Historic sites in Mexico

If you’re looking to explore Historic Sites in Mexico and the surrounding area then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s a fantastic selection of  Historic Sites in Mexico and you can plan some great things to see on your trips by browsing our selection. Once you’ve explored the  Historic Sites in Mexico you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan out your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook.

Our database of historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other  Historic Sites in Mexico, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.
 

Mexico: Site Index

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Alhondiga de Granaditas

Alhondiga de Granaditas was the site of a rebel attack against the Spanish in the Mexican War of Independence.

DID YOU KNOW?

Alhondiga de Granaditas in Guanajuato City in Mexico was originally built as a granary warehouse and marketplace between 1798 and 1809. However, at the start of the Mexican War of Independence this beautiful building became the site of a major clash between Spanish colonialists and Mexican rebels.

In 1810 the priest and leader of the revolution, Miguel Hidalgo, led a campaign to capture Guanajuato City. At that time, the Spanish began using Alhondiga de Granaditas as a fortress in which to shelter, an action which initially proved quite effective. However, Hidalgo then ordered a miner called Juan José de los Reyes Martínez, known as ‘El Pípila’ to set Alhondiga de Granaditas on fire. After strapping a slab to his back for protection from enemy fire, El Pípila did just that. The result was the massacre of those inside Alhondiga de Granaditas and doubt by some as to whether to continue with the fight for independence.

The Mexicans managed to take Guanajuato City, but by the following year the Spanish had recaptured it and exacted revenge on the rebels. Four of the movement’s main leaders, namely Hidalgo, Juan Aldama, Mariano Jimenez and Ignacio Allende were beheaded and their heads displayed on the walls of Alhondiga de Granaditas. The message was clear –rebellion would not be tolerated.

In the nineteenth century, Alhondiga de Granaditas became a prison and today houses a museum, Museo Regional La Alhóndiga de Granaditas. The museum contains colonial exhibits and those about the Mexican struggle for independence as well as some about the pre-Colombian era. It also houses numerous pieces of art.

This fascinating site features as one of our Top Ten Tourist Attractions of Mexico.

Angostura Battlefield

Angostura Battlefield marks the location of an important clash in the Mexican-American War, the Battle of Buena Vista.

DID YOU KNOW?

Angostura Battlefield in Mexico is the location of an important clash in the Mexican-American War.

The battle occurred on February 23, 1847 near the town of Angostura and saw an American army under the command of General Zachary Taylor hold off an attack from a larger Mexican force commanded by General Antonio López de Santa Anna. The encounter was called "The Battle of Buena Vista" by the Americans and "La Batalla de Angostura" by the Mexicans.

Today a small memorial marking this important battle can be seen just off the main road in Angostura. There is also a museum dedicated to the battle in nearby Saltillo.

Photo by liberalmind1012 (cc)

Calixtlahuaca

Calixtlahuaca is an Aztec archaeological site near Toluca in Mexico.

DID YOU KNOW?

Calixtlahuaca near Toluca in Mexico is a well-preserved Aztec archaeological site which was once a thriving city originally home to the Matlatzinca people – the people of the Toluca Valley. The Calixtlahuaca site has a series of fascinating and impressive structures, not least of which are its vast pyramid-like temples.

Photo by paulinaclemente (cc)

Castillo de Chapultepec

Chapultepec Castle was once the home of Emperor Maximilian of Habsburg and now houses Mexico’s National History Museum

DID YOU KNOW?

Chapultepec Castle (Castillo de Chapultepec) is an eighteenth century building in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Park now containing Mexico’s National History Museum (Museo Nacional de Historia).

Original construction of Chapultepec Castle began in 1785, but it was only completed after Mexico achieved independence and later refurbished as the home of Emperor Maximilian of Habsburg in 1864, before becoming the residence of Mexico’s presidents. Parts of Chapultepec Castle are still dedicated to their time as Emperor Maximilian’s home, however today, most of Chapultepec Castle is dedicated to the National History Museum.

Within its twelve halls, Mexico’s National History Museum charts the country’s diverse history, from the Pre-Hispanic era through to Spanish colonialism, Mexico’s revolution and its independence. Some of the National History Museum’s most significant exhibitions include the sword wielded by independence fighter José María Morelos in the Siege of Cuautla in 1812 as well as several murals depicting famous battles.

Chapultepec Castle features as one of our Top 10 Mexican Tourist Attractions.

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Chacchoben

Chacchoben is a Maya site in Mexico housing some impressive pyramid temples.

DID YOU KNOW?

Chacchoben is a Maya site in Mexico housing some impressive pyramid temples.

The exact history of Chacchoben is unclear. Most sources date its pyramids to around 700AD (some say 300AD), although the Mayas are said to have been present at Chacchoben long before this, perhaps as early as 200BC.

Chacchoben is quite a popular tourist site, with several tour companies operating here.

Photo by Historvius

Chichen Itza

Chichen Itza is a site made up of two impressive and well preserved cities, built by the Mayas and then captured by the Toltecs.

DID YOU KNOW?

Stunningly well-preserved and imposingly beautiful, Chichen Itza is one of Mexico’s most impressive historical sites.

A UNESCO World Heritage site based in the forests of the Yucatan Peninsula, Chichen Itza is actually made up of two cities built by two peoples, the Mayas and the Toltecs.

The site is made up of several surviving buildings including a circular observatory known as El Caracol, the Warriors’ Temple and El Castillo. Accounts vary as to the date of the first settlement at Chichen Itza, placing it between the 6th and 9th century AD when the Mayas built the original city including “The Building of the Nuns” and a church.

Chichen Itza was conquered by the Toltec King of Tula in the 10th century AD, accounting for the fusion in Maya and Toltec influences.

Chichen Itza also features as one of our Top 10 Tourist Attractions in Mexico.

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Cobá

Cobá is an important and vast archaeological Maya site in Mexico’s Quintana Roo region.

DID YOU KNOW?

Cobá in Quintana Roo in Mexico houses the remains of a once vast city that developed in around 632 AD and peaked between 800 and 1100 AD. Whilst it is thought that Cobá originally spanned a massive 60 square kilometres, the current archaeological site has yet to uncover all its remains. What can be viewed is spread into four sections, named Grupo Cobá, Chumuc Mul, Macanxoc and Nohoch Mul.

Grupo Cobá contains a large holy pyramid called the Temple of the Church, translated as “La Iglesia”. Nearby, along a worn path is a playing field used to play ball games, signposted as “juego de pelota”.

The most impressive site at Cobá is its Great Pyramid, also known as the Nohoch Mul Pyramid. Rising to a height of 138 feet, the Great Pyramid is the second tallest of all Maya pyramids in the region after Estructura II at Calakmul. Climbing the steep stairs of this pyramid can be daunting, but the views are great.

Photo by GOC53 (cc)

Dzibilchaltun

Dzibilchaltun in Mexico is an archaeological site housing the ruins of a Maya settlement.

DID YOU KNOW?

Dzibilchaltun in Yucatan, Mexico is one of the earliest of the series of Maya settlements along the Puuc Route - a trail of the Maya sites in the Puuc region in Yucatan.

Thought to have been inhabited from around 500 BC, Dzibilchaltun – which is translated as “the site of stone writing” - is not as big as its counterpart, Uxmal, but does house several interesting buildings. In fact, in its heyday, Dzibilchaltun may have been vast and have even rivalled Uxmal in terms of its size, although comparatively little is left now.

One of the main sites at Dzibilchaltun is the Temple of the Seven Dolls. This holy building is also known as the Temple of the Sun, as it is perfectly located for viewing the equinox – this was almost certainly purposefully achieved by design and demonstrates the advanced nature of the Maya understanding of astronomy.

One great aspect which Dzibilchaltun has and which other Maya sites do not is its natural pool or “Cenote”. Excavations of this pool have uncovered many archaeological finds, but today it is most well-known for being a popular swimming venue.

Photo by archer10 (Dennis) (cc)

Ek Balam

Ek Balam is a Maya site on the Yucatan Peninsula with some impressive ruins.

DID YOU KNOW?

Ek Balam or Ek’ Balam is a Maya site on the Yucatan Peninsula with some impressive ruins. Translated either as Black Jaguar or Star Jaguar, Ek Balam is surrounded by a low, stone wall, an unusual feature in Mayan cities. Within this area are several restored pyramids and large temples as well as a ball court.

Ek Balam also features five sacbe, white roads or causeways, leading from the central area. El Torre, the tower, is one of the largest of Mayan buildings. The site’s vast main pyramid rises to a height of almost 100 feet, making it a remarkable example of Maya engineering.

Photo by Ixtla (cc)

El Tajin

El Tajin in Mexico was a city of the Totonac people and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

DID YOU KNOW?

El Tajin in the state of Veracruz in Mexico is an impressive archaeological site which originally formed the capital city of the Totonac state. In fact, the name “Tajin” refers to the Totonac deity of thunder, lighting and rain. Today, it is a UNESCO World Heritage site and is open to the public, although much of it is yet to be excavated.

El Tajin was founded following the abandonment of the city of Teotihuacan. Built and inhabited from 800AD to 1200 AD, El Tajin was a thriving city of major ceremonial importance, a fact illustrated by the numerous Mesoamerican pyramids and other ceremonial structures still seen there today.

Despite the fact that it is thought to have been greatly damaged and subsequently abandoned following an attack by the Chichimecs in the thirteenth century, much of El Tajin is extremely well-preserved offering a great many things to see. Amongst the most famous attractions at El Tajin is the Pyramid of the Niches, an incredibly impressive six-stepped pyramid which would once have been crowned with a temple. Stone reliefs and friezes around the site offer an insight into the lives of those who lived in El Tajin.

A particular pastime for which the city was renowned in its time was ball games, as depicted in numerous reliefs. In an ominous twist, the reliefs also seem to show that these ball games were related to human sacrifices which took place at El Tajin.

El Tajin has an interesting, albeit small museum with explanations in English, Spanish and also – fittingly – in the Totonac language. A visit to the whole site lasts around 2 hours.

Photo by -Chupacabras- (cc)

El Tepozteco

El Tepozteco is a small Aztec temple in Tepoztlan, Mexico.

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El Tepozteco is an ancient Aztec temple hidden deep in the western part of Tepoztlan National Park, Mexico. El Tepozteco is a hilltop shrine to the Aztec deity Tepoztecatl made up of two rooms.

Whilst not the most impressive site in Mexico by a long haul, it is a great stop on a hike through the park. Getting to El Tepozteco can be tricky and involves some hiking, although the scenery is beautiful.

Ex-Convent de Churubusco

Ex-Convent de Churubusco was the site of a Mexican defeat in the Mexican-American War and now houses Mexico City’s National Museum of the Interventions.

DID YOU KNOW?

The former Monastery of Churubusco, translated in Spanish as Ex-Convent de Churubusco, is a seventeenth century building and was the site of fierce battle between Mexican and American forces during the nineteenth century Mexican-American War.

The battle, which took place on 20 August 1847, saw the Mexicans fighting to protect the Monastery of Churubusco from US troops. However, the Americans emerged victorious, taking Ex-Convent de Churubusco and eventually conquering Mexico City. Fittingly, Ex-Convent de Churubusco today houses the city’s National Museum of the Interventions, dedicated to exploring the history of foreign intervention in Mexico.

The Ex-Convent de Churubusco museum deals mostly with nineteenth century conflicts, including the French occupation of the 1860’s and the Mexican-American War. The Monastery of Churubusco provides a beautiful backdrop, with many of its rooms having been restored and its gardens adding a serene dimension to the experience. Unfortunately for English speaking visitors, there is no translation on any of the exhibits.

Photo by RussBowling (cc)

Fort Loreto

Fort Loreto is an eighteenth century fortress and one of the sites where the famous Battle of Puebla was fought.

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Fort Loreto (Fuerte de Loreto) is an eighteenth century fortress and one of the sites where the famous Battle of Puebla was fought. This battle, which took place on 5 May 1862, marked a great victory for the Mexicans over the invading French army. In fact, it is celebrated every year with the festival of Cinco de Mayo (Fifth of May), often mistaken for Mexico’s Independence Day.

Since 1972, Fort Loreto has served as the Museum of Non-Intervention. It explores Mexico’s history under the French. Amongst other things, the museums looks at the Battle of Puebla, displaying letters, paintings, flags and documents as well as weaponry and uniforms from the time. It goes on to explore the premiership of Benito Juarez, Mexico’s first president.

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Kabah

The ruins of Kabah are those of a Maya settlement in Yucatan, Mexico.

DID YOU KNOW?

Kabah was a Maya settlement and is now an archaeological site in Mexico’s Yucatan state. Inhabited from the third century BC and, like nearby Uxmal, abandoned in circa 1200 AD, Kabah was mostly constructed from the seventh century and added to in the ninth century.

It is thought that Kabah was linked to the site of Uxmal – indeed the two are connected by a road - and, whilst it does not boast the grandeur of this larger settlement, Kabah’s ruins are interesting in their own right.

One of Kabah’s most impressive sites is its Temple of the Masks, so called for its many depictions of the rain g-d, Chaac, who is also a central figure in Uxmal. Note that it is best to ask before considering climbing any of the monuments as many of the sites may not be walked on.

Photo by Olivier Bruchez (cc)

Labna

Labna is a Maya site in Yucatan State in Mexico.

DID YOU KNOW?

Labna is one of a series of former Maya settlements in Mexico’s Yucatan region and part of what is known as the Puuc Trail.

Like the city of Uxmal, with which it is linked, Labna’s structures, such as its palace and its archway, are beautifully ornate. However, unlike its counterpart, Labna is quite small and most people visit it as part as an overall tour of the sites in the area.

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Merida Cathedral

Merida Cathedral in Mexico is the oldest one on the continent.

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Merida Cathedral, known locally as Catedral de San Ildefonso, in Mexico is a sixteenth century cathedral built by Spanish colonialists.

In fact, constructed from 1556 to 1598, Merida Cathedral was the first such cathedral to be built in the inland Americas.

Not only was Merida Cathedral built on the site of the former Maya city of Tiho, it was also constructed from the stones of Maya pyramids.

Photo by gripso_banana_prune (cc)

Mexico National Museum of Anthropology

The Mexico National Museum of Anthropology is one of the world’s best renowned museums of pre-Hispanic history.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Mexico National Museum of Anthropology is a world renowned museum with a large array of archaeological and ethnographic exhibitions, mostly relating to the pre-Hispanic era.

The Museum of Anthropology takes visitors through Mexico’s historic cultures, including the Toltecs, the Maya and the Aztecs.

Some of the National Museum of Anthropology’s most famous exhibits include the jade mask of Zapotec Bat God and the Piedra del Sol or Aztec sun stone excavated from Zocalo. It also holds original pieces found in Chichen Itza.

The museum is quite large and too much to take in during the course of a single visit, but it is well organized, allowing history enthusiasts to explore it according to eras. Guided tours also offer a great way to explore the museum and are offered in Spanish, English and French, Tuesday to Saturday from 9:30 to 17:30.

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Mitla

Mitla was a Zapotec religious centre later taken over by the Mixtecs in Oaxaca, Mexico.

DID YOU KNOW?

Mitla was a Zapotec and later a Mixtec settlement in what is now the modern town of San Pablo Villa de Mitla in Oaxaca in Mexico.

Thought to have first been inhabited by the Zapotecs in around 600 BC, Mitla evolved into an important ceremonial centre. It was later taken over by the Mixtecs in approximately 1000 AD and was still a thriving city at the time the Spanish arrived.

Mitla’s archaeological ruins are dotted around the modern town and divided into five units. The Church Group, which is the one pinpointed on the map, is near the main entrance to the site and close to the sixteenth century Church of San Pedro. This is one of the better excavated parts of Mitla.

Beyond this group of sites are four others, namely the Adobe Group, the Arroyo Group, the South Group and the Columns group. The Columns Group is often called the Palace group for its series of palace buildings.

One of the most impressive aspects of Mitla is the way in which its structures are decorated. Each adorned with elaborate carvings, these works of art distinguish Mitla from other Zapotec and Mixtec sites. It is also unusual that most of the carvings at Mitla are abstract rather than of people or animals.

There is a small museum at Mitla which exhibits several finds from the site.

Photo by RussBowling (cc)

Monte Alban

Monte Alban is a remarkable UNESCO listed pre-Columbian site in Mexico.

DID YOU KNOW?

Monte Alban in Oaxaca in Mexico is an impressive ancient site created by an incredible feat which involved carving a flat space out of a mountain rising to an elevation of over 1,600 feet above the valley below it.

Monte Alban was inhabited for approximately 1,500 years by a succession of civilisations, including the Olmecs, Zapotecs and Mixtecs and, at its peak, had a population of around 25,000 people.

The earliest inhabitants of Monte Alban were the Olmecs, who are credited with the over 140 carved stones known as the monument of Los Danzantes, depicting mutilated figures. There has been much debate over what these figures represent. ‘Los Danzantes’ means dancers, but it has since been posited that these were actually war prisoners.

However, whilst Olmec contributions remain, most of the structures found at Monte Alban today were built by the Zapotecs, who are thought to have arrived between 800 BC and 500 BC. Construction continued over the centuries and was later influenced by the culture of Teotihuacan.

Monte Alban is characterised by over 2,200 terraces as well as numerous pyramid structures, large staircases, ornate palaces, elaborate tombs and even a ball court known as Juego de Pelota, mostly arranged on its “Grand Plaza”. The ball court is very well-preserved, made up of two facing stepped platforms with the playing field in the centre. The ball games played were ritualistic and often ended in the death of the losers.

In approximately 800 AD, the Zapotecs were threatened by the Mixtecs and fortified Monte Alban before being driven out. The Mixtecs took over the site and, in around 1400 AD, started burying their leaders in the Zapotec tombs. Whilst many of these ornately decorated tombs were looted, vast riches were found in one particular tomb – Tomb 7 – which can now been seen at Museo Regional de Oaxaca. Some tombs are open to visitors, although this is sporadic.

Today, Monte Alban is a popular tourist destination and a UNESCO World Heritage site. It has a small on-site museum showing some of the finds from excavations of Monte Alban. Monte Alban features as one of our Top Tourist Attractions in Mexico.

Photo by Historvius

Museo Casa de Hidalgo

This museum in the town of Dolores Hidalgo is the former house of the priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, the father of the Independence movement in Mexico.

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Women and Independence in Latin AmericaMuseo Casa de Hidalgo, which is housed in a large late eighteenth-century building, was the dwelling place of Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla. The Creole priest, who lived in the town of Dolores in the early nineteenth century, is widely viewed as the ‘Father of Independence’ in Mexico. The house has now been turned into a museum devoted to his life.

In 1810, Hidalgo y Costilla was living in the small parish of Dolores. The priest had been rector of the prestigious college of San Nicolás in Valladolid (now Morelia), but he had had fallen foul of the Royal authorities, both for his interest in Enlightenment ideas and due to his distinctly non-celibate personal life. Hidalgo y Costilla, who lived openly with the mother of his two children, was subsequently assigned by his bishop to Dolores near Querétaro, where he worked among Indians and mestizos (people of mixed Indian and Spanish origin).

In 1810, in the wake of Napoleon’s invasion of Spain and the fragmentation of Royal authority across Spanish America, Hidalgo y Costilla joined a conspiracy of wealthy creoles to set up a revolutionary junta.

On the night of 15 September 1810, he and some of his fellow conspirators, warned by messengers from Querétaro that their intention to raise a rebellion against the Spanish had been discovered, decided to bring the plan forward. At dawn on 16 September, Hidalgo, tolling the church bell, addressed his parishioners from the church balcony, calling for a general uprising against the Spanish. His speech ended in the ‘Grito de Independencia’ (Cry of Independence): ‘¡Méxicanos, Viva Mexico!’ (Mexicans! Long live Mexico!). He issued his cry in the name of Fernando VII (the Spanish monarch deposed by Napoleon) and the Virgin of Guadalupe.

Hidalgo’s Independence rebellion, whose goals included the abolition of the Indian tribute, was markedly different from other risings across Spanish America because it came from outside the Creole elite. Although he was executed by the Royalists in March 1811, before Mexican Independence from Spain became a reality, he now occupies a legendary position in the Mexican collective imagination. At midnight on 15 September, his cry is repeated every year by the president in Mexico City and by politicians all over the country, as the starting point for Independence Day celebrations; 16 September also remains the one day of the year when the bell in Dolores Hidalgo´s parish church is rung.

Among then museum’s exhibits are numerous written tributes from different writers and groups to Mexico’s ‘Father of Independence’. The museum also contains copies of correspondence written, sent and received by Hidalgo, including the priest’s letter of excommunication from the Inquisition, which was issued less than a month after he uttered his ‘Cry of Independence’. Visitors can also see Hidalgo’s priestly cassocks, a banner of the Virgin of Guadalupe, and the first declaration of the abolition of slavery.

The museum is just a short walk from the Museo de la Independencia Nacional (Museum of National Independence) which contains artefacts and murals related to the era of the Independence struggle. This fascinating site features as one of our Top Ten Tourist Attractions of Mexico.

Museo Regional de Oaxaca

Museo Regional de Oaxaca houses many of the pre-Columbian finds from nearby Monte Alban.

DID YOU KNOW?

Museo Regional de Oaxaca - sometimes known as the Museum of Oaxacan Culture - is this Mexican city’s main museum, chronicling the history of the state of Oaxaca (the state and the city have the same name). However, the main exhibit at Museo Regional de Oaxaca is its collection of finds from Monte Alban.

Monte Alban is a nearby archaeological area and one of Mexico’s most impressive pre-Columbian historic sites. The collection at Museo Regional de Oaxaca is made up of the incredible finds from Monte Alban’s Tomb 7.

Tomb 7 was a Zapotec burial site later used by the Mixtecs to bury their leaders. When it was excavated in the early thirties, archaeologists found tens of corpses together with a wealth of beautiful jewellery, all of which is now displayed at Museo Regional de Oaxaca. English audio guides are available for a fee.

Photo by Historvius

Palenque

Palenque in Mexico is a UNESCO listed Maya archaeological site of a city which thrived between 500 and 700 AD.

DID YOU KNOW?

Palenque in Mexico is an important Maya archaeological site located just outside the modern city by the same name. It is thought that Palenque was first inhabited in around 100BC and excavations have uncovered writings about a king who ruled there in the fifth century AD, however the city was attacked several times by the inhabitants of neighbouring cities.

Pakal the Great
It was from the seventh century AD that Palenque began to develop once more under the rule of Pakal the Great (sometimes spelt “Pacal”). During his reign between 615 and 683 AD, Pakal built many of Palenque’s most impressive structures and they are often considered to be some of the most important pieces of Maya architecture. Pakal’s works were continued by his son, Kan B’alam.

Abandonment of Palenque
In approximately 711 AD, Palenque was attacked once more and, by 900 AD it was deserted. Having been discovered in the sixteenth century, Palenque is now a popular tourist destination and a UNESCO World Heritage site. It has a small, but interesting museum, exhibiting finds from the excavation of Palenque and giving an overview of its history.

Sites
Some of the most fascinating sites in Palenque include Pakal’s tomb, known as the Temple of the Inscriptions or “Templo de las Inscripciones”, the Palace (El Palacio) and several other temples, such as the Temple of the Sun (Los Templo del Sol) and the Temple of the Cross (Los Templo de la Cruz). Many of these temples centre off Palenque’s central plaza, a marvel in its own right as it was built over the river, requiring advanced engineering mechanisms.

Each of the structures in Palenque is ornate and lavishly decorated, bearing inscriptions chronicling the history of the city, which was probably the capital of the region. In fact, Palenque has the honour of having one of the best Maya inscriptions ever found, located in the Temple of the Inscriptions and telling the story of Palenque.

Palenque  features as one of our Top Ten Mexican Tourist Attractions.

Piramide de Cuicuilco

Cuicuilco is a Mesoamerican archeological site in Mexico City, believed to have been a large, ceremonial city that existed prior to the foundation of Teotihuacan.

DID YOU KNOW?

Cuicuilco is an ancient archeological site and museum next to Mexico City’s Lake Texcoco which includes the striking Piramide de Cuicuilco.

Dating back to the Mesoamerican era perhaps as far as 800 BC, Cuicuilco is thought to be one of Mexico’s oldest sites. At its peak, Cuicuilco is believed to have had a population of between 20,000 and 40,000 people.

Cuicuilco is comprised of numerous ruins, including a 23 metre high, five-level, circular pyramid (the Piramide de Cuicuilco) thought to be of religious and cosmic significance. Whilst originally built as a farming community, Cuicuilco later developed into a ceremonial city, maybe even the predecessor of Teotihuacan, as evidenced by its relatively well-preserved remains, which include both residential and religious structures.

The ruins of an old water drainage system are also present, demonstrating the relative sophistication of Cuicuilco’s inhabitants.

Cuicuilco was finally abandoned sometime between 150 and 200 AD, after the eruption of the nearby Xitle volcano. Some archaeologists think that the residents of Cuicuilco and other surrounding areas all later moved to Teotihuacan.

San Augustin

The Temple of Saint Augustin is a sixteenth century monastery in Acolman in Mexico

DID YOU KNOW?

The Temple of Saint Augustin, known as Templo y Ex-Convento de San Agustin, is a sixteenth century historic church in the village of Acolman in Mexico.

Constructed by Augustinian friars between 1539 and 1560, San Agustin is a great example of sixteenth century architecture, particularly its façade, which exhibits a plateresque-style and its beautiful atrium.

Now a museum featuring paintings and artifacts, this is a good excursion if you’re visiting the nearby site of Teotihuacan.

San Juan de Ulua

San Juan de Ulua is a sixteenth century Spanish fort which defended the port of Veracruz in Mexico.

DID YOU KNOW?

San Juan de Ulua is a sixteenth century fortress in Veracruz in Mexico. Constructed in 1565, during the Spanish Colonial period, San Juan de Ulua was built in order to protect the country’s most vital port, Veracruz.

The Spanish used Veracruz to import and house many Spanish treasures and, as such, San Juan de Ulua was built to the highest specifications, with 3-foot thick stone walls and an imposing 250 cannons.

In 1568, San Juan de Ulua was put to the test as an English fleet carrying slaves tried to dock at Veracruz. Although a shaky truce was in place between Spain and England, a battle broke out, known as the Battle of San Juan de Ulúa, and the English were defeated, losing most of their five ships. In fact, so formidable was San Juan de Ulua that the Spanish would hold on to it throughout the Mexican War of Independence and until 1825, four years after Mexico became independent.

In 1848, during the Mexican-American War, the US did manage to overcome the defences of San Juan de Ulua, capturing Veracruz. The fortress was heavily damaged by this attack. San Juan de Ulua then went on to become a nineteenth century prison, becoming the home of some of Mexico’s most notorious criminals.

Today, San Juan de Ulua is open to the public, who can tour its defences and prison cells. Guides are available in Spanish and English.

Sayil

Sayil in Mexico houses the ruins of a small Maya settlement built in the Puuc style.

DID YOU KNOW?

Sayil in Yucatan in Mexico is a small archaeological site of Maya ruins built in the traditional Puuc style.

Quieter than the larger sites in the area such as Uxmal, Sayil offers a good place to see Maya structures such as its impressive palace and El Mirador temple, although there is less to see here than at some of the more famous sites.

Templo Mayor

Templo Mayor was a holy temple in the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan, now modern day Mexico City.

DID YOU KNOW?

Templo Mayor was a temple in the capital city of the Aztecs, Tenochtitlan, in what is now Mexico City.

In fact, much of Mexico City was built over Tenochtitlan, but some original sites remain, including the Great Temple, known as Templo Mayor, which was the most important building in the city.

Temple Mayor was built by the people of Tenochtitlan as a shrine to the deities Huitzilopochtli and Tlaloc. Tenochtitlan was originally established in around 325 AD and was a thriving city with around 200,000 people until 1521, when it was conquered by the Spanish.

Templo Mayor is now a popular tourist site, with a museum filled with Aztec artefacts uncovered during the excavation. Overall the Templo Mayor and its museum offer a great insight in the pre-Hispanic era in Mexico.

Tenochtitlan

Tenochtitlan was the Aztec capital, established in 1325AD and destroyed by the Spanish in the 16th century.

DID YOU KNOW?

Tenochtitlan in Mexico was established on an island in Lake Texcoco in 1325 AD as the capital city of the Aztecs and, in its final and most prosperous days, was ruled by Motecuhzoma II, also known as Montezuma.

At its peak, Tenochtitlan was a thriving and imposing city with around 200,000 inhabitants. It was characterised by its enormous pyramids and clear street grids, dividing Tenochtitlan into four zones.

In 1519 AD, during Montezuma’s rule, Spanish invaders led by Hernán Cortés arrived in Tenochtitlan and by 1521 the city was conquered. Much of Tenochtitlan was subsequently razed to the ground, leaving little behind.

Today, remnants of Tenochtitlan are hard to find as they have been consumed by the development of modern Mexico City. Those Tenochtitlan sites which have been excavated, including five temples of which Templo Mayor is one, are protected on UNESCO’s World Heritage list, however there is no single Aztec site to visit.

One of the most popular Tenochtitlan sites is Xochimilco. This is more of a beautiful park rather than an archaeological ruin, but features waterways that ran from the Aztec era as well as some Chinampas (flower gardens) from that time. Alternatively, see the Templo Mayor entry for a more traditional site.

Photo by Darij & Ana (cc)

Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan is a well preserved ancient Mesoamerican city near Mexico City.

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Teotihuacan was a holy Mesoamerican city built in around 400 BC in what is now Mexico and forms one of the country’s oldest archeological sites.

Whilst the founders of Teotihuacan have never been definitively identified, it is thought that the city was inhabited by the Toltecs and was also an important Aztec site.

Literally translated as the place “where gods are created”, Teotihuacan was clearly a city of significant religious importance to its inhabitants, as illustrated by the wealth of monuments at the site.

Characterised by looming stepped pyramids, indeed one of the most impressive aspects of Teotihuacan is the sheer size of these monuments, including the Pyramid of the Sun, which measures 225 by 222 metres at its base, rising 75 metres high.

Incredibly well-preserved, despite a fire which tore through Teotihuacan in the 7th century, Teotihuacan is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

However, it is not just Teotihuacan’s religious monuments which make it such an important and popular site. In fact, it is estimated that these make up a mere 10% of the total excavated site and the rest includes castles, such as the Palace of Quetzalcoatl and the Palace of the Citadel, residential buildings and communal buildings.

Visitors to Teotihuacan can maneuver their way through the city via its original streets, such as Avenue of the Dead, which divided the city into quarters, although take note that the site is absolutely enormous.

Today, Teotihuacan is one of the most popular tourist sites in Mexico and includes numerous museums, including the Museo del Sitio, just south of the Pyramid of the Sun where visitors can see various artefacts from the site. It also features as one of our Top Ten Tourist Attractions in Mexico.

The National Palace of Mexico

The National Palace of Mexico is an important landmark representing Mexico’s independence.

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The National Palace of Mexico, or Palacio Nacional, was originally constructed in 1692 on a site which has been central to Mexico’s governance since Aztec times.

It became the National Palace in 1821, following the Mexican War of Independence, and houses the bell rung by the priest and original leader of this conflict, Miguel Hidalgo.

Hidalgo rang the bell in 1810 to signal Mexico’s independence during his famous “Cry of Dolores” speech, although he would not live to see this as he was beheaded shortly thereafter.

The National Palace served as the main command point during the US-Mexican War of 1846-1848 and is currently the seat of the country’s president as well as being home to the Federal Treasury and National Archives. Visitors to the National Palace can view Diego Rivera’s murals of Mexico’s history, particularly that of Spain’s conquest of the country in 1520.

Tulum

Tulum is a cliff-top Maya site in Mexico’s Quintana Roo region with some interesting and quite well preserved ruins.

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Tulum is a Maya site in Mexico’s Quintana Roo region dating back to between the 13th and 16th centuries. At its peak, Tulum was quite a thriving walled city.

Whilst relatively modest in comparison to, say Chichen Itza, Tulum does feature some interesting and quite well preserved ruins, including its castle, city walls and temples. One of the highlights at Tulum is its Temple of the Frescoes, with some original frescoes inside it. However, the real beauty of Tulum is its shimmering beachside location.

Tulum features as one of our Top Ten Tourist Attractions in Mexico.

Photo by Historvius

Uxmal

Uxmal was a Maya city in Yucatan, Mexico and is today a UNESCO World Heritage site.

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Uxmal is an archaeological site in Mexico which houses the ruins of a Maya town thought to have been inhabited as early as 800BC. Having said this, most of the buildings and structures seen at Uxmal today were constructed in between around 700AD to 1000AD.

A thriving city and a religious centre with great ceremonial significance, at its peak Uxmal had a population of around 25,000 people. Uxmal was abandoned in 1200AD and then inhabited by the Yiu, who would later join the Mayapan League with Chichen Itza.

The layout of the town of Uxmal is one of its most interesting aspects, having been carefully aligned to fit with concepts of astronomy, offering an insight into the beliefs and culture of the Mayas who lived there. Uxmal was also quite advanced in its use of hydraulic systems to gather water up to the hill or “Puuc” on which it was set. Like other ancient cities in Mexico, Uxmal has a series of ceremonial pyramids the most celebrated of which is the Pyramid of the Soothsayer.

Translated as ‘Pyramide el Adivino’ and sometimes known as the “House of the Magician”, the Pyramid of the Soothsayer is an impressive 100-foot high monument dating back to the Late Classic Period. It is flanked by several temples, which were built over time, although legend has it that this pyramid took just one night to complete. Sadly, the pyramid cannot be climbed by tourists.

Beyond this well-known monument, Uxmal has several other impressive structures. The Governor's Palace (Palacio del Gobernador) is one such example, it being completely symmetrical and ornately decorated with depictions of astronomy symbols as well as of the rain god, Chaac. This is near the Casa de las Tortugas or “The House of the Tortoises” which is a simple yet pretty building.

Also at Uxmal is the Quadrangle of the Nuns, also called The Nunnery or “Cuadrangulo de las Monjas” which is comprised of four stone buildings neatly surrounding a courtyard and, like the Governor's Palace, is resplendent with religious artwork. Built at a similar time to the Nunnery and like the one in the city of El Tajin, Uxmal has a ball court, where its citizens would have participated in games.

Uxmal is now a UNESCO World Heritage site and also has a small museum. Organised tours from Merida can last a whole day and include sites such as Kabah. Audio guides are available in several languages for an added fee.

Uxmal features as one of our Top 10 Tourist Attractions in Mexico.

Photo by Herr_Bert (cc)

Xcaret

Xcaret houses the ruins of a Maya city which reached its peak in the 15th and 16th centuries.

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Xcaret houses the ruins of a Maya city which reached its peak in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Located in Mexico’s Quintana Roo region, Xcaret was then known as Ppole and is said to have been of great ceremonial importance, as evidenced by its wealth of temples, homes and monuments.

The Xcaret ruins are actually part of a much larger eco and amusement park, with a range of activities.

Photo by archer10 (Dennis) (cc)

Xlapak

Xlapak is a small archaeological site in Mexico’s Yucatan region.

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Xlapak is one of the smaller of the archaeological sites along the Puuc Trail in the Yucatan State in Mexico, a trail of Maya sites in the hilly part of this otherwise flat state.

The main structure at Xlapak is a small palace which is adorned with carvings of the rain god, Chaac.

Xochicalco

Xochicalco is an important pre-Columbian site in Mexico and a World Heritage site.

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Xochicalco is an important pre-Columbian site in Mexico, listed by UNESCO for its well-preserved ruins dating from an important period in Mesoamerican history.

At Xochicalco’s peak between 650AD and 900AD - during the Epiclassic period - the Mesoamerican world was in great flux, with places like Tikal, Teotihuacan and Palenque being broken up. As such, this city’s ruins are seen to represent the coming together of several cultures.

Xochicalco’s impressive hierarchy of ruins includes a ball court, a palace, temples, monuments and homes, all carefully arranged amid terraces, plazas and ramps to great effect.

Xochicalco features as one of our Top Ten Visitor Attractions in Mexico.

Photo by maximalideal (cc)

Yagul

Yagul was a fortified Zapotec settlement in Oaxaca in Mexico.

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Yagul is an archaeological site in Mexico’s Oaxaca region inhabited by the Pre-Columbian civilisation of the Zapotecs, although the exact time of their first occupation of this area is unknown (sometime between 500 and 100 BC). Yagul was still in use at the time of the Spanish Conquest.

Somewhat dwarfed by the grandeur of nearby Monte Alban, Yagul is smaller and has undergone less excavation than its famous counterpart yet it does have a series of interesting monuments. Amongst other things, Yagul has a ball court, similar to the one seen at Monte Alban and at other Zapotec sites and a large labyrinth of a palace, thought to have been built for its leaders.

It is clear from the remaining parts of its fortress wall that Yagul was heavily defended, helped by its position atop a hill. Lower down the hill, visitors can see what was once its central plaza, surrounded by several palaces and temples. Also in this section is a site known as the Triple Tomb or “Tumba Triple”, one of many tombs found in Yagul. Visitors can ask to view the Triple Tomb, as long as escorted by one of the guards.

Yagul is often overlooked by tourists, but is worth seeing if only for the peaceful nature of its setting which makes viewing its sites a calmer experience than many in the region.