Historic sites in Mexico

If you’re looking to explore Historic Sites in Mexico and the surrounding area then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s a fantastic selection of  Historic Sites in Mexico and you can plan some great things to see on your trips by browsing our selection. Once you’ve explored the  Historic Sites in Mexico you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan out your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook.

Our database of historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other  Historic Sites in Mexico, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.
 

Mexico: Site Index

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Alhondiga de Granaditas

Alhondiga de Granaditas was the site of a rebel attack against the Spanish in the Mexican War of Independence.

Alhondiga de Granaditas in Guanajuato City in Mexico was originally built as a granary warehouse and marketplace between 1798 and 1809. However, at the start of the Mexican War of Independence this beautiful building became the site of a major clash between Spanish colonialists and Mexican rebels. In 1810 the priest... Read More

Angostura Battlefield

Angostura Battlefield marks the location of an important clash in the Mexican-American War, the Battle of Buena Vista.

Angostura Battlefield in Mexico is the location of an important clash in the Mexican-American War. The battle occurred on February 23, 1847 near the town of Angostura and saw an American army under the command of General Zachary Taylor hold off an attack from a larger Mexican force commanded by General... Read More

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Calixtlahuaca

Calixtlahuaca is an Aztec archaeological site near Toluca in Mexico.

Calixtlahuaca near Toluca in Mexico is a well-preserved Aztec archaeological site which was once a thriving city originally home to the Matlatzinca people – the people of the Toluca Valley. The Calixtlahuaca site has a series of fascinating and impressive structures, not least of which are its vast pyramid-like temples.... Read More

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Castillo de Chapultepec

Chapultepec Castle was once the home of Emperor Maximilian of Habsburg and now houses Mexico’s National History Museum

Chapultepec Castle (Castillo de Chapultepec) is an eighteenth century building in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Park now containing Mexico’s National History Museum (Museo Nacional de Historia). Original construction of Chapultepec Castle began in 1785, but it was only completed after Mexico achieved independence and later refurbished as the home of Emperor Maximilian... Read More

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Chacchoben

Chacchoben is a Maya site in Mexico housing some impressive pyramid temples.

Chacchoben is a Maya site in Mexico housing some impressive pyramid temples. The exact history of Chacchoben is unclear. Most sources date its pyramids to around 700AD (some say 300AD), although the Mayas are said to have been present at Chacchoben long before this, perhaps as early as 200BC. ... Read More

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Chichen Itza

Chichen Itza is a site made up of two impressive and well preserved cities, built by the Mayas and then captured by the Toltecs.

Stunningly well-preserved and imposingly beautiful, Chichen Itza is one of Mexico’s most impressive historical sites. A UNESCO World Heritage site based in the forests of the Yucatan Peninsula, Chichen Itza is actually made up of two cities built by two peoples, the Mayas and the Toltecs. The site is made up of... Read More

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Cobá

Cobá is an important and vast archaeological Maya site in Mexico’s Quintana Roo region.

Cobá in Quintana Roo in Mexico houses the remains of a once vast city that developed in around 632 AD and peaked between 800 and 1100 AD. Whilst it is thought that Cobá originally spanned a massive 60 square kilometres, the current archaeological site has yet to uncover all its... Read More

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Dzibilchaltun

Dzibilchaltun in Mexico is an archaeological site housing the ruins of a Maya settlement.

Dzibilchaltun in Yucatan, Mexico is one of the earliest of the series of Maya settlements along the Puuc Route - a trail of the Maya sites in the Puuc region in Yucatan. Thought to have been inhabited from around 500 BC, Dzibilchaltun – which is translated as “the site of stone... Read More

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Ek Balam

Ek Balam is a Maya site on the Yucatan Peninsula with some impressive ruins.

Ek Balam or Ek’ Balam is a Maya site on the Yucatan Peninsula with some impressive ruins. Translated either as Black Jaguar or Star Jaguar, Ek Balam is surrounded by a low, stone wall, an unusual feature in Mayan cities. Within this area are several restored pyramids and large temples... Read More

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El Tajin

El Tajin in Mexico was a city of the Totonac people and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

El Tajin in the state of Veracruz in Mexico is an impressive archaeological site which originally formed the capital city of the Totonac state. In fact, the name “Tajin” refers to the Totonac deity of thunder, lighting and rain. Today, it is a UNESCO World Heritage site and is open... Read More

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El Tepozteco

El Tepozteco is a small Aztec temple in Tepoztlan, Mexico.

El Tepozteco is an ancient Aztec temple hidden deep in the western part of Tepoztlan National Park, Mexico. El Tepozteco is a hilltop shrine to the Aztec deity Tepoztecatl made up of two rooms. Whilst not the most impressive site in Mexico by a long haul, it is a great stop... Read More

Ex-Convent de Churubusco

Ex-Convent de Churubusco was the site of a Mexican defeat in the Mexican-American War and now houses Mexico City’s National Museum of the Interventions.

The former Monastery of Churubusco, translated in Spanish as Ex-Convent de Churubusco, is a seventeenth century building and was the site of fierce battle between Mexican and American forces during the nineteenth century Mexican-American War. The battle, which took place on 20 August 1847, saw the Mexicans fighting to protect the... Read More

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Fort Loreto

Fort Loreto is an eighteenth century fortress and one of the sites where the famous Battle of Puebla was fought.

Fort Loreto (Fuerte de Loreto) is an eighteenth century fortress and one of the sites where the famous Battle of Puebla was fought. This battle, which took place on 5 May 1862, marked a great victory for the Mexicans over the invading French army. In fact, it is celebrated every... Read More

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Kabah

The ruins of Kabah are those of a Maya settlement in Yucatan, Mexico.

Kabah was a Maya settlement and is now an archaeological site in Mexico’s Yucatan state. Inhabited from the third century BC and, like nearby Uxmal, abandoned in circa 1200 AD, Kabah was mostly constructed from the seventh century and added to in the ninth century. It is thought that Kabah was... Read More

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Labna

Labna is a Maya site in Yucatan State in Mexico.

Labna is one of a series of former Maya settlements in Mexico’s Yucatan region and part of what is known as the Puuc Trail. Like the city of Uxmal, with which it is linked, Labna’s structures, such as its palace and its archway, are beautifully ornate. However, unlike its counterpart, Labna... Read More

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Merida Cathedral

Merida Cathedral in Mexico is the oldest one on the continent.

Merida Cathedral, known locally as Catedral de San Ildefonso, in Mexico is a sixteenth century cathedral built by Spanish colonialists. In fact, constructed from 1556 to 1598, Merida Cathedral was the first such cathedral to be built in the inland Americas. Not only was Merida Cathedral built on the site of the... Read More

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Mexico National Museum of Anthropology

The Mexico National Museum of Anthropology is one of the world’s best renowned museums of pre-Hispanic history.

The Mexico National Museum of Anthropology is a world renowned museum with a large array of archaeological and ethnographic exhibitions, mostly relating to the pre-Hispanic era. The Museum of Anthropology takes visitors through Mexico’s historic cultures, including the Toltecs, the Maya and the Aztecs. Some of the National Museum of Anthropology’s... Read More

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Mitla

Mitla was a Zapotec religious centre later taken over by the Mixtecs in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Mitla was a Zapotec and later a Mixtec settlement in what is now the modern town of San Pablo Villa de Mitla in Oaxaca in Mexico. Thought to have first been inhabited by the Zapotecs in around 600 BC, Mitla evolved into an important ceremonial centre. It was later taken... Read More

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Monte Alban

Monte Alban is a remarkable UNESCO listed pre-Columbian site in Mexico.

Monte Alban in Oaxaca in Mexico is an impressive ancient site created by an incredible feat which involved carving a flat space out of a mountain rising to an elevation of over 1,600 feet above the valley below it. Monte Alban was inhabited for approximately 1,500 years by a succession... Read More

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Museo Casa de Hidalgo

This museum in the town of Dolores Hidalgo is the former house of the priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, the father of the Independence movement in Mexico.

Museo Casa de Hidalgo, which is housed in a large late eighteenth-century building, was the dwelling place of Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla. The Creole priest, who lived in the town of Dolores in the early nineteenth century, is widely viewed as the ‘Father of Independence’ in Mexico. The house... Read More

Museo Regional de Oaxaca

Museo Regional de Oaxaca houses many of the pre-Columbian finds from nearby Monte Alban.

Museo Regional de Oaxaca - sometimes known as the Museum of Oaxacan Culture - is this Mexican city’s main museum, chronicling the history of the state of Oaxaca (the state and the city have the same name). However, the main exhibit at Museo Regional de Oaxaca is its collection of... Read More

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Palenque

Palenque in Mexico is a UNESCO listed Maya archaeological site of a city which thrived between 500 and 700 AD.

Palenque in Mexico is an important Maya archaeological site located just outside the modern city by the same name. It is thought that Palenque was first inhabited in around 100BC and excavations have uncovered writings about a king who ruled there in the fifth century AD, however the city was... Read More

Piramide de Cuicuilco

Cuicuilco is a Mesoamerican archeological site in Mexico City, believed to have been a large, ceremonial city that existed prior to the foundation of Teotihuacan.

Cuicuilco is an ancient archeological site and museum next to Mexico City’s Lake Texcoco which includes the striking Piramide de Cuicuilco. Dating back to the Mesoamerican era perhaps as far as 800 BC, Cuicuilco is thought to be one of Mexico’s oldest sites. At its peak, Cuicuilco is believed to... Read More

San Augustin

The Temple of Saint Augustin is a sixteenth century monastery in Acolman in Mexico

The Temple of Saint Augustin, known as Templo y Ex-Convento de San Agustin, is a sixteenth century historic church in the village of Acolman in Mexico. Constructed by Augustinian friars between 1539 and 1560, San Agustin is a great example of sixteenth century architecture, particularly its façade, which exhibits a plateresque-style... Read More

San Juan de Ulua

San Juan de Ulua is a sixteenth century Spanish fort which defended the port of Veracruz in Mexico.

San Juan de Ulua is a sixteenth century fortress in Veracruz in Mexico. Constructed in 1565, during the Spanish Colonial period, San Juan de Ulua was built in order to protect the country’s most vital port, Veracruz. The Spanish used Veracruz to import and house many Spanish treasures and, as... Read More

Sayil

Sayil in Mexico houses the ruins of a small Maya settlement built in the Puuc style.

Sayil in Yucatan in Mexico is a small archaeological site of Maya ruins built in the traditional Puuc style. Quieter than the larger sites in the area such as Uxmal, Sayil offers a good place to see Maya structures such as its impressive palace and El Mirador temple, although there is... Read More

Templo Mayor

Templo Mayor was a holy temple in the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan, now modern day Mexico City.

Templo Mayor was a temple in the capital city of the Aztecs, Tenochtitlan, in what is now Mexico City. In fact, much of Mexico City was built over Tenochtitlan, but some original sites remain, including the Great Temple, known as Templo Mayor, which was the most important building in the... Read More

Tenochtitlan

Tenochtitlan was the Aztec capital, established in 1325AD and destroyed by the Spanish in the 16th century.

Tenochtitlan in Mexico was established on an island in Lake Texcoco in 1325 AD as the capital city of the Aztecs and, in its final and most prosperous days, was ruled by Motecuhzoma II, also known as Montezuma. At its peak, Tenochtitlan was a thriving and imposing city with around 200,000... Read More

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Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan is a well preserved ancient Mesoamerican city near Mexico City.

Teotihuacan was a holy Mesoamerican city built in around 400 BC in what is now Mexico and forms one of the country’s oldest archeological sites. Whilst the founders of Teotihuacan have never been definitively identified, it is thought that the city was inhabited by the Toltecs and was also an... Read More

The National Palace of Mexico

The National Palace of Mexico is an important landmark representing Mexico’s independence.

The National Palace of Mexico, or Palacio Nacional, was originally constructed in 1692 on a site which has been central to Mexico’s governance since Aztec times. It became the National Palace in 1821, following the Mexican War of Independence, and houses the bell rung by the priest and original leader... Read More

Tulum

Tulum is a cliff-top Maya site in Mexico’s Quintana Roo region with some interesting and quite well preserved ruins.

Tulum is a Maya site in Mexico’s Quintana Roo region dating back to between the 13th and 16th centuries. At its peak, Tulum was quite a thriving walled city. Whilst relatively modest in comparison to, say Chichen Itza, Tulum does feature some interesting and quite well preserved ruins, including its castle,... Read More

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Uxmal

Uxmal was a Maya city in Yucatan, Mexico and is today a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Uxmal is an archaeological site in Mexico which houses the ruins of a Maya town thought to have been inhabited as early as 800BC. Having said this, most of the buildings and structures seen at Uxmal today were constructed in between around 700AD to 1000AD. A thriving city and a religious... Read More

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Xcaret

Xcaret houses the ruins of a Maya city which reached its peak in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Xcaret houses the ruins of a Maya city which reached its peak in the 15th and 16th centuries. Located in Mexico’s Quintana Roo region, Xcaret was then known as Ppole and is said to have been of great ceremonial importance, as evidenced by its wealth of temples, homes and monuments.... Read More

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Xlapak

Xlapak is a small archaeological site in Mexico’s Yucatan region.

Xlapak is one of the smaller of the archaeological sites along the Puuc Trail in the Yucatan State in Mexico, a trail of Maya sites in the hilly part of this otherwise flat state. The main structure at Xlapak is a small palace which is adorned with carvings of the rain... Read More

Xochicalco

Xochicalco is an important pre-Columbian site in Mexico and a World Heritage site.

Xochicalco is an important pre-Columbian site in Mexico, listed by UNESCO for its well-preserved ruins dating from an important period in Mesoamerican history. At Xochicalco’s peak between 650AD and 900AD - during the Epiclassic period - the Mesoamerican world was in great flux, with places like Tikal, Teotihuacan and... Read More

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Yagul

Yagul was a fortified Zapotec settlement in Oaxaca in Mexico.

Yagul is an archaeological site in Mexico’s Oaxaca region inhabited by the Pre-Columbian civilisation of the Zapotecs, although the exact time of their first occupation of this area is unknown (sometime between 500 and 100 BC). Yagul was still in use at the time of the Spanish Conquest. Somewhat dwarfed by... Read More