Historic Sites in Serbia

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There's a host of top Historic Sites in Serbia to visit and among the very best are Petrovaradin Fortress, Sirmium Imperial Palace and the Monument to the Unknown Hero.

We’ve put together an experts guide to Serbian cultural locations and monuments, with our top places to visit as well as a full list of Historic Sites in Serbia, which shouldn’t be ignored if you have the time.

What are the best Historic Sites in Serbia?

1. Petrovaradin Fortress

Petrovaradin Fortress is a seventeenth century fortified structure in Novi Sad, Serbia. In fact, there has been a fortress on the site since the Bronze Age and the first fortifications on the site of Petrovaradin Fortress were built by the Romans and expanded by Cisterian monks in the thirteenth century. 

Today, Petrovaradin Fortress is a popular tourist destination and visitors can tour its walls as well as its buildings. One of the most popular aspects s its catacombs, which are believed contain the riches of Serbia’s medieval leaders.

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2. Sirmium Imperial Palace

The Sirmium Imperial Palace complex in Serbia contains the remains of a Roman imperial palace which was home to several Roman Emperors, including Constantine I. Built at the end of the third or beginning of the fourth century AD, the complex has now been opened to the public as a museum. 

Today the Sirmium Imperial Palace complex is one of the most important Roman sites in Serbia and is a testament to the central role this area played in the middle and late Roman Empire.

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3. Serbian Monument to the Unknown Hero

The Serbian Monument to the Unknown Hero was built in memory of the victims of World War I as well as the Balkan Wars. It is located on the former site of the medieval Zrnov fortress.

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4. Zvornik Fortress

Zvornik Castle (Bosnian: Kula grad, English: Tower City) is a medieval castle located in Zvornik, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on the mountain Mlađevac overlooking Drina Valley. Zvornik fortress is 147 metres (482 ft) above sea level.

Based on Wikipedia content (CC BY-SA 3.0)

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5. Srebrenica Genocide Memorial

The Srebrenica Genocide Memorial, officially known as the Srebrenica–Potočari Memorial and Cemetery for the Victims of the 1995 Genocide, is the memorial-cemetery complex in Srebrenica set up to honour the victims of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide. The victims—at least 8,372 of them—were mainly males, mostly Bosniaks and some Croats.As of May 2017, 6,938 genocide victims have been identified through DNA analysis (conducted by the International Commission on Missing Persons) of human remains recovered from mass graves and 6,504 (as of July 2017) victims have been buried.

Based on Wikipedia content (CC BY-SA 3.0)

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6. Papraća Monastery

The Papraća Monastery (Serbian Cyrillic: Манастир Папраћа) is a Serbian Orthodox monastery dedicated to the Annunciation and located in the village of Papraća at the source of the same-named river, near Šekovići in eastern Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The date of its foundation is unknown, but contemporary Ottoman documents give evidence that the monastery existed in the first half of the 16th century.

The monks of Papraća had contacts with Russian rulers in the 16th and 17th centuries, and they often travelled to Russia to raise funds and donations. In 1551, the monks travelled to Moscow through Volhynia in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, where they received a manuscript Gospel Book from Prince Dymitr Sanguszko, who was a grandson of Serbian Despot Jovan Branković. Several years later, also in Volhynia, another group of Papraća monks received a psalter from a man named Nikola the Serb. In 1559, Papraća monks helped build a new church at the Tronoša Monastery in western Serbia. In 1645, Russian Tsar Aleksey Mikhailovich granted a charter permitting the monks of Papraća to collect donations in Russia once every eight years. They managed to travel to Russia even during the Great Turkish War (1683–1699).The monastery was abandoned and ruined after the Austro-Turkish War of 1716–18. Its church was rebuilt in 1853, after the construction works were allowed by Ottoman authorities. The rebuilding was helped by funds from Serbs of Sarajevo. The church was further refurbished in the following years, and it was consecrated in 1869. Monastic life was restored in Papraća in 1880. During World War II, the monastery was ruined and its valuables were stolen. It was partially repaired in 1954, mostly through efforts by nun Varvara Božić from the Tavna Monastery. After further renovations, it was consecrated on 21 September 1975. The Papraća Monastery was designated as a National Monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 2005.

Based on Wikipedia content (CC BY-SA 3.0)

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Our database of Historic Sites in Serbia is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. So, if you know of other Serbian cultural locations and monuments, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by contacting us today.