Historic sites in Germany

If you’re looking to discover historic sites in Germany, you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

Home of the ancient Germanic tribes, impinged on by the Romans, centre of the Holy Roman Empire and the focal point of 20th century conflict, this is a nation with a diverse history, reflected in the historic sites of Germany today.

There’s a fantastic selection of historic sites in Germany and you can plan some great trips by browsing our selection. Once you’ve explored the historic sites in Germany you can use our itinerary planner tool to chart out your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook.

Our database of German historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. So, if you know of other historic sites in Germany, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.


Top German Destinations: Historic Sites in Berlin | Historic Sites in Trier | Castles in Germany

Germany: Editor's Picks

Photo by Historvius

1. Brandenburg Gate

Few historic sites in Germany have such political, social and symbolic importance as the Romanesque gateway known as the Brandenburg Gate. Today, among other things, it is seen as a symbol of German reunification.

The Brandenburg Gate is a famous landmark in Berlin built between 1788 and 1791 which once served as a city gateway. Commissioned by King Frederick William II of Prussia it stood in the entrance to boulevard Unter den Linden, which led to the city palace. The Brandenburg Gate was designed by... Read More

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2. Imperial Baths of Trier

Amongst the largest Ancient Roman baths outside of Rome, the Imperial Baths of Trier are some of the best preserved Roman historic sites in Germany. They provide a startling reminder of the diverse nature of German history.

The Imperial Baths of Trier, known in German as Kaiserthermen, are the beautifully preserved ruins of a Roman public bath complex constructed in the fourth century AD. Considered to be the largest Roman baths outside of Rome, the remains of the Imperial Baths of Trier are centrally located within the city... Read More

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3. Berlin Wall

Built within just a day, the Berlin Wall surrounded East Berlin, separating it from West Berlin from 1961 to 1989. Today, its remains are amongst the most iconic of all the historic sites in Germany.

The Berlin Wall was an 87 mile long concrete barrier between East and West Berlin, a symbol of the Cold War and an embodiment of the so-called ‘Iron Curtain’ between eastern and western Europe. Originally just a barbed wire fence erected within 24 hours on 13 August 1961, a more robust,... Read More

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4. Berliner Dom

Berliner Dom was the royal church of the Prussian monarchy. Built in the early twentieth century during the reign of Kaiser Wilhelm II, it is a startlingly impressive place to visit.

Berliner Dom (Berlin Cathedral) is an early twentieth century cathedral built during the reign of Kaiser Wilhelm II. Constructed between 1894 and 1905, ornate and crowned with an imposing dome, Berliner Dom contains the Hohenzollern royal crypt which is the final resting place of, amongst around a hundred others, Frederick William... Read More

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5. Schwerin Castle

Schwerin Castle is a picturesque palace and once the home of the dukes of Mecklenburg. The history of the site itself dates back as far as 1160, with the current incarnation of the castle being built in the 19th century.

Schwerin Castle (Schweriner Schloss) is a picturesque palace which seemingly floats upon Schwerin Lake. Whilst it is thought that there was a fort on this location as early as the tenth century, the beginnings of Schwerin Castle date back to 1160, when Henry the Lion (Henry III) built a castle... Read More

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6. Cologne Cathedral

One of the best known ecclesiastical historical sites in Germany, Cologne Cathedral is an iconic gothic church built over the course of six hundred years and is a World Heritage site.

Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom) is a vast and impressive gothic cathedral which took over six hundred years to complete. Located on what was previously the site of a Roman villa, thought to have dated back to the fourth century as well as several increasingly larger churches, construction of the current Cologne... Read More

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7. Basilica of Constantine - Trier

One of Germnay's best - yet lesser-known - historical places, the Basilica of Constantine in Trier was the Roman Emperor’s audience hall and the biggest surviving single room from Ancient Rome.

The Basilica of Constantine or “Konstantin Basilika” in Trier in Germany is a remnant of this city’s prominent Ancient Roman history. Once the place where Emperor Constantine the Great would meet and greet audiences, the Basilica of Constantine was part of the development of Trier undertaken by the emperor from 306... Read More

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8. Worms Cathedral

Worms Cathedral is a 12th century church and burial site of the Salian Dynasty. It boasts a rich and diverse history stretching back through the centuries.

Worms Cathedral (Wormser Dom) also known as the Cathedral of St Peter is a Romanesque cathedral in the German city of Worms. A sandstone structure with distinctive conical towers, Worms Cathedral was constructed in phases throughout the twelfth century and mostly completed by 1181. In fact, the present Worms Cathedral is... Read More

Germany: Site Index

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Ansbach Residenz

A former medieval castle, Ansbach Residence was remodelled in both the 16th and 18th centuries leaving a splendidly furnished state residence.

A former medieval castle, Ansbach Residenz in Bavaria was remodelled in both the 16th and 18th centuries and is now a popular tourist attraction housing an array of Ansbach faience and porcelain. Famous for its internal rather than external beauty, Ansbach Residenz houses the largest and most importance collection of Ansbach... Read More

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Babelsberg Castle

Babelsberg Castle is a picturesque 19th century Gothic castle which boasts stunning views of the surrounding countryside.

Babelsberg Castle is a picturesque 19th century Gothic castle which boasts stunning views of the surrounding countryside. The castle was built between 1833 and 1849 and was an example of 19th century neo Gothic architecture; it was the summer residence of Emperor Wilhelm I. Another unique feature of Babelsberg are the beautiful... Read More

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Berlin Stasi Prison

The Berlin Stasi Prison was a notoriously brutal Cold War prison in East Berlin from 1951 to 1989.

The Berlin Stasi Prison, also known as the Berlin-Hohenschönhausen Memorial, was an infamous East German prison run by the East German Ministry of State Security (the Stasi) during the Cold War. Originally a canteen, in 1945 the Berlin Stasi Prison site became a detainment camp named 'Special Camp No. 3' run... Read More

Berlin’s Victory Column

Originally a symbol of Prussian victory in the Danish-Prussian War, Berlin’s Victory Column was designed by Heinrich Strack and today stands as a symbol for the city, boasting panoramic views over Berlin.

The Victory Column is one of the most recognisable - and popular - tourist attractions in Berlin. It stands 67 metres tall including the sculpture at the top known as ’Golden Lizzie’. Built between 1864 and 1873, the column was designed by German architect Heinrich Strack to commemorate the Prussian... Read More

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Braunfels Castle

Braunfels Castle is a beautifully picturesque medieval castle which towers above the Lahn valley. Highlights include the museum and Knight’s Hall which showcase collections of weaponry, armour, art, sculpture and medieval furniture.

Braunfels Castle is a beautifully picturesque medieval castle which towers above the Lahn valley. Towering on the crest of a basalt rock, Braunfels Castle has been through several incarnations over the centuries. Believed to have been first built in the mid-thirteenth century, this imposing fortification was expanded and reinforced over the... Read More

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Burg Rheinfels

Burg Rheinfels was an imposing medieval fortification, the dramatic ruins of which lie in St Goar in Germany.

Burg Rheinfels was an imposing medieval fortification, the dramatic ruins of which lie in St Goar in Germany. Initially built in 1245 as a sort of medieval "toll booth" levying charges on ships that sailed along the Rhine, Burg Rheinfels was hated by the citizens of the Rhineland. So much so... Read More

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Burgkloster

The Burgkloster was a medieval monastery turned poorhouse, court and Nazi prison.

The Burgkloster (Castle Monastery) in Lubeck is considered to be one of the most important medieval monasteries in Germany. Established in 1229, the Burgkloster served as a monastery until the Protestant Reformation (circa sixteenth century) after which it was used as a poorhouse until the nineteenth century. Under the Third Reich,... Read More

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Burgtor

The Burgtor is one of only two surviving medieval gates in Lubeck.

The Burgtor (Castle Gate) is one of only two of Lubeck’s original four medieval gates which survive. The oldest parts of Lubeck’s Burgtor date back to the thirteenth century, whilst its tower is a later addition. The other - and more well-known - remaining gate is known as Holstentor. The Burgtor... Read More

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Celtic hillfort of Otzenhausen

The Celtic hillfort of Otzenhausen contains the remains of an ancient fortification in Germany, thought to have been constructed by the Treveri tribe.

The Celtic hillfort of Otzenhausen contains the remains of an ancient fortification in Germany, thought to have been constructed by the Treveri tribe. The hillfort is positioned at the edge of the Hunsrück Nature Park, and their considerable height and location gives them a dominant view of the surrounding area -... Read More

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Charlottenburg Palace

Berlin's largest royal estate, Charlottenburg Palace was finished in 1713 in a Baroque style, as a summer getaway for the first queen of Prussia, Sophie Charlotte, wife of Frederick I.

Berlin's largest royal estate, Charlottenburg Palace was built in 1713 as a summer getaway for the first queen of Prussia, Sophie Charlotte, wife of Frederick I. Noted by many as the most beautiful palace in Berlin, the style of Charlottenburg Palace is predominantly baroque, reflecting the taste during the period when... Read More

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Checkpoint Charlie

Checkpoint Charlie was an important crossing point in the Berlin Wall between the east and west of the city. It is one of the most popular historic sites in Germany for tourists to visit.

Checkpoint Charlie was an important crossing point in the Berlin Wall, which separated East and West Berlin from 1961 to 1989. The Berlin Wall and Checkpoint Charlie were prominent symbols of the Cold War. At the time, West Berlin was controlled by the American, British and French forces and East Berlin... Read More

Dachau Concentration Camp

Dachau Concentration Camp was a Nazi concentration camp in Germany.

Dachau Concentration Camp (KZ-Gedenkstätte Dachau) was one of the first of many concentration camps set up by the Nazis to imprison and murder certain groups as part of their campaign of genocide. Founded on 22 March 1933, a mere few weeks after Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany, Dachau Concentration... Read More

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German Resistance Memorial Centre

The German Resistance Memorial Centre in Berlin commemorates those who rose up against the Nazis, particularly in the July 20 Plot.

The German Resistance Memorial Centre or “Gedenkstätte Deutscher Widerstand” in Berlin in Germany is a monument and museum to those who fought against the National Socialist government led by Adolf Hitler – the Nazis – before and during World War II. In particular, it commemorates the attempted assassination of Hitler... Read More

Hassenhausen Museum

Hassenhausen Museum in Auerstedt is a museum of the 1806 Battle of Jena-Auerstedt of the Napoleonic Wars.

Hassenhausen Museum in Germany chronicles the battles of Jena and Auerstadt (often jointly known as the Battle of Jena-Auerstedt). These battles of the Napoleonic Wars saw the Prussian Army defeated by the army of Napoleon I of France in two locations on 14 October 1806, confirming Napoleon’s military might and... Read More

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Haus der Wannsee-Konferenz

Haus der Wannsee-Konferenz was the site where the Nazis planned the extermination of the Jews known as the Holocaust.

Haus der Wannsee-Konferenz was the site of the infamous Wannsee Conference in which the Nazis planned how to carry out the “Final Solution”, the plan to murder the Jewish population of Eastern Europe. On 20 January 1942, fifteen senior members of the Nazi government and of the SS met at Haus... Read More

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Heiliger Sand

Heiliger Sand in Worms in Germany is the oldest Jewish cemetery in Europe.

Heiliger Sand, meaning Holy Sands, is the Worms Jewish Cemetery. With its oldest gravestone dating back to 1076, Heiliger Sand is Europe’s oldest Jewish cemetery although it is no longer in use, the last burial having occurred in 1940.... Read More

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Herrenchiemsee Palace

A stunning 19th century Bavarian palace, located on its very own 230-hectare island, modelled on the Palace of Versailles.

Herrenchiemsee Palace is a luxurious 19th Century Bavarian palace, modelled on France’s Palace of Versailles, which sits atop its very own 230-hectare island. Initially intended to serve no functional purpose other than as a shrine to absolute monarchy, Herrenchiemsee New Palace was modelled on the Palace of Versailles. Initial work on... Read More

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Hohenzollern Castle

Hohenzollern Castle is a truly impressive 19th century castle and popular tourist destination located 40 miles south of Stuttgart.

Hohenzollern Castle is a truly impressive 19th century castle and popular tourist destination located 40 miles south of Stuttgart. There were in fact three castles built on the Hohenzollern site. The first was built in the early 11th century but this castle was completely destroyed in 1423 after a ten-month siege. A... Read More

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Holstentor

Holstentor is a picturesque medieval gate which houses the city museum of Lubeck. UNESCO listed.

If Holstentor looks familiar, this might be because you’ve glimpsed it on a German 2 Euro coin. Of course, with its fairytale appearance, Holstentor, often known as Holsten Tor or Holsten Gate, looks like the very image of an ideal castle. Built between 1464 and 1478, Holstentor was part of the... Read More

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Jakobikirche

Jakobikirche was built in 1334 and now represents one of the best preserved medieval churches in Lubeck.

Jakobikirche (St. Jacob's Church) was built in 1334 and now represents one of Lubeck’s best preserved medieval churches, having managed to emerge relatively unscathed from the air raids of World War II.... Read More

Jena Battlefield

Jena Battlefield was the site of a Prussian defeat in 1806 during the Napoleonic Wars.

Jena Battlefield in Thuringia, Germany was the site of the Battle of Jena during the Napoleonic Wars. On 14 October 1806, the Prussian army of Frederick William III together with Saxony troops met that of Napoleon’s French troops at Jena in Saxony, being modern day Germany. In what is now known... Read More

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Jewish Museum - Berlin

The Jewish Museum in Berlin explores the history of Germany’s Jewish community.

The Jewish Museum in Berlin in Germany chronicles the history of German Jews over the course of two millennia. Housed in an incredibly modern building, the Berlin Jewish Museum displays historical objects, documents, photographs, multimedia presentations and even computer games relating to different periods of Jewish history and culture. The exhibitions... Read More

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Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church

Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church is a ruined 19th century church and one of the most well-known landmarks in Germany of its time, particularly in Berlin.

Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church is a Romanesque style church which was originally built in the 1890’s and dedicated to Kaiser William I by his grandson Kaiser William II. Although the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church was severely damaged in a bombing raid in 1943, during World War II, remnants of its original architecture... Read More

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Karl Marx Haus

Karl Marx Haus in Trier was the birthplace of the father of Marxism and stands amongst the more popular things to do in Germany.

Karl Marx Haus, translated as Karl Marx House, was the place where the revolutionary communist philosopher Karl Marx was born on 5 May 1818. Karl Marx was one of the most influential political thinkers of his time. His theory of Marxism, in which the working classes or “Proletariat” must struggle to... Read More

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Konigstein Fortress

Konigstein Fortress in Dresden has been everything from a stronghold to a World War II prisoner of war camp.

Konigstein Fortress or Festung Königstein is a famous fortified structure near Dresden, Germany which has never been taken. It is unclear when Konigstein Fortress was first constructed, but mentions of a castle on the site go back to 1233. As a castle, Konigstein was used as a stronghold and a sixteenth... Read More

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Liebfrauen

Liebfrauen is a thirteenth century UNESCO-listed gothic church in Trier.

Liebfrauen in Trier, translated as the Church of Our Lady, is a medieval cross-shaped church built upon the southern ruins of a vast Roman church built in 326 AD by Constantine the Great. It is near Trier Cathedral, which was also built over these remains. Completed in approximately 1260, Liebfrauen is... Read More

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Linderhof Palace

Unique in design and style, the ornate 19th century Linderhof Palace exhibits exquisite Rococo ornamentation and is surrounded by beautiful landscaped gardens.

Linderhof Palace in Bavaria is a grand country home created by King Ludwig II of Bavaria – one of several grand building projects the king undertook. The only palace that Ludwig lived to see completed, Linderhof Palace’s origins are one of continual building and remodelling. Originally a hunting lodge owned... Read More

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Lubeck Cathedral

Lubeck Cathedral is one of the oldest buildings in this UNESCO listed city centre.

Lubeck Cathedral (Lubecker Dom) is one of the oldest buildings in this UNESCO listed city centre. Built in 1137 by Henry the Lion (Henry III) of the Welf dynasty, it was constructed in a Romanesque style. Severely damages by the World War II air raids of 1942, Lubeck Cathedral has since... Read More

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Lubeck Town Hall

Lubeck Town Hall is a picturesque medieval building which began as a 13th century cloth hall.

Lubeck Town Hall (Lubecker Rathaus) is a picturesque medieval building which began as a thirteenth century cloth hall. The initial three buildings of Lubeck Town Hall were added to at several stages over the centuries, but several original aspects can still be seen, including the gables and parts of the facade. Now... Read More

Lutzen Battlefield

Lutzen Battlefield was the site of an important battle of the Thirty Years’ War in 1632 and a Napoleonic victory in 1813.

At Lutzen Battlefield on 2 May 1813, Napoleon’s forces defeated the combined forces of the Prussian and Russian armies. This victory at the Battle of Lutzen was all the more remarkable given the depleted nature of Napoleon’s army following their incursion into Russia. Lutzen Battlefield was also the site of an... Read More

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Marienkirche

Marienkirche in Lubeck is Germany’s third largest church.

Marienkirche (St. Mary’s Church) in Lubeck is Germany’s third largest church and part of this city’s illustrious history as a former member of the Hanseatic League. Taking some 100 years to complete and consecrated in 1350, Marienkirche may not be Lubeck’s oldest church (that’s probably the cathedral), but it is its... Read More

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Munich Frauenkirche

The Munich Frauenkirche is one of the city’s most iconic historic sites.

The Munich Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady) is one of the city’s most iconic sites. Begun in 1468 over the site of an earlier church, the Munich Frauenkirche was consecrated in 1494. However, it was not until the sixteenth century that Frauenkirche got its most famous additions, a pair of onion-dome... Read More

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Neuschwanstein Castle

A fairy-tale castle built for an introverted and reclusive king, Neuschwanstein Castle’s idyllic mountainous setting attracts millions of tourists.

A fairy-tale fortress built for an introverted and reclusive king, Neuschwanstein Castle was built in the 19th century for Bavaria’s notorious King Ludwig II and is now a prominent tourist attraction which draws vast numbers of visitors every year. After Ludwig’s submission to Prussia in 1866 the king focused his attention... Read More

Nuremberg Castle

Every Holy Roman Emperor between 1050 and 1571 is said to have stayed at Nuremberg Castle, which is one of the grander medieval historic places in Germany.

Nuremberg Castle (Nürnberger Burg) is a medieval castle - or rather a castle complex - made up of three parts. Whilst it is unclear as to exactly when Nuremberg Castle was first constructed, by the mid-eleventh century, it was a prestigious residence. In fact, between 1050 and 1571, every Holy... Read More

Nymphenburg Palace

Nymphenburg Palace is a grand baroque palace in Munich and one the city’s most famous sites.

Nymphenburg Palace (Schloss Nymphenburg) is a grand baroque palace in Munich and one the city’s most famous sites. Originally built in the seventeenth century, Nymphenburg Palace was constructed in celebration the birth of Max Emanuel, the son and heir of Bavarian Elector Ferdinand Maria and his wife, Henriette Adelaide of... Read More

Porta Nigra

Porta Nigra is a late second century Roman gate in Trier in Germany.

Porta Nigra, translated as the “Black Gate” is a magnificently well-preserved second century Roman gate in Trier, Germany. Originally constructed of large blocks of light sandstone, the darkening of its appearance by the Middle Ages led to it being called Porta Nigra, with its original name unknown. By the mid-second century... Read More

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Reichstag

Amongst the things to do in Germany relating to its modern history is a visit to the Reichstag Building. The seat of the German Government from 1894 to 1933, it is now the seat of the German Bundestag.

The Reichstag Building started its life in 1894, when it served as the seat of the German Parliament, then known as the Reichstag. Designed by architect Paul Wallot during the reign of Emperor Wilhelm I, the Reichstag building contained several pioneering architectural elements, including a steel and glass copula... Read More

Rheinisches Landesmuseum

The Rheinisches Landesmuseum chronicles the history of Trier and the region as far back as the Stone Age.

The Rheinisches Landesmuseum (Rhenish State Museum) of Trier is a large archaeological museum which exhibits pieces from throughout the history of the city and its region. Starting with the Stone Age and up to the medieval era, the Rheinisches Landesmuseum offers an overview of the development of Trier and its surrounding... Read More

Romano-Germanic Museum - Cologne

The Romano-Germanic Museum is a museum of Ancient Roman history in Cologne.

The Romano-Germanic Museum (Römisch-Germanisches Museum) in Cologne houses an extensive collection of ancient Roman finds from around Germany, particularly from the local area which was occupied by the Romans for a considerable time. During the Roman era, Cologne was known as “Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium” and was the capital of the... Read More

Romerbrucke

Still in use today, Romerbrucke is a 2nd century UNESCO-listed Roman bridge in Trier.

Romerbrucke is an ancient Roman bridge which crosses the Mosel River in Trier in Germany. Built between 144 and 152 AD, much of the original structure of Romerbrucke still survives, although some of it – notably the road and its arches – date back to the eighteenth century. Still an active... Read More

Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp

Sachsenhausen was a Nazi concentration camp 35km outside of Berlin during the Second World War.

Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp (KZ-Sachsenhausen) was used by the Nazis between 1936 and 1945. Its primary function was for the imprisonment and execution - or extermination - of Jews and political dissidents, including many Dutch freedom fighters, Russian prisoners of war and even some political leaders from invaded countries. Its prime location... Read More

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Soviet Memorial Treptow

Located in Berlin’s Treptower Park, the Soviet Memorial was designed by architect Yakov Belopolsky in order to remember the Soviet soldiers who were killed in the 1945 Battle of Berlin.

The beautiful Treptower Park just south of Berlin’s city centre is home to Germany’s largest Soviet memorial, a solemn and moving site, which serves to both commemorate those lost in the Battle of Berlin, and house a cemetery for 5,000 of the fallen soldiers. Near to the river Spree, the park... Read More

St Matthias Abbey - Trier

St Matthias Abbey houses the grave of its namesake, the apostle, St Mathias and is home to a cemetery dating back to Roman times.

St Matthias Abbey (Benediktiner abtei St. Matthias) is a twelfth century church and the site of the tomb of the apostle St Matthias, who succeeded Judas. Also located at St Matthias Abbey, which was consecrated in 1148, is a Roman cemetery housing the final resting places of the first bishops of... Read More

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The Altes Museum

The Altes Museum in Berlin contains a collection of ancient Greek and Roman artifacts.

The Altes Museum is part of Germany’s National Museum and is located in Berlin. Displaying part of the National Museum’s collection of classical antiquities, even the building of the Altes Museum has been built in a style inspired by Ancient Greece. One of the main collections at the Altes Museum is... Read More

The Barbara Baths - Trier

The Barbara Baths were a second century baths complex of Roman Trier. UNESCO listed.

The Barbara Baths (Barbarathermen) in Trier are a set of ruins of a second century Roman baths complex. A little of the original Barbara Baths can be seen above ground today, but this pales in comparison to the Imperial Baths of Trier. This is due to the fact that most... Read More

The Battle of the Nations Monument

The Battle of the Nations Monument commemorates the 1813 Napoleonic Wars battle in which the French emperor suffered one of his greatest defeats.

The Battle of the Nations Monument near Leipzig was dedicated one hundred years after the momentous Battle of Leipzig, also known as the Battle of the Nations, took place. One of the major battles of the Napoleonic Wars, the Battle of the Nations was fought from 16 to 18 October 1813... Read More

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The Berlin Flak Tower

One of the more hidden World War II historic sites in Germany is the Berlin Flak Tower, a bunker and anti-aircraft tower built under Hitler’s orders.

The Berlin Flak Tower in Humboldthain Park is a seven storey bunker originally built under Hitler’s orders to protect Berlin from aerial attacks during the Second World War. In fact, in 1940, Hitler planned to build six such flak towers. Three flak towers were constructed and, after the war, the only... Read More

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The DDR Museum

The DDR Museum examines what life was like within the former German Democratic Republic, and provides an incredibly vivid look into this 40-year period of German history.

One of Berlin's newest sites, the DDR Museum examines what life was like within the former German Democratic Republic, and provides an incredibly vivid look into this 40-year period. The museum is a wholly interactive experience, wherein visitors enter a model of a GDR estate. Through impressive interactive exhibitions, the DDR... Read More

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The Holocaust Memorial - Berlin

The Holocaust Memorial in Berlin commemorates the European Jews murdered under the Nazis.

The Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, also known as the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, is an installation commemorating the genocide of the Jewish people perpetrated under Adolf Hitler and the Nazis. The Holocaust was an attempt by Hitler to exterminate the Jews and any other people who he considered... Read More

The Munich Residence

The Munich Residence was a focal point of Bavarian power for over four centuries.

The Munich Residence (Residenz Munchen) was a focal point of Bavarian power for over four centuries. Begun in 1385, the Munich Residence was initially a small castle, but slowly grew to be one of Germany’s most impressive palaces. From 1508, the Munich Residence took its place in the history books as... Read More

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The Neues Museum

The Neues Museum in Berlin has a vast collection including Prehistoric, Ancient Egyptian, Roman and Greek works.

The Neues Museum in Berlin is part of Germany’s National Museum and, following a reconstruction project, is now the home of the Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection, the Collection of Classical Antiquities and the Museum of Prehistory and Early History. Within the Neues Museum’s Ancient Egyptian collection, one of its most... Read More

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The New Synagogue

Once a working synagogue, the New Synagogue in Berlin is today used as an informative museum, with the building standing as a great representation of eastern Moorish architecture.

The New Synagogue in Berlin was originally constructed between 1859 and 1866, with the Moorish-inspired designs created by German architect Eduard Knoblauch. Today, the synagogue is used as a museum, the Centrum Judaicum, but during its active years it was the largest Jewish place of worship in Germany and remains... Read More

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The Pergamon Museum

The Pergamon Museum in Berlin displays ancient exhibitions and those of Muslim art.

The Pergamon Museum is a large and varied museum in Berlin housing three different exhibitions. One of the collections at the Pergamon Museum is part of the Classical Antiquities, known as the Antikensammlung. This collection includes mostly Greek and some Roman pieces ranging from jewellery to sarcophagi, sculptures and even remains... Read More

Trier Cathedral

Trier Cathedral is a mostly medieval, UNESCO-listed church with a history dating back to Roman times.

Trier Cathedral, called Trierer Dom in German, is the main church of the city of Trier. The site of Trier Cathedral has a rich Christian history dating back to at least 270 AD, when worshippers attended what was probably the first church to have existed at this location – a... Read More

Trier Roman Amphitheatre

Trier Roman Amphitheatre is a well preserved UNESCO site in use as early as the 1st century.

Trier Roman Amphitheatre may have been constructed as early as the first century AD, but was certainly in use by the second century. Able to hold around 20,000 spectators, Trier Roman Amphitheatre would have been the site of fierce gladiatorial battles, also involving animals. In fact, tunnels have been found under... Read More

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Würzburg Residence

The Würzburg Residence was built for Johann Philipp Franz von Schönborn, Prince-Bishop of Würzburg in the 1700s and is one of Europe’s most stunning and lavishly opulent Baroque palaces.

Called the ‘castle above all castles’, the Würzburg Residence was principally designed by little-known court architect Balthasar Neumann and commissioned by Johann Philipp Franz von Schönborn, Prince-Bishop of Würzburg. Constructed between 1720 and 1744, it is a perfect representation of South German Baroque-era architecture and one of Europe’s most extraordinary... Read More

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Weißensee Cemetery

The largest Jewish cemetery in Europe, the Weißensee Cemetery in Berlin is home to about 115,000 graves. It is popular with visitors due to its beautiful art nouveau mausoleums and mourning hall.

Berlin is home to a number of cemeteries and all are worth visiting, but without doubt the most hauntingly beautiful is Weißensee Cemetery. Located in Berlin’s Weißensee district, it was established in 1880 and walking through you’ll find stunning art nouveau mausoleums, many of which were created by Berlin’s affluent... Read More

Weiden Roman Burial Chamber

The Weiden Roman Burial Chamber is an Ancient Roman tomb on the outskirts of modern day Cologne.

The Weiden Roman Burial Chamber (Römische Grabkammer in Weiden) is a second century tomb found on the outskirts of modern day Cologne. As was typical at the time, the Roman Burial Chamber in Weiden was built on the way out of the city, then known as Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium. Elaborate and... Read More

Westwall Museum

The Westwall Museum allows visitors to enter tunnels which formed part of this renowned line of World War II fortifications.

The Westwall Museum or Siegfried Line Museum near the western German village of Niedersimten allows visitors to enter a warren of tunnels which formed part of this renowned line of World War II fortifications. Two decommissioned tanks guard the entrance to the Westwall Museum.... Read More

Worms Synagogue

Worms Synagogue is built on the site of two former synagogues destroyed during the Crusades and on Kristallnacht.

Worms Synagogue is a relatively new synagogue, but is built next to the remains of one that was completed in 1175. This twelfth century synagogue was burnt down as part of the World War II Nazi Kristallnacht in 1938, in which hundreds of Jewish sites were destroyed. Prior to the Second... Read More

Photo by By Veles (cc)

Xanten Archaeological Park

Xanten Archaeological Park houses the remains of the former Roman settlement of Colonia Ulpia Traiana. It is one of the best preserved Roman historic sites in Germany.

Xanten Archaeological Park (Archaologischer Park Xanten) houses the remains of the former Roman settlement of Colonia Ulpia Traiana. The area of the park was first garrisoned by Roman legions in around 13 BC and soon flourished. Roads and a harbour were built as was a vast military camp and,... Read More

Photo by Anna (cc)

Zionskirche

Built in 1872, the Zionskirche is an impressive 19th century historic church in Berlin and a beautiful example of the neo-romantic architecture.

The Zionskirche is a picturesque 19th century historic church in Berlin and an exquisite example of the neo-romantic architecture. Built in 1872, the Zionskirche is representative of the Historicist movement of its time, and was incredibly important before the fall of the Berlin Wall as a meeting point for opposition groups,... Read More

Zwernitz Castle

Zwernitz Castle is an 11th century castle, once the hereditary seat of the Upper Franconian Walpodes situated in the beautiful village of Wonsees in south-eastern Germany.

First documented in 1156, Zwernitz Castle in the beautifully quiet village of Wonsees in south-eastern Germany was once the hereditary seat of the Upper Franconian Walpodes, a prominent familial line who were present in Bavaria from the 10th century. The structures you can still see today – the keep and tithe... Read More