Civil Rights Sites

If you’re looking to explore Civil Rights sites and want to find the best places to view the history of the Civil Rights movement then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s an initial selection of Civil Rights sites below and you can find interesting places to see on your trips. Once you’ve explored the list of Civil Rights sites and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring Civil Rights sites.

Our database of Civil Rights historic places is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other Civil Rights Movement (US) sites, remains or ruins, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

Civil Rights Movement (US): Site Index

Photo by M Glasgow (cc)

Bethel Baptist Church

One of the most important Civil Rights sites, Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham Alabama was the headquarters of local civil rights activists and played a crucial role in the US Civil Rights movement.

DID YOU KNOW?

The site of Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham Alabama played a crucial role in the fledgling American Civil Rights movement.

From 1956 until 1961 Bethel Baptist Church was the headquarters of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights which strove to ensure equal rights through non-violent means and fought against policies of segregation.

As well as serving as the headquarters for this group, the Bethel Baptist Church was a key site during the 1961 Freedom Ride. The church building was also attacked three times by extremists, in 1956, 1958 and 1962.

Today the Bethel Baptist Church holds a small museum to the Civil Rights movement.

Photo by Zol87 (cc)

DuSable Museum of African American History

The DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago looks at the history of Africans and Americans of African descent.

DID YOU KNOW?

The DuSable Museum of African American History is a museum in Chicago which explores the history and culture of African Americans. Its exhibits include several murals, paintings and sculptures representing prominent African Americans and an exhibit looking at the history of African Americans in the armed forces. The DuSable Museum also offers an insight into the civil rights movement from 1848 to 1968.

Photo by Su-Laine (cc)

Martin Luther King Jr National Site

The Martin Luther King Jr National Site explores the life of the leader of the African-American civil rights movement.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Martin Luther King Jr National Site in Atlanta, Georgia is dedicated to commemorating the life of the leader of the African-American civil rights movement and chronicling his campaign for racial equality.

Born on 15 January 1929, Martin Luther King Jr was a Baptist minister who came to lead a non-violent movement for equality amongst races in the United States. He is most widely remembered for the March on Washington, a demonstration in August 1963 which culminated in his “I have a dream” speech.

In 1964, Martin Luther King Jr won a Nobel Prize for his work in battling racial segregation. He was the youngest ever person to receive this award.

Visitors to the Martin Luther King Jr Historic Site can visit Dr and Mr’s King’s crypt at the King Centre, view his birthplace and see exhibitions and films about Dr King’s life and the civil rights movement. There are also exhibits about Gandhi, who inspired Dr King and about Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her seat on a bus was an iconic event of the movement.

Most of the tour is self guided, except for those who visit Dr King’s birthplace, which is led by a ranger (only fifteen people admitted per tour). This site also features as one of our Top 10 Tourist Attractions of the United States.

Photo by Adam Jones PhD (cc)

National Civil Rights Museum

The site where the father of the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King Jr, was gunned down. It is one of the most important Civil Rights sites.

DID YOU KNOW?

The National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel is the sight of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

It has in the last several years been turned into the National Civil Right Museum. Across the street from the motel is the building and room in which James Earl Ray fired the shots and this also forms part of the museum.

As well as examining the events that led to the assassination and the investigation that followed, the National Civil Rights Museum hosts a number of exhibitions chronicling key episodes of the US civil rights movement and its legacy.

The King Centre

The King Centre in Atlanta is the final resting place of Dr Martin Luther King Jr, the father of the Civil Rights Movement.

DID YOU KNOW?

The King Centre in Atlanta, Georgia commemorates Martin Luther King Jr, a Baptist minister and the leader of the African-American civil rights movement.

Dr King was assassinated on 4 April 1968 at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee and his joint crypt with his wife is located at the King Centre.

Visitors to the King Centre, which is part of the Martin Luther King Jr National Historic Site managed by the National Parks Service, can embark on a self guided tour to see his final resting place as well as viewing exhibits about Dr King.