Haidra

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Haidra HISTORY

One of the earliest Roman settlements in North Africa, Haidra in Tunisia contains the remains of the Roman city of Ammaedara. Well off the beaten track, Haidra – also called Hydrah – attracts few tourists and even the archaeological excavations have been few and far between.

Founded in the first century AD, Ammaedara was originally a legionary outpost, used by the Third Legion Augusta during their campaign against the rebellious Numidian leader Tacfarinas – a deserter from the Roman auxiliaries who led his people in an uprising against Rome during the reign of the Emperor Tiberius.

After the defeat of the rebellion, Ammaedara was settled by veterans from the campaign and grew into a thriving Roman city. Indeed, remains of the cemetery of the 3rd legion have been identified on outskirts of the site.

It is unclear as to whether a pre-Roman settlement existed at Haidra. Though the foundations of a Punic temple to Ba'al-Hamon were found near the site, there is little additional evidence of a major settlement.

The Romans ruled the region until the Vandal invasions of the 5th century AD and the ruins of Haidra contain evidence of the period of Vandal rule as well as the subsequent Byzantine period which followed after Justinian’s successful re-conquest.

Today Haïdra contains a number of interesting ruins dating from the various periods in the city’s history. Perhaps the most impressive is the imposing Byzantine fortress - built around 550 AD on the orders of Justinian, it acted as a defensive stronghold for the newly conquered Byzantine lands.

Dating to around the same period is the Church of Melleus which is in a reasonable state of preservation with a number of surviving columns and interesting inscriptions from the 6th and 7th centuries on the paving stones. Evidence of the Vandal period survives in the form of the Vandal Chapel - dating to the reigns of King Thrasamund and King Hilderic in the early 6th century AD.

Of the other ruins at Haïdra, the most prominent is the Arch of Septimius Severus. Built in 195 AD it remains very well preserved with decorative markings still intact. However, one of the best places to actually explore is the underground bath complex, a series of reasonably intact bath chambers and corridors which you can still wander around freely.

Scant remains of the original market and theatre can also be seen as well as just one surviving column from the ancient temple that stood on the capitol. Other elements to explore at Haïdra include the Roman cemetery and the three mausoleum towers – impressive structures that have survived the ages in pretty good condition.

Haidra TOURIST INFORMATION

DIRECTIONS TO Haidra

Haidra is located near the modern town of Haydrah which lies near the Tunisian-Algerian border. The ruins are located along the road just to the east of the modern town - the P4 which runs from Haydrah to Kalaat Khasbah. Shared taxis run from Thala and Kalaat Khasbah (which has trains running from Tunis). Buses to Haïdra also run from Kasserine.

LOCAL AMENITIES

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Haidra OPENING TIMES AND TICKET PRICES

Open at all reasonable hours. Entry is free at time of writing.

Haidra HISTORIC INFORMATION

NAME: Haidra
CONTINENT: AFRICA
Alt Name: Ammaedara
Country: Tunisia
Period: Ancient Rome
Sub-Region: Northern Africa
Date: 0AD - 99AD
City/Town: Haidra
Figure: Septimius Severus
Resorts: Haidra,

CONTACT DETAILS

Haidra ADDRESS

Haïdra, near Haydrah, Al Qasrayn, Tunisia

Haidra PHONE NUMBER

Contact local tourist board

Haidra EMAIL

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Haidra
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Just as empires rise and fall so do entry fees and opening hours! While we work as hard as we can to ensure the information provided here about Haidra is as accurate as possible, the changing nature of certain elements mean we can't absolutely guarantee that these details won't become a thing of the past. If you know of any information on this page that needs updating you can add a comment above or e-mail us.

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