Crusader Ruins and Crusades Sites

If you’re looking to explore Crusader ruins and Crusades sites and want to find the best places to view the history of the Crusades then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s a great selection of Crusader ruins and Crusades sites and you can plan some fantastic things to see on your trips. Once you’ve explored the list of Crusades sites and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring Crusader ruins and Crusades sites.

Our database of the historic sites of the Crusades is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other Crusader sites, remains or ruins, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

Crusades: Site Index

Photo by Shayan (USA) (cc)

Acre

One of the most famous Crusader sites, Acre is a UNESCO listed site of a city in Israel fortified by the Crusaders and the Ottomans.

Acre or “Akko” is an ancient city in Israel which has been almost continuously inhabited since at least 3000 BC, during the Early Bronze Age. Today, the Old City of Acre is a UNESCO World Heritage site, with a myriad of ruins representing the many civilisations that ruled the area... Read More

Photo by Dale Gillard (cc)

Ajlun Castle

A grand medieval castle commissioned by Saladin, Ajlun Castle is an excellent example of Ayyubid-era fortifications which is now a tourist attraction and museum.

A grand medieval castle commissioned by Saladin and built by his nephew Izz al-Din Usama, Ajlun Castle was a fortress designed to strike fear in the heart of the Franks. While the crusaders in Levant played cat and mouse with the great Saladin, his generals were preparing for warfare on their... Read More

Photo by אסף.צ (cc)

Arsuf

Arsuf contains the remains of a Crusader castle once occupied by the Knights Hospitaller. With special events for children, this can be one of the most fun Crusades sites to visit with a family.

Arsuf, also known as Apollonia, contains the remains of an ancient settlement on the Israeli coast that has stood for over 1,000 years. Arsuf is best known for the remains of a once-mighty Crusader castle which was once home to the Knights Hospitaller, but the site also contains remnants from... Read More

Photo by Historvius

Asenova Fortress

Asenova Fortress is a pretty medieval fortress near Plovdiv, Bulgaria, once occupied by Crusaders.

Asenova Fortress (Asenova Krepost) is a pretty medieval fortress near Plovdiv. Some evidence shows that the area of Asenova Fortress has been inhabited by a variety of people dating back to ancient times, including the Thracians and Romans as well as the Byzantines. Whilst it is said t have been... Read More

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Beit She’an

Beit Shean is an immensely impressive archaeological site with remains dating back mostly to the Roman and Byzantine period.

The ancient city of Beit She’an in the northern Jordan Valley is an immensely impressive archaeological site with remains dating back mostly to the Roman and Byzantine period. The site itself has an extensive history dating back to around the fifth millennium BC and was a significant settlement... Read More

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Bodrum Castle

Bodrum Castle is a 15th century citadel built by Christian knights and houses the Museum of Underwater Archaeology.

Bodrum Castle (Bodrum Kalesi), also known as The Castle of St. Peter, in Bodrum, Turkey was built by the Knights Hospitaller in 1402 in order to offer protection from the invading Seljuk Turks. Constructed according to the highest standards at the time, it remained an important Christian stronghold for over a... Read More

Photo by HBarrison (cc)

Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology

The Museum of Underwater Archaeology in Bodrum is located in Bodrum Castle, one a Crusader fortress.

The Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology in Turkey exhibits historical treasures uncovered through underwater excavations. Some of the treasures at the Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology include the finds from the Bronze Age Uluburun Shipwreck, believed to have sunk in 14th century BC and discoveries from a 5th century ship, most... Read More

Byblos

A lesser-known Crusades Site Byblos is one of the world’s oldest continuously inhabited cities and contains the ruins of a 12th century Crusader Castle.

Byblos (Jbail) in Lebanon is one of the world’s oldest continuously inhabited cities, as attested by the incredibly diverse ages of its ruins. Thought to have first inhabited sometime around the fifth millennium BC, Byblos began as a Neolithic village of fisherman. Over time, Byblos would, amongst other things,... Read More

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Caesarea

Caesarea in Israel was an Ancient Roman city later conquered by the Crusaders and still containing the original Crusader fortifications.

Caesarea or “Keysarya” was an Ancient Roman city which is now a large archaeological site in Israel. It is believed that the city of Caesarea was initially founded atop the ruins of Straton's Tower, a third century BC Phoenician port city. Conquered by King Alexander Jannaeus of the Hasmonean Kingdom in... Read More

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Castelo de Almourol

The Castle of Almourol is a medieval castle built by the Knights Templar on an islet in the Tagus River.

Almourol Castle was built in the 12th century, on an islet in the middle of the Tagus River, as part of the defensive line held by the Knights Templar during the Portuguese Reconquista. Although the site of Almourol Castle had been used as a fortification since at least Roman times the... Read More

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Church of the Annunciation - Nazareth

One of many religious Crusades sites, the Church of the Annunciation is believed to be the site where Gabriel told Mary she was to conceive the son of G-d.

The Church of the Annunciation, often called the Basilica of the Annunciation, is located in Nazareth on the site where it is believed that the angel Gabriel told Mary that she was to miraculously conceive the son of G-d. This holy Christian event is known as the Annunciation. While the structure... Read More

Photo by See The Holy Land (cc)

Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Built on the believed site of the crucifixion of Jesus, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is possibly the holiest site in Christianity. The current structure mostly dates to the Crusader period.

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem is holiest site in Christianity due the fact that it encompasses what are thought to be the last five stations travelled through by Christ, ending in his crucifixion. Built in 325/6AD by Roman Emperor Constantine I (the first such emperor to convert to Christianity), the... Read More

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Citadel of Salah Ed-Din

One of many more isolated Crusader sites, the Citadel of Salah Ed-Din is a Crusader-era castle situated in Syria, designated a World Heritage site in 2006.

The Citadel of Salah Ed-Din, also known as Saladin Castle and Saone, is a partly-preserved fortress in Syria which is an interesting example of Crusader-era fortifications. The site has been used as a fortification for many centuries, and is thought to have first been occupied by the Phoenicians and later by... Read More

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Fort Saint Jean

Built on the site of a fourteenth century complex built by the Knights Hospitallers, Fort Saint Jean was used as a prison during the French Revolution.

Fort Saint Jean was one of two fortresses built by King Louis XIV in Marseille in the seventeenth century. Construction began in the 1660’s under the guise of wanting to protect Marseille from outside attack. In fact, the purpose of Fort Saint Jean was to subdue a rebellion by the... Read More

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Grandmasters Palace - Rhodes

One of the most famous Crusader sites, the Grandmasters Palace of Rhodes was the base of the Knights Hospitaller of St John.

The Grandmasters Palace of Rhodes was the palace of the Knights Hospitaller of St John. Dating to the fourteenth century (circa 1309), the Grandmasters Palace would be the base of this famous Christian and military order until Rhodes was captured by the Ottomans in 1522. Under this empire the Grandmasters Palace... Read More

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Grandmasters Palace - Valletta

The Grandmasters Palace in Valletta has been the seat of power in Malta since the sixteenth century. One of the most important latter Crusader sites.

The Grandmasters Palace in Valletta has been the seat of power in Malta since the sixteenth century. It was in 1571 that the Knights Hospitaller of St John made the Grandmasters Palace their base, a role which it would fulfil until 1798, when this religious and military order left Malta. At... Read More

Kerak Castle

An impressive 12th century Crusader castle in Jordan, the remains of the fortification of Kerak are an awesome and slightly forbidding sight even today.

Kerak Castle is an impressive 12th century Crusader-era fortification located to the south of Amman, Jordan, on the ancient King's Highway. Today the castle operates as a visitor attraction and contains a maze of corridors and chambers within the imposing fortifications. Described by a contemporary adventurer as "the most marvellous, most... Read More

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Kolossi Castle

Among the more obscure Crusader sites, Kolossi Castle was a fortification of the Knights Hospitallers built in the thirteenth century.

Kolossi Castle was originally a thirteenth century Frankish fortification near Limassol in Cyprus. Constructed by the Knights Hospitallers in 1210, Kolossi Castle almost exclusively remained in their possession until it was destroyed by Mameluke raids in 1525/6. The only interruption occurred between 1306 and 1313, when it was taken over by... Read More

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Krak des Chevaliers

Perhaps the best preserved example of a Crusader fortress in existence today, the magnificent fortress of Krak des Chevaliers is a stunning example of Medieval military architecture.

Krak des Chevaliers is a stunning example of Crusader-era military architecture and was the headquarters of the famous Knights Hospitallier during the 12th and 13th centuries. It is perhaps the best preserved example of a Crusader fortress in existence today, and is an awe-inspiring example of medieval military architecture. Built to withstand a... Read More

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Petra

Not necessarily known as being among the Crusades sites, Petra was actually a Crusader stronghold for a number of years.

Petra is an iconic ancient site in southern Jordan. A secret to all but the Bedouins until 1812, Petra’s incredible monuments are now considered to be one of the wonders of the world. Petra was established by the once nomadic Kingdom of the Nabataeans. Carving a city out of the sandstone... Read More

Rhodes Archaeological Museum

The Rhodes Archaeological Museum is housed within the Great Hospital of the Knights Hospitallers an important Crusader site.

The Rhodes Archaeological Museum displays mostly Classical and Hellenistic as well as some Archaic artifacts including statues, funereal pieces and decorative items. The building in which the Rhodes Archaeological Museum is located is also historically important, it being the Great Hospital of the Knights Hospitallers, built between 1440 and 1489. This... Read More

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Simena

The ruins of Simena are spread along beautiful beaches and submerged under crystal clear waters. Enjoy spectacular views from the crusader castle or explore an authentic Lycian Necropolis.

The remains of ancient Simena, now modern Kaleköy in the Kekova region, form one of the most impressive historical places in Turkey. The city’s striking crusader castle combines with a wealth of partly submerged ancient ruins and the beautiful Mediterranean waters to produce a truly inspiring place to explore. Indeed, it... Read More

St George’s Castle

St George’s Castle in Lisbon is a medieval castle which once served as a royal palace. One of many Crusader sites in Portugal.

St George’s Castle (Castelo de Sao Jorge) in Lisbon is a medieval citadel resting high atop one of the city’s highest hills overlooking the Tagus River. Historical research has shown that the hill on which St George’s Castle sits was inhabited as early as the sixth century BC, with the first... Read More

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Temple Church

The Temple Church in London was established by the Knights Templar in the twelfth century.

The Temple Church in Central London is named after the Knights Templar, who founded it in the twelfth century. Consecrated on 10 February 1185, probably in the presence of King Henry II, Temple Church became the British headquarters of this famous Christian charitable and military order who played an important... Read More

The Coenaculum - Jerusalem

The Coenaculum in Jerusalem is a Crusader-built structure at the believed location of The Last Supper.

The Coenaculum in Jerusalem is a room built by the Crusaders in the fourteenth century, later taken over by the Franciscans and then transformed into a mosque by the Ottomans in the sixteenth century. However, for Christians, it is best known as the “Last Supper Room”, the upper room where Jesus... Read More

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Vezelay Basilica

Vezelay Basilica is a twelfth century Romanesque church once said to have housed Mary Magdalene’s relics. It was the meeting place for Richard the Lionheart and Philip Augustus in July 1190, just before they embarked on the Third Crusade.

Vezelay Basilica, also known as Vezelay Abbey or Basilique Ste-Madeleine, has been a place of pilgrimage since it was claimed that the relics of Mary Magdalene had been brought there, sometime before the twelfth century. Whilst it is unlikely that this was really the case, Vezelay Basilica has remained an... Read More