Historic sites in Israel

If you’re looking to explore Historic Sites in Israel and the surrounding area then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s a fantastic selection of  Historic Sites in Israel and you can plan some great things to see on your trips by browsing our selection. Once you’ve explored the  Historic Sites in Israel you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan out your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook.

Our database of historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other  Historic Sites in Israel, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.
 

Israel: Editor's Picks

Photo by Historvius

1. Caesarea

Caesarea in Israel was an Ancient Roman city later conquered by the Crusaders.

Caesarea or “Keysarya” was an Ancient Roman city which is now a large archaeological site in Israel. It is believed that the city of Caesarea was initially founded atop the ruins of Straton's Tower, a third century BC Phoenician port city. Conquered by King Alexander Jannaeus of the Hasmonean Kingdom in... Read More

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2. Yad Vashem

Yad Vashem is the museum of the Holocaust in Jerusalem.

Yad Vashem in Jerusalem is a museum and a memorial of the Holocaust, in which over six million Jews, and at least five million from other ethnic groups, were murdered in an act of genocide perpetrated by the German National Socialist Party (the Nazis) under Adolph Hitler. Beginning with the persecution... Read More

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3. Masada

Mount Masada hosts the remains of an ancient Jewish fotress which served as the last outpost for the Zealots from the Romans in the Jewish Wars.

The fortress of Masada, which rises majestically above the Dead Sea, was originally built in 150BC. The original structure was renovated by Herod the Great in 43BC in order to improve its capacity to withstand drawn-out sieges. In 66AD, Masada was the site of the last stand of the Jewish Zealots... Read More

Israel: Site Index

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Acre

Acre is a UNESCO listed site of a city in Israel fortified by the Crusaders and the Ottomans.

Acre or “Akko” is an ancient city in Israel which has been almost continuously inhabited since at least 3000 BC, during the Early Bronze Age. Today, the Old City of Acre is a UNESCO World Heritage site, with a myriad of ruins representing the many civilisations that ruled the area... Read More

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Arsuf

The site of Arsuf, also known as Apollonia, contains the remains of a Crusader castle once occupied by the Knights Hospitaller.

Arsuf, also known as Apollonia, contains the remains of an ancient settlement on the Israeli coast that has stood for over 1,000 years. Arsuf is best known for the remains of a once-mighty Crusader castle which was once home to the Knights Hospitaller, but the site also contains remnants from... Read More

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Avdat

Avdat was an ancient Nabatean city along a prosperous trade route.

Avdat or “Ovdat” is an archaeological site in Israel which houses the pretty remains of an ancient Nabatean city later inhabited by the Romans, the Byzantines and the Arabs. It initially formed part of the trading route known as the Incense Route which ran from the Mediterranean to south Arabia... Read More

Ayn Jalut Battlefield

Ayn Jalut Battlefield was the site of a pivotal clash between the Mamluks and the Mongols.

This is the very approximate site of the Ayn Jalut Battlefield (also spelt Ain Jalut). The Battle of Ayn Jalut, which was fought on 3 September 1260, is often seen as a pivotal moment in Mongol history. Indeed it was at the Ayn Jalut Battlefield that the Mamluks decisively defeated... Read More

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Beit She’an

Beit Shean is an immensely impressive archaeological site with remains dating back mostly to the Roman and Byzantine period.

The ancient city of Beit She’an in the northern Jordan Valley is an immensely impressive archaeological site with remains dating back mostly to the Roman and Byzantine period. The site itself has an extensive history dating back to around the fifth millennium BC and was a significant settlement... Read More

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Church of the Annunciation - Nazareth

The Church of the Annunciation is believed to be the site where Gabriel told Mary she was to conceive the son of G-d.

The Church of the Annunciation, often called the Basilica of the Annunciation, is located in Nazareth on the site where it is believed that the angel Gabriel told Mary that she was to miraculously conceive the son of G-d. This holy Christian event is known as the Annunciation. While the structure... Read More

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Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Built on the believed site of the crucifixion, tomb and resurrection of Jesus Christ, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is possibly the holiest site in Christianity.

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem is holiest site in Christianity due the fact that it encompasses what are thought to be the last five stations travelled through by Christ, ending in his crucifixion. Built in 325/6AD by Roman Emperor Constantine I (the first such emperor to convert to Christianity), the... Read More

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Church of the Nativity

The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is believed to have been the site of the birthplace of Jesus Christ.

The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is one of the oldest Christian churches in existence and is believed to be located on the site where Jesus Christ was born. The first church on this site is thought to have been built by Roman Emperor Constantine and his mother St. Helena... Read More

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Church of the Primacy of St. Peter

The Church of the Primacy of St. Peter in Tabgha is where Jesus is said to have reinstated Peter.

The Church of the Primacy of St. Peter is a Franciscan Chapel in Tabgha in Israel built in 1933 on the site where Jesus is believed to have reinstated Peter as the head of the Apostles. This was the third time that Jesus had appeared to his disciples. Parts of the... Read More

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Dome of the Rock

The Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem is one of the world’s most famous holy sites, of great significance to Muslims and Jews.

The Dome of the Rock, known in Arabic as Qubbat as-Sakhrah, in Jerusalem is one of the world’s most famous holy sites. Not only is its iconic golden dome an integral part of the Jerusalem landscape, but the Dome of the Rock and its location are of great significance to... Read More

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Hezekiah’s Tunnel

Hezekiah's Tunnel in Jerusalem is an ancient aqueduct created by the King of Judah to protect the city’s water supply from invaders.

Hezekiah's Tunnel, also known as Siloam Tunnel and the Tunnel of Shiloh, in Jerusalem was built by the 14th king of Judah, King Hezekiah, in 701 BC. Upon hearing of the approach of the Assyrian army, the king wanted to protect the city’s water supply and thus ordered the construction... Read More

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Independence Hall - Tel Aviv

Independence Hall is a museum at the site where the State of Israel was born.

Independence Hall, part of the Eretz Israel Museum in Tel Aviv, is the site in which the State of Israel was founded. At 4 pm on 14 May 1948, eight hours before the end of the British Mandate, Prime Minister David Ben Gurion made the Proclamation of Independence, creating the... Read More

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Mamshit

Mamshit in Israel is the site of one of four UNESCO listed Nabatean cities which prospered as part of the Incense trading route.

Mamshit was an ancient Nabatean city which formed part of the Incense Road, a trading route of various spices in the Mediterranean and south Arabia. In fact, it is one of four such cities in the Negev Desert in Israel which form the UNESCO World Heritage site of the Incense Route.... Read More

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Rabin Square

Rabin Square was the site of the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin in 1995.

Rabin Square (Kikar Rabin) is a large public plaza in Tel Aviv, Israel. Formerly called Israel Kings’ Square, it was renamed Rabin Square after Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who was assassinated there in 1995. The assassination of Prime Minister Rabin took place on 4 November of that year during a peace... Read More

Temple Mount

The Temple Mount in Jerusalem is one of the holiest sites for Jews, Muslims and Christians and is believed to be the site of many significant events for each of these religions.

The Temple Mount in Jerusalem is one of the holiest sites for Jews, Muslims and Christians. Also known as Mount Moriah, Har haBáyit in Hebrew and as the Noble Sanctuary or al-haram al-qudsī ash-sharīf for Muslims, Temple Mount is believed to be the site of many significant events for each... Read More

The Caesarea Aqueduct

The Caesarea Aqueduct is the remaining section of the aqueduct that supplied the Roman city of Caesarea.

The Caesarea Aqueduct is the picturesque, well-preserved ruin of the ancient Roman aqueduct which served the city of Caesarea. Mostly constructed during the reign of King Herod the Great, the majority of the great public buildings, infrastructure and monuments of Caesarea were built from around 22 BC onwards. The city became a... Read More

The Coenaculum - Jerusalem

The Coenaculum in Jerusalem is a Crusader-built structure at the believed location of The Last Supper.

The Coenaculum in Jerusalem is a room built by the Crusaders in the fourteenth century, later taken over by the Franciscans and then transformed into a mosque by the Ottomans in the sixteenth century. However, for Christians, it is best known as the “Last Supper Room”, the upper room where Jesus... Read More

The Shiloach Pool

The Shiloach Pool in Jerusalem is thought to date back to the Byzantine period.

The Shiloach Pool or “Pool of Siloam” in Jerusalem is mentioned in the bible and the current site is believed by archaeologists to date back to the Byzantine period. It would have been fed by Hezekiah's Tunnel. It is believed that this pool was originally one of two, the second,... Read More

The Western Wall

The Western Wall is the remaining wall of the Second Temple in Jerusalem built by King Herod.

The Western Wall, also known as the Wailing Wall, Ha Kotel and the Al-Buraq Wall, is the sole remaining part of a wall of the Second Temple of Jerusalem. This temple, which stood from 516 BC, was the holiest of Jewish sites and was built to replace the First Temple.... Read More