Historic sites in Greece

Historic-Sites-in-GreeceFrom the Acropolis to Delphi, Knossos to Thebes, the Historic sites in Greece draw tourists in their hordes every year. Indeed, famed as the home of the magnificent ancient Greek civilisation, this modern nation boasts an incredible wealth of things to see.

Yet, the Historic sites in Greece do not stop at the ancient Greek variety. Roman, Byzantine and medieval sites pepper both the mainland and its many islands, offering a diversity of sightseeing.

Our interactive map and individual links allow you to explore Historic sites in Greece easily and in detail, offering you a fantastic selection. Once you’ve explored the Historic sites in Greece you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan out your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. Our database of historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other Historic sites in Greece, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

Greece: Editor's Picks

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1. The Acropolis

The Acropolis is an incredible monument to the achievements of ancient Greek civilisation and is one of the most recognisable historic sites in Greece, if not the world. Containing a number of ancient structures, most famously the Parthenon, it tops the list for any visit to Athens.

The Acropolis is one of the most recognisable historic sites in the world and remains an inspirational monument to the achievements of Ancient Greek civilisation. Standing tall above the Greek city of Athens, the Acropolis contains a number of buildings and monuments from Greek Antiquity, including the Parthenon,... Read More

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2. Epidaurus

Once an ancient Greek city on the mainland, Epidaurus is now an incredible UNESCO-listed historic site with the ruins of many spas and a beautiful theatre.

Epidaurus was a major city in Ancient Greece famed as a centre for healing. Inhabited since prehistoric times, Epidaurus thrived as a sanctuary devoted to the healing deities including Apollo, Asklepios and Hygeia and contained hundreds of spas, the remains of many of which can be seen today. The main sanctuary area,... Read More

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3. Corinth

Of major importance to both the ancient Greeks Romans, Corinth is has some of the best preserved historic sites in Greece and is a popular tourist destination.

Ancient Corinth, the ruins of which can be found in the modern town of Korinthos, was a city of major importance in Ancient Greece and in Ancient Rome. Located in between mainland Greece and the Peloponnese, Corinth was a vital port and a thriving city-state as well as being of... Read More

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4. Mycenae

Once the centre of the Mycenaean civilisation, this is now a well-preserved ancient Greek archaeological site in the Peloponnese.

Mycenae is an important archaeological site in Greece which was once the city at the centre of the Mycenaean civilisation of between 1600BC and 1100BC. Believed to have been inhabited since Neolithic times, Mycenae flourished into a fortified city and was ruled at one time by the famous King Agamemnon. At... Read More

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5. Olympia

Of all the historic sites in Greece, Olympia is renowned as the birthplace of the Olympic Games and is an important World Heritage archaeological site.

Olympia was a vibrant Ancient Greek city. It is believed that the site of Olympia was inhabited from 3000 BC, however it was after the fall of the Mycenaean civilisation that the city began to flourish and, by 900 BC it was already considered an important religious site. The Olympic Games In... Read More

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6. Vergina Museum

A site that fuels the imagination, the Vergina Museum is a fascinating underground vault containing the tomb of Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great. For scholars of history, it's one of the most important historic sites in Greece.

The Vergina Museum in northern Greece contains some of the most astonishing ancient tomb discoveries in history – namely tombs said to be of Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great, and Alexander IV, the conqueror’s son. The tombs were discovered by Greek archaeologist Manolis Andronikos in 1977 and,... Read More

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7. Delphi

Once considered to have been the centre of the Earth, Delphi is among the most iconic historic sites in Greece and home to famed ruins such as the Temple of Apollo.

Delphi is an archaeological site in mainland Greece comprised of the well-preserved ruins of one of the most important cities in Ancient Greece. Archaeologists have found evidence that Delphi was inhabited as early as the Neolithic period and sites dating back to the Mycenaean Civilisation, but it was the Ancient... Read More

8. Knossos

The thriving centre of the ancient Minoan civilisation, Knossos is one of the most famous historic places in Greece.

Knossos or ‘ko-no-so’ was an important ancient site found on the outskirts of the modern city of Heraklion in Crete. It is believed that Knossos was first established a place of settlement in Neolithic times in around 7000 BC and then continuously inhabited until the Ancient Roman period. Knossos reached its... Read More

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9. Sparta

The Greek city of Sparta was one of the most famous city-states of the ancient world and is one of the many historic sites in Greece immortalised by Hollywood.

Sparta was one of the most famous city-states of the ancient world and left not only a mark in our historic records, but its very culture at the heart of modern language – the English word 'Spartan' reflecting their very way of life – simple, basic, severe. Rising to power in... Read More

Greece: Site Index

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Acropolis of Rhodes

These are the main remains of what was the city of Rhodes in the Hellenistic period.

The Acropolis of Rhodes is the site of the main remains of what was the city of Rhodes in the Hellenistic period. Containing several different sites, including temples, monuments and public buildings, the Acropolis of Rhodes represents the main ancient site in the city, dating to mostly the third and second... Read More

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Agios Eleftherios

This diminutive yet important Byzantine church in Athens is known as the little cathedral.

Agios Eleftherios is a very small yet important Byzantine church in Athens set in the shadow of the city’s cathedral. Built in the twelfth century, Agios Eleftherios was once the main church in Athens. This fact, coupled with the vision of the diminutive church next to the monolith of Athens... Read More

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Aigai

Aigai in northern Greece, was once capital of the Macedonian kingdom and the site where Alexander the Great was proclaimed king. A number of remains of the ancient town can be seen, including the tomb of Alexander’s father

Aigai in northern Greece was once the capital of the Macedonian kingdom and it was here in 336BC that Alexander the Great was proclaimed King of Macedon after the assassination of his father, Philip II. Though evidence of human occupation of the site stretches back to the 3rd millennium BC, it... Read More

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Akrotiri

Renowned for its incredible frescos, Akrotiri is a beautifully preserved ancient site in Santorini and one of the historic sites in Greece famed for its connection to the Minoans.

Akrotiri is a beautifully preserved ancient site in Santorini, famed for its incredible frescos and its connection with the Minoans. In fact, Akrotiri was inhabited as early as the 4th millennium BC - some say earlier - during the late Neolithic period. It would then thrive and grow into a... Read More

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Ancient Agora of Athens

The Ancient Agora of Athens was a market, a meeting place and the social, political and commercial hub of the ancient city.

The Ancient Agora of Athens was a market, a meeting place and the social, political and commercial hub of the ancient city. Whilst initial developed in the sixth century BC, the Ancient Agora of Athens was destroyed, rebuilt and renovated several times, including attacks by the Persians in 480BC, the... Read More

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Aptera

large site on northern coats of Crete. Key strategic location results in occupation from early Greek through Roman, early Christian to Ottoman with WW2 machine gun posts. Impossible to provide one picture to show whole site. Would like to split according to place and time.

The archaeological site of Aptera contains an array of interesting Greco-Roman ruins, the highlight of which is probably the remains of the Roman cisterns which originally supplied water to the city’s baths. Founded around the 7th century BC, Aptera became one of the most important cities of western Crete and grew... Read More

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Arch of Hadrian - Athens

The Arch of Hadrian is a triumphal gateway in Athens built in the 2nd century AD.

The Arch of Hadrian of Athens is a triumphal gateway built in the second century AD (circa 132 AD). This is definitely not the most impressive of ancient gateways, its Pentelic marble now damaged by years of exposure to pollution.... Read More

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Asklepieion

This well-preserved archaeological site houses the ruins of the birthplace of medicine.

Asklepieion, also known as Asclepeion, in Kos was an ancient Greek and Roman sacred centre of healing based on the teachings of Hippocrates. It seems that there has been a healing sanctuary at the site of Asklepieion since prehistory, but the main ruins today are those of later sanctuaries. The most... Read More

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Athens Cathedral

Athens Cathedral was built over the course of two decades in the 19th century.

Athens Cathedral (Metropolis) was built over the course of two decades in the nineteenth century.... Read More

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Athens National Archaeological Museum

With over 20,000 pieces on display, Athens National Archaeological Museum is one of the most popular historic attractions in Greece.

Athens National Archaeological Museum is the largest museum in Greece, housing over 20,000 exhibits spread over 8,000 square metres of an imposing nineteenth century building. With permanent exhibitions ranging from the Neolithic era and the Mycenaean era to the Ancient Romans and even the Ancient Egyptians, the Athens National Archaeological Museum’s... Read More

Athens War Museum

This museum houses an extensive range of exhibits relating to the history of war.

The Athens War Museum houses an extensive range of exhibits relating to the history of war in Greece as well as some relating to wars in other nations. From weapons and uniforms to maps and prints, the Athens War Museum covers many time periods, from prehistory to World War II and... Read More

Averof Museum

The most famous Greek warship, the Averof saw action for over 40 years including during the two world wars.

The Georgios Averof is the most famous of all Greek warships and was in service for over 40 years, including seeing action during both world wars. Today the Averof is home to a maritime and nautical museum in Athens. Launched in 1911, the warship was built at the Orlando Shipyards in... Read More

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Bassae

Bassae is an ancient site and home to a famed UNESCO-listed monument to Apollo Epicurius.

Bassae is an ancient site where the Phigaleia built a sanctuary to the cult of Apollo Epicurius. A 5th Century BC magnificent temple in honour of the deity still stand there today. At one time, the Messenians people fled to Bassae, seeking sanctuary there from their war with the Spartans.... Read More

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Benaki Museum

The Benaki Museum houses a vast collection of art and artefacts from Greek history, from Hellenic, Roman and Byzantine Greece to the Ottoman age and right up to the present day.

The Benaki Museum in Athens houses over 100,000 artefacts from Greek history and showcases the many eras, civilisations and cultures which have influenced the development of Greece. Spread over a number of locations, the museum ranks among Greece’s foremost cultural institutions. The main museum is located in the centre of Athens... Read More

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Byzantine Museum

With over 25,000 artefacts of national importance dating from the 3rd to 20th centuries AD, the Byzantine Museum is a popular attraction in Athens.

The Byzantine Museum in Athens contains over 25,000 artefacts of national importance and is a popular attraction for visitors to the Greek capital. The museum’s vast collection covers the Early Christian, Byzantine, Medieval and post-Byzantine eras. It includes religious artefacts, stunning iconography, sculpture, textiles, paintings, manuscripts, jewels, ceramics and art. The museum... Read More

Casa Romana - Kos

Casa Romana is a 3rd century Ancient Roman villa in Kos.

Casa Romana is a third century Ancient Roman villa in Kos. With its 36 rooms, Casa Romana would certainly have been luxurious. It was also built atop an earlier Hellenistic villa, probably from the first century. Across from Casa Romana are the ruins of the second century Temple of Dionysus, not... Read More

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Castle of the Knights - Kos

One of several historic sites in Greece relating to the Knights Hospitaller, the Castle of the Knights in Kos is an impressive ruin.

The Castle of the Knights in Kos, sometimes referred to as Kos Castle, was the one of the fortifications of the Knights Hospitaller. Begun in the fourteenth century, the main purpose of the Castle of the Knights was to defend Kos from the Ottomans. In 1495, the Castle of the Knights... Read More

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Delos

Delos is the island on which Apollo was said to have been born and an ancient World Heritage site.

Delos is an island and archaeological site which was held sacred by the ancient Greeks as the birthplace of the deity Apollo. It is unclear as to whether his twin sister Artemis was also believed to have been born there. There were temples built in honour of Artemis at Delos,... Read More

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Delos Archaeological Museum

This interesting museum houses finds from the ancient site of Delos.

The Delos Archaeological Museum contains findings from the UNESCO World Heritage site of Delos. Inhabited since prehistoric times, Delos was an ancient Greek holy site, believed to have been the birthplace of the deity Apollo. Amongst its collection, the Delos Archaeological Museum houses a range of pottery, funerary artefacts and stelae... Read More

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Delphi Archaeological Museum

This archaeological museum exhibits artefacts from the ancient Greek city of Delphi.

Delphi Archaeological Museum is an historical museum dedicated to exploring the history and exhibiting artifacts from the nearby archeological site of ancient Delphi. Delphi was a major city of Ancient Greece and its sites are themselves popular tourist attractions. Amongst its displays, Delphi Archaeological Museum exhibits statues, sculptures and everyday items... Read More

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Dion

Dion is an ancient city in Greece which became the religious centre of the Macedonian kingdom and now contains a number of Greek and Roman-era ruins.

Dion is an ancient city in Greece which contains a number of Greek- and Roman-era ruins. Today it operates as an archaeological site and museum. Very much a place of religious importance, Dion became the religious centre of the Macedonian kingdom in the 5th century BC as well as hosting important... Read More

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Eleusis

An archaeological site of great national importance, the Greco-Roman ruins at Eleusis are beautifully preserved and steeped in the richness of Greek mythology.

Eleusis archaeological site contains a range of impressive Greco-Roman ruins, steeped in the richness of Greek mythology. Surrounded on all sides by a thriving modern industrial town, the site of Eleusis is renowned as the home of the Eleusinian Mysteries, a series of annual initiation ceremonies for the cult of Demeter... Read More

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Gortyna

Gortyna in Crete was the capital of Crete and Cyrene during the Roman era.

Gortyna or “Gortyn” in Crete was an ancient settlement originally founded in approximately 3000 BC, during the Neolithic era. However, it was during the Roman era, from around the first to the fifth centuries AD, that Gortyna flourished, with a population of up to 100,000 people. During the Roman period, Gortyna... Read More

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Grandmasters Palace - Rhodes

The former headquarters of the Knights Hospitaller of St John, the Grandmasters Palace of Rhodes is one of the most important medieval historic sites in Greece.

The Grandmasters Palace of Rhodes was the palace of the Knights Hospitaller of St John. Dating to the fourteenth century (circa 1309), the Grandmasters Palace would be the base of this famous Christian and military order until Rhodes was captured by the Ottomans in 1522. Under this empire the Grandmasters Palace... Read More

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Hadrian’s Library

Built by the Emperor Hadrian, this ancient library originally housed over 17,000 books, scrolls, documents and papyri. The ruins of the site were opened to the public in 2004.

The ruins of Hadrian’s Library in Athens are all that remain of this important centre of ancient learning, which was built by the Roman Emperor Hadrian between 125 and 132 AD. Hadrian was a great admirer of Greek culture and constructed a number of significant buildings in Athens, including this grand... Read More

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Hellenic Parliament

The neoclassical Parliament building on Syntagma Square the centre of Athens has been the seat of Government since 1935 and was previously the Old Royal Palace built for King Otto.

The Hellenic Parliament is an imposing building located in Syntagma Square in the centre of Athens. Completed in 1843, it was originally the Royal Palace of Greece and was designed by German architect Friedrich von Gärtner for King Otto. After being damaged in a fire in 1884 and again in 1909,... Read More

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Heraklion Archaeological Museum

This archaeological museum tells the story of ancient Crete.

The Heraklion Archaeological Museum is a museum dedicated to Crete’s ancient past, spanning the time from the Neolithic period to the Roman period, being a period of around 5,500 years. The highlight of the Heraklion Archaeological Museum is possibly its extensive Minoan collection, being one of the most comprehensive in the... Read More

Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki

The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki tells the story of the city’s Jewish community since the 3rd century BC.

The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki (Museo Djidio De Salonik) tells the story of the city’s Jewish community since the 3rd century BC. Established to explore the history and heritage of Sephardic Jews since their arrival following expulsion from Spain in the 15th century, the Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki now... Read More

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Kamiros

Kamiros was an ancient city on the island of Rhodes, the ruins of which include an acropolis.

Kamiros (Kameiros) was an ancient city on the island of Rhodes, the ruins of which include an acropolis. Excavations have revealed a long a diverse history at Kamiros including a temple to Athena dating to the 8th century BC. Twice destroyed by earthquakes (in 226BC and 142BC), the main remains... Read More

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Kapnikarea

Sitting right in the middle of bustling modern streets, Kapnikarea is a beautiful 11th century Byzantine church in Athens.

Sitting right in the middle of bustling modern streets, Kapnikarea is a beautiful 11th century Byzantine church in Athens. Built around 1050 AD, the church was constructed atop the remains of an earlier ancient Greek temple, probably dedicated to either Athena or Demeter. Kapnikarea looks oddly out of place in the middle... Read More

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Kerameikos

One of the more hidden historic sites of Greece located in Athens, Kerameikos was the site of an important ancient burial ground.

Kerameikos is an archaeological site in Athens which contains the remains an important ancient burial ground as well as a series of famous monuments. Once home to the city’s potters - hence its name meaning pottery - Kerameikos developed to also become the site of a cemetery. In fact, some of... Read More

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Kos Ancient Agora

This ancient agora contains a series of ruins dating from the 4th century BC to the 6th century AD.

The Kos Ancient Agora contains a series of ruins dating from the fourth century BC to the sixth century AD. Amongst them are a temple, probably dedicated to Hercules, a shrine to Aphrodite and the columns of a stoa or covered walkway dating from the third century BC. Over time, the... Read More

Lappa Fulling Mill

The Lappa Fulling Mill is one of few fulling mills to survive, mainly because they were made of wood. This one was discovered only in 1994.

The Lappa Fulling Mill is one of few fulling mills to survive, mainly because they were made of wood. This one was discovered only in 1994. Fulling is the process which makes loose woven cloth into the smooth, firm fabrics were are familiar with. Fulling mills were among the first mechanical... Read More

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Lato

The atmospheric archaeological site of Lato contains the ruins of the ancient city which once dominated this area.

The archaeological site of Lato in eastern Crete contains the ruins of the ancient city which once dominated this area. The city was built atop two high hills which dominated the local area and went on to flourish throughout the Hellenic era. Lato was also the birthplace of Nearchos, the admiral... Read More

Meteora

Inhabited since the 11th century, the monasteries of Meteora are some of the most visually arresting historical sites in Greece, perched high on its mountains. UNESCO-listed.

Meteora is an incredible set of monasteries each perched high atop Greek mountains in area of extraordinary natural beauty. In fact “Meteora” literally means “suspended in the air”. The sites on which the Meteora monasteries were built are believed to have first been inhabited by a group of monks who... Read More

Museum of Byzantine Culture - Thessaloniki

This museum in Thessaloniki explores the history and heritage of the Byzantine era.

The Museum of Byzantine Culture in Thessaloniki in Greece is dedicated to exploring various aspects of the Byzantine period, from its beginnings in the third and fourth centuries AD to its fall to the Ottomans in 1453. As its name suggests, the Museum of Byzantine Culture explores various social aspects relating... Read More

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Mystras

An entire city built around a 13th century castle, Mystras is one of the medieval historical sites of Greece.

Mystras or “Morea” sits atop a hill overlooking the city of Sparta. In approximately 1248-1249, William II of Villehardouin, a prince of Achaea who had taken part in the Fourth Crusade, decided to build a stronghold there as a defence from the Byzantines. Soon after the castle was completed, William was... Read More

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National Historical Museum

The National Historical Museum in Athens covers modern Greek history and folklore between the fifteenth and twentieth centuries.

Considered one of the architectural jewels of Athens, the National Historical Museum is a building of significant national importance and covers Greek history and folklore between the fifteenth and twentieth centuries. The museum building itself was previously the seat of the Greek Parliament and was used for that purpose until the... Read More

Nymphaeum of Kos

Probably one of the more unlikely historic attractions in Greece, this was actually an ancient Roman luxury public lavatory.

The Nymphaeum of Kos was an Ancient Roman building and its name is something of a misnomer. Called the Nymphaeum because its opulence initially led archaeologists to think it was a sanctuary dedicated to the Nymphs, it has since been determined that this would have been a very luxurious set of lavatories. Also... Read More

Odeon of Kos

The Odeon of Kos dates back to the 2nd or 3rd century and would have served as a Roman theatre.

The Odeon of Kos dates back to the second or third century and would have served as a Roman theatre. Today, several of its original rows remain and it is certainly possible to imagine how the Odeon of Kos would have looked in its heyday. Beyond the original rows, the... Read More

Olympia Archaeological Museum

This is a museum displaying finds from the ancient city of Olympia.

Olympia Archaeological Museum is a museum focused on the Ancient Greek site of Olympia, which is located nearby. A major Greek city and the place of origin of the Olympic Games, Olympia was dedicated to Zeus and has been extensively excavated. Many of the finds from these excavations are exhibited at... Read More

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Panathenaic Stadium

The site of the first modern Olympic games, the 2,300-year-old Panathenaic Stadium in Athens is one of the most significantly important historical sites in all of Greece.

The site of the first modern Olympic games in 1896, the 2,300-year-old Panathenaic Stadium in Athens is one of the most significant historical sites in Greece. Originally built around 330 BC, the ancient stadium was used to host the Panathenaic games every four years. The stadium was rebuilt in the mid-second... Read More

Pella

Once the capital of ancient Macedonia and the birthplace of Alexander the Great, Pella may not be one of the best known tourist sites in Greece, but is of great historical importance.

Pella, near a small town in Greece by the same name, is an archaeological site which was once the thriving capital of ancient Macedonia. Established by King Amyntas III at the end of the fifth, beginning of the fourth century BC, Pella took over this role from the former capital,... Read More

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Pharsalus Battlefield

Pharsalus Battlefield was the setting for the most decisive battle of Caesar’s civil war and saw the final defeat of Pompey the Great.

Pharsalus Battlefield was the setting for one of the most decisive and important battles of ancient Rome – the defeat of Pompey the Great by Julius Caesar. It was a battle which Caesar won against the odds and it all but confirmed his position as ruler of Rome, a key... Read More

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Philippi Battlefield

Philippi Battlefield is the location of the Battle of Philippi, where Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the forces of those who had assassinated Julius Caesar.

Philippi Battlefield in modern Greece is the location of one of the most important engagements in Roman history, where Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the forces of those who had assassinated Julius Caesar – notably Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. After Caesar’s assassination in 44 BC a short, uneasy... Read More

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Philopappos Monument

A magnificent mausoleum celebrating the life of one of Athens’ most important benefactors, Julius Antiochus Philopappos, and built by the citizens of the city after his death in 116 AD.

The Philopappos Monument is a magnificent mausoleum celebrating the life of one of Athens’ most important benefactors, Gaius Julius Antiochus Epiphanes Philopappos, and built by the citizens of the city after his death in 116 AD. When Philopappos died, the citizens of Athens built a spectacular two-storey Pentelic marble mausoleum... Read More

Rhodes Archaeological Museum

This museum displays mostly Classical and Hellenistic as well as some Archaic artefacts.

The Rhodes Archaeological Museum displays mostly Classical and Hellenistic as well as some Archaic artifacts including statues, funereal pieces and decorative items. The building in which the Rhodes Archaeological Museum is located is also historically important, it being the Great Hospital of the Knights Hospitallers, built between 1440 and 1489. This... Read More

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Roman Agora of Athens

This Agora of Athens contains some of the city’s ancient Roman ruins.

The Roman Agora of Athens - also known as the Roman Forum of Athens - was founded in the late first century BC / early first century AD and its construction was funded by Julius Caesar and the Emperor Augustus. Probably the most impressive historic site at the Roman Agora of... Read More

Syntagma Metro Station

Syntagma Metro Station in Athens contains a fascinating selection of ancient artefacts which were uncovered during the station’s construction.

In the very heart of the city opposite the Parliament, Syntagma Metro Station is both a transport hub and museum. Dating from the 1990s, when Athens was building its new metro for the 2004 Olympics, the station contains numerous artefacts dating from Classical times - including skeletons - excavated... Read More

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Temple of Aphaea - Aegina

The ancient Temple of Aphaea on the island of Aegina is one of the most important and picturesque temples in Greece.

The ancient Temple of Aphaea on the island of Aegina is one of the most important and picturesque temples in Greece. The site itself was the location of an important ancient sanctuary which dates back far into antiquity. The sanctuary was dedicated to the cult of Aphaia, a local deity later... Read More

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Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae

The Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae is often said to be one of the best examples of its kind in the Peloponnese.

The Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae, also known simply at the Temple of Bassae, is not just beautifully preserved, but is often said to be one of the best examples of its kind in the Peloponnese. Built sometimes from the middle to end of the 5th Century (estimates range... Read More

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Temple of Hephaestus

The Temple of Hephaestus is an imposing ancient Greek temple in the Athenian Agora.

The Temple of Hephaestus is an imposing ancient Greek temple in the Athenian Agora and site of worship of the Greek deity of fire, blacksmiths and sculpture. Built in the fifth century BC, the Temple of Hephaestus was later incorporated into the Church of Agios Georgios, this accounting for its excellent... Read More

Temple of Olympian Zeus

With its vast columns, this is one of the most impressive ancient temples in Greece.

The Temple of Olympian Zeus, also known as the Olympeion is one of the biggest - if not actually the biggest - ancient temples in Greece. Vast and impressive, the Temple of Olympian Zeus was begun by Peisistratus the Young in the sixth century BC but various events and circumstances meant... Read More

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Temple of Poseidon - Sounio

The Temple of Poseidon of Sounio is a picturesque ruin of a Greek temple dedicated to the deity of the sea.

The Temple of Poseidon of Sounio is a picturesque ruin of a fifth century BC Greek temple dedicated to the deity of the sea. Dramatically perched on a cliff overlooking the ocean, the Temple of Poseidon of Sounio is now made up of a rectangle of restored large Doric columns. For... Read More

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The Acropolis Museum

A comprehensive museum of ancient Greece and general Athenian history, The Acropolis Museum is among the top places to visit in Greece.

The Acropolis Museum is a stunningly located and constructed archaeological museum housing a myriad of Ancient Greek artefacts, particularly those relating to the Acropolis and the Parthenon, both of which can be seen from the museum's top floor panoramic windows. Housed in an eminently modern building and using multimedia presentations side... Read More

The Agora Museum - Athens

Exhibiting finds from the Ancient Agora of Athens, this museum is housed within the reconstructed Stoa of Attalos.

The Agora Museum displays finds and artefacts from the site of the Ancient Agora of Athens. It is also located within the reconstructed ancient building of the Stoa of Attalos. Originally constructed in the mid-second century BC, the Stoa of Attalos - once a popular shopping precinct and meeting place... Read More

The Amphiareion at Oropos

The Amphiareion at Oropos was a sanctuary built in the late 5th century BC dedicated to the mythical deified seer Amphiaraos where pilgrims came from far and wide for his oracular medicinal and psychological healing.

The Amphiareion at Oropos is a ruined 5th century sanctuary in Oropos, around 30 miles north of Athens, the Greek capital city. It was built in the late 5th century BC dedicated to the mythical deified seer Amphiaraos, one of the most noble and well-respected figures in Greek mythology. Pilgrims... Read More

The Beule Gate

The Beule Gate was built in the 3rd century AD as part of a defensive wall.

The Beule Gate is one of the first things you see when entering the Acropolis complex and was built in the third century AD as part of a defensive wall. Discovered in 1852, the Beule Gate was named after archaeologist Ernest Beule.... Read More

The Choragic Monument of Lysicrates

This monument commemorated first prize in a dramatic performance Lysicrates had sponsored around 335 BCE.

The Choragic Monument of Lysicrates was the first Greek monument built in the Corinthian order. The frieze decoration depicts the adventure of Dionysos with the pirates, whom he turned into dolphins. Lysicrates is the man who paid for the monument, which commemorates a chorus that he sponsored who won first... Read More

The Erechtheion

The Erechtheion is a well preserved ancient temple in the Acropolis complex.

The Erechtheion is a well preserved ancient temple within the Acropolis complex where its believed namesake, the legendary Greek king Erechtheus, is thought to have come to worship. Immersed in myth and legend, the Erechtheion was home to several cults, including those of Poseidon, Athena and, of course, Erechtheus himself. Completed in... Read More

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The Parthenon

The Parthenon is among the most iconic surviving ancient historic sites in Greece site and is a monument to Classical Greek civilisation.

The Parthenon is probably the most famous surviving site from Ancient Greece. Standing at the heart of The Acropolis in the centre of Athens, the Parthenon is a monument to Classical Greek civilisation. Built during the golden age of Pericles - the famous Athenian statesman - the Parthenon was originally constructed... Read More

The Propylaia

An impressive site to visit in central Athens, the Propylaia was the grand entranceway to the Acropolis.

The Propylaia (also spelt Propylaea) was the grand entranceway to the Acropolis. Begun in approximately 437BC under the supervision of the architect Mnesikles, works on the Propylaia continued until 432BC, but were never completed. Nevertheless, even in its unfinished state, the Propylaia is considered to be of great architectural importance and... Read More

The White Tower of Thessaloniki

This is a cylindrical stone tower, monument and museum in Thessaloniki, capital of the Macedonian region of northern Greece.

The White Tower of Thessaloniki (in greek Lefkos Pyrgos), is a cylindrical stone tower monument and museum in the city of Thessaloniki, capital of the Macedonian region of northern Greece. The White Tower of Thessaloniki Constructed by the Ottomans in the 15th Century, it was originally built to help defend the city's... Read More

Theatre of Dionysus

The Theatre of Dionysus was one of the most important theatres in Ancient Greece.

The Theatre of Dionysus in Athens was one of the most important theatres in Ancient Greece. Initially built of timber in the sixth century BC, the Theatre of Dionysus was named in honour of the Greek deity of wine and theatre. It soon became a focal point of Ancient Greek social... Read More

Photo by Jorge Lascar (cc)

Theatre of Herodes Atticus

The Theatre of Herodes Atticus is a Roman amphitheatre built in Athens in 161AD.

The Theatre of Herodes Atticus, also known as the Odeon, is a Greco-Roman theatre built in 161 AD. It is named after an affluent Greek-born Roman senator, Herodes Atticus, who constructed it in commemoration of his wife, Regilia. Able to seat up to 5,000 people, the Theatre of Herodes Atticus was mostly... Read More

Thebes

Thebes was an ancient Mycenaean and Greek city eventually destroyed by Alexander the Great.

Thebes was a powerful city in Ancient Greece, the few remains of which can now be seen in the modern Greek town of Thiva. Whilst first occupied in Neolithic times and already thriving in the Helladic period, Thebes reached its peak during the Mycenaean period. The settlement continued to thrive, becoming... Read More

Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum

This archaeological museum in Thessaloniki has five main comprehensive exhibits, mostly focused on ancient Macedonia.

Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum takes visitors through the history of Ancient Macedonia, exploring the lives of its citizens, their ideology and their culture from Neolithic times through to the Mycenaean period and the Roman period. Exhibiting artefacts ranging from daily tools to burial pieces and ideological paraphernalia to gold, the Thessaloniki Archaeological... Read More