’s capital and throughout Europe since medieval times. From historic objects to artwork, the Musee d’Art et d’Histoire du Judaisme has an extensive collection of pieces charting Jewish history.... Read More

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Musee de Cluny

Musee de Cluny houses Ancient Roman baths and the national medieval museum in Paris.

Musee de Cluny in Paris is steeped in both medieval and Ancient Roman history. Officially known as Musée National du Moyen Âge – the National Museum of the Middle Ages - Musee de Cluny has an impressive collection, including Roman statues, gothic sculptures, a treasury filled with the works of... Read More

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Musee du Louvre

Musee du Louvre is a twelfth century fort turned palace and today stands as one of the world’s foremost art museums.

Musee du Louvre, also known as, the Grand Louvre or just The Louvre, is one of the world’s foremost art museums, exhibiting over 35,000 works from around the globe and throughout history. The Louvre’s eight departments cover an extensive array of historical periods and artistic genres, each represented through the museum’s... Read More

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Notre Dame Cathedral of Paris

Notre Dame Cathedral is a gothic cathedral originally built in the 12th century in Paris.

Notre Dame Cathedral (Cathedrale de Notre Dame de Paris) is a gothic cathedral in Paris’s fourth arrondissement. Original construction began in 1163, with the first stone supposedly laid in the presence of Pope Alexander III. At this time, it was the project of the bishop of Paris, Maurice de Sully who... Read More

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Palace of Versailles

The Palace of Versailes was the residence of King Louis XIV and former seat of the French Government.

The Palace of Versailles was originally the hunting lodge of France’s King Louis XIII, but was transformed into a magnificent residence by his son and successor, Louis XIV. The ostentatious monarch built the Grand Apartment of the King and Queen which included the magnificent Hall of Mirrors before moving both his... Read More

Palais de Justice

The Palais de Justice is the main courthouse in Paris and which served as the court of the Revolutionary Tribunal.

The Palais de Justice in Île de la Cité in Paris is a vast and majestic gothic structure, the site of which was originally the home of governors of Ancient Rome. Palais de Justice then became the royal residence of the French monarchy such as Louis IX and remained as... Read More

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Pere Lachaise Cemetery

Père Lachaise Cemetery is the resting place of many of famous figures of French and other nationalities.

Pere Lachaise Cemetery (Cimetière du Père-Lachaise) was established by Napoleon I in 1804. Originally considered to be too far from the main city, Pere Lachaise Cemetery initially attracted few funerals, but following a marketing campaign and the transfer of the remains of French philosopher Pierre Abélard in 1817, its popularity... Read More

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Place de la Concorde

Place de la Concorde was where King Louis XVI and many others were executed during the French Revolution.

Place de la Concorde in Paris was the site where King Louis XVI was executed on 21 January 1793. During the French Revolution, Place de la Concorde was named Place de la Revolution. Prior to this, it had been known as Place Louis XV and had contained a statue of the... Read More

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Pont Neuf

Pont Neuf is the oldest bridge in Paris.

Pont Neuf in Paris dates back to the sixteenth century, making it the oldest bridge in the city. Work on Pont Neuf was started in 1578 by King Henry III and completed in 1607 by Henry IV.... Read More

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Remains of the Bastille

The remains of the Bastille prison can be viewed at Square Henri Galli in Paris.

Some remains of the Bastille, the state prison which was famously stormed thus sparking the French Revolution, can be seen in a small park known as Square Henri Galli in Paris. A small plaque next to what seems like an innocuous pile of stones marks this out as the remains... Read More

Saint-Sulpice Church

Saint-Sulpice Church is a large eighteenth century church in Paris.

Saint-Sulpice Church in Paris is one of the city’s largest churches, being only slightly smaller than Notre Dame Cathedral. Initial construction of Saint-Sulpice Church began in the mid-seventeenth century and took nearly a century to complete, finally consecrated in the name of Saint Sulpitius the Pious. There are various historic... Read More

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Sainte Chapelle

Sainte Chapelle is a stunning 13th Century gothic church and home to the oldest wall painting in Paris.

Sainte Chapelle or the “Holy Chapel” is a gothic church built by Saint Louis in Ile de la Cité in the centre of Paris. The construction of Sainte Chapelle began in 1246 under the orders of King Louis IX, and was carried out with the specific purpose of housing the relics... Read More

The Bastille

The Bastille was a prison stormed in 1789, sparking the French Revolution. It was later destroyed and its location is now marked by a monument.

The Bastille was a fourteenth century fortress turned prison in Paris which would become central in igniting the French Revolution. On 14 July 1789, a large group descended on the Bastille demanding that its prisoners – by now only seven were held there – be released. Their main aim was... Read More

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The Catacombs of Paris

The Paris Catacombs are underground quarries housing approximately six million human skeletons dating back to the 18th century.

The Catacombs of Paris (Les Catacombes de Paris) came into use as a burial place for Parisian bones in the eighteenth century following the overpopulation of Parisian cemeteries and the closure of the Cemetery of Innocents (Les Innocents). The Catacombs are underground quarries encompassing a portion of Paris’ old mines near... Read More

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The Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower in Paris is a giant iron monument completed in 1889 and one of the world’s most iconic landmarks.

The Eiffel Tower (Tour Eiffel) is an imposing iron monument on Paris’ Champ de Mars by the river Seine. The Eiffel Tower was built between 1887 and 1889 based on the design of engineer Gustave Eiffel, after whom the tower was named. In fact Eiffel’s design was chosen out of 107... Read More

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The Pantheon - Paris

The Pantheon in Paris is a neo-classical church which was completed in 1789. Its crypt interns many famous French figures.

The Pantheon in Paris (Le Pantheon), was built as a result of King Louis XV’s determination to create an edifice to the glory of St-Genèvieve, the patron saint of Paris. “The Pantheon” means “Every God” and construction began in 1758 with the intention that the building be a church. However, it... Read More