Carthaginian Ruins and Carthaginian Sites

If you’re looking to explore Carthaginian ruins and Carthaginian sites and want to find the best places to view the history of the Carthaginian Empire then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

There’s a great selection of Carthaginian ruins and Carthaginian sites and you can plan some fantastic things to see on your travels. Once you’ve explored the list of Carthaginian sites and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring Carthaginian ruins and Carthaginian sites.

If you're planning on visiting the ancient city of Carthage itself, you may wish to explore our Carthage Sites Map.

Our database of Carthaginian historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other Carthaginian sites, remains or ruins, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

Carthage: Site Index

Photo by upyernoz (cc)

Byrsa Hill

Part of the Archaeological site of Carthage, Byrsa Hill contains a number of remains from the original Punic city of Carthage as well as the Carthage National Museum and St Louis Cathedral.

Byrsa Hill forms part of the Archaeological site of Carthage and contains a number of interesting historical places to explore. Once the ancient citadel of this powerful city, Byrsa Hill was the military centre of ancient Carthage and was besieged and destroyed by the Romans in 146BC. However,... Read More

Photo by Jörg Schulz (cc)

Cannae Battlefield

Cannae Battlefield is the location of Hannibal’s greatest victory in 216 BC over a huge Roman army led Consuls Varro and Paullus.

Cannae Battlefield marks the site of the famous Battle of Cannae, fought in 216 BC between Hannibal of Carthage and a huge Roman army led by Consuls Varro and Paullus. It stands as Hannibal’s greatest victory and Rome’s greatest defeat. However, not even this massive loss of life stopped the... Read More

Photo by aymen hs (cc)

Carthage

The most famous of all Carthaginian ruins and Carthaginian sites, Carthage was once one of the most powerful cities of the ancient world. Today, its ruins can be found on the outskirts of modern Tunis.

Carthage was one of the most powerful cities of the ancient world and spawned the powerful Carthaginian Empire which dominated much of the western Mediterranean. The ruins of this famed city can be found on the outskirts of modern day Tunis. Carthage itself was central to the history of the ancient... Read More

Photo by nonanet (cc)

Carthage National Museum

Carthage National Museum contains a wide selection of artefacts and exhibitions from the Punic, Roman and Byzantine periods of Carthage. It is a good place to begin you exploration of the ruins of this ancient city.

Carthage National Museum - sometimes simply called Carthage Museum - is one of the most important museums in Tunis and contains a range of interesting exhibitions and artefacts from the Carthaginian and Roman periods. Amongst the many exhibits are displays examining life in ancient Carthage, the conflicts with the... Read More

Photo by Neil Rickards (cc)

Carthage Punic Port and Museum

The Carthage Punic Port and Museum hold the remains of the ancient military naval base of the Punic city of Carthage.

The Carthage Punic Port and Punic Port Museum can be found in the area of the ancient Carthaginian harbour near modern day Tunis. This ancient superpower built its reputation on its mastery of the seas and the ancient Port of Carthage would have once help over two hundred of... Read More

Photo by Sapphira (cc)

Djemila

Djemila in Algeria is the site of extensive Roman ruins of a former military base.

Djemila in Algeria is an archaeological site housing the ruins of a UNESCO-inscribed Ancient Roman settlement. Founded under the name Cuicil, it is thought that Djemila was first established between 96 and 98 AD under the Emperor Nerva and occupied until the fifth or sixth century. Constructed amidst mountainous terrain, Djemila... Read More

Photo by NH53 (cc)

Leptis Magna

Leptis Magna was once one of the most important African cities of the Roman Empire and is now an impressive Carthaginian archaeological site in Tripoli.

Leptis Magna (Lepcis Magna) is an incredibly well preserved archaeological site in Tripoli, Libya. Originally founded by the Phoenicians as the port of Lpgy in the first millennium BC, Leptis Magna later became part of the Carthaginian Empire and was then incorporated into the Roman Empire in 46 BC. Most of... Read More

Nora Archaeological Site

One of many Carthaginian ruins in Sardinia, the Nora Archaeological Site houses ancient Phoenician, Carthaginian, and Roman ruins.

The Nora Archaeological Site in Sardinia contains mostly Ancient Roman ruins, but was founded in at least the 8th century BC by the Phoenicians. Some Phoenician ruins can be seen, including a temple and some fortifications. Prior to Phoenician settlement, Nora may have even previously been a nuraghi site (the people... Read More

Photo by archer10 (Dennis) (cc)

Sanctuary of Tophet

The Sanctuary of Tophet is an ancient Cartheginian burial site containing a vast number of children’s graves.

The Sanctuary of Tophet holds the remains of a vast number of children’s graves dating back to the Punic period of Carthage. Many historians have speculated that the Carthaginians practised child-sacrifice during times of serious hardship, though this point is hotly disputed. Today this eerie site can be found... Read More

Su Nuraxi di Barumini

Su Nuraxi di Barumini is a pretty UNESCO-listed prehistoric site in Sardinia and one of the island’s many nuraghe. It also contains some Carthaginian ruins.

Su Nuraxi di Barumini is a prime example of one of Sardinia’s many nuraghe structures. Little is known about the nuraghe, except that they are thought to have been built from the Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age (circa 1500-800BC) by the island’s inhabitants as a form of defence,... Read More

Tharros

Tharros, in Sardinia, was founded by the Phoenicians and contains mostly Roman and Carthaginian ruins.

Tharros is an archaeological site in Sardinia brimming with centuries of history. Founded in the eighth century BC by the Phoenicians, Tharros would be inhabited by the Carthaginians and the Romans, leaving behind a series of ancient structures, especially its two standing Corinthian columns. Among the other highlights of the... Read More

The Bardo Museum

The Bardo Museum is an archaeological museum in Tunisia most renowned for its Roman mosaic collection and Carthaginian exhibitions.

The Bardo Museum (Le Musee National du Bardo) in Tunis is Tunisia’s national archaeological museum and contains artefacts from throughout the country’s history. From prehistoric items to Punic ceremonial artefacts believed to be connected with practices of human sacrifice and right through to art from the Islamic era, the Bardo Museum... Read More

Photo by Erik Pitti (cc)

The Magon Quarter

The Magon Quarter in Carthage holds the remains of a small Punic residential site and section of the ancient defensive wall.

The Magon Quarter contains the remains of a small Punic residential area dating back to the Carthaginian city of Carthage. The Magon Quarter is relatively small and there aren’t many remains to see, though the site does contain a section of the ancient city wall, dating back to the fifth... Read More

Photo by niai (cc)

Trasimene Battlefield

Trasimene Battlefield is the location of major defeat of the Roman army by Hannibal during the Second Punic War.

Trasimene Battlefield marks the site of the Battle of Trasimene, fought in 217 BC between Hannibal of Carthage and the Consul Flaminius of Rome. It was one of the major battles of the Second Punic War and a crushing defeat for Rome. During the encounter, Hannibal - a gifted strategist -... Read More

Photo by Dani4P (cc)

Trebbia Battlefield

Location of the first major battle of the Second Punic War between Hannibal and the Roman consuls Scipio and Longus.

Trebbia Battlefield marks the location of the Battle of Trebbia, the first significant clash of the Second Punic War. Fought in 218 BC, it was a resounding defeat for the Roman armies under the consuls Scipio and Longus and a major victory for the great Carthaginian general Hannibal. A resounding defeat... Read More