BBC Meet the Romans with Mary Beard

In a new BBC series Professor Mary Beard is taking us on a tour of the side of ancient Rome that you may not be familiar with – looking at the day-to-day lives of the everyday people rather than the high grandeur and drama of the Imperial family.

In Meet the Romans with Mary Beard, the BBC show visits a number of fascinating ancient Roman sites which give an idea of what life was really like for the vast majority of the population in the Eternal City.

Meet the Romans with Mary Beard also looks at famous sites from another angle – such as the Roman Forum – while seeking those places that reflect the vibrancy of everyday life in the city.

You can find out more about Meet the Romans with Mary Beard here.

BBC Meet the Romans with Mary Beard: Site Index

Photo by Sebastian Bergmann (cc)

Arch of Titus

The Arch of Titus is a Roman triumphal arch built by the Emperor Domitian to commemorate the victories of his elder brother, Emperor Titus.

The Arch of Titus is a Roman triumphal arch built by the Emperor Domitian to commemorate the victories of his elder brother, Emperor Titus. The Arch was completed shortly after Titus’ death in 81AD. Though only Emperor for two years, Titus had fought many campaigns under his father, Emperor Vespasian. The... Read More

Photo by S J Pinkney (cc)

Herculaneum

Herculaneum was an ancient Roman town fossilized following the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD.

Herculaneum was a port town established by the ancient Romans in what is now modern Ercolano, Italy. At its peak, Herculaneum would have had around 4,000 citizens and served as a holiday town for wealthy Campanians and Romans. Like nearby Pompeii, Herculaneum was engulfed by the lava and mud which spewed... Read More

Photo by dalbera (cc)

Ostia Antica

The site of Ostia Antica contains the ruins of the port of ancient Rome and visitors can view some amazingly well preserved remains of the settlement.

Ostia Antica is an extraordinary Roman site that contains the ruins of the ancient port town that served as the gateway to Rome. Just half an hour from central Rome by train, Ostia Antica has all the inspiration of Pompeii without the throngs of tourists. In fact, if you want to... Read More

Photo by Vvillamon (cc)

Roman Forum

The Roman Forum was the very centre of ancient Rome. However, in Meet the Romans with Mary Beard, they take a quite different view of this famous Roman landmark, and looks at the Forum as a place of gamblers, dentists and thieves.

The Roman Forum, or Forum Romanum, was the very centre of ancient Rome. Throughout the lifespan of Roman civilisation the Forum served as the focus of political, civic and religious life. From magnificent temples and triumphal arches to the very seat of power in the Senate house, the Roman Forum was... Read More

Photo by albertopveiga (cc)

The Colosseum

Once the largest amphitheatre of Ancient Rome where gladiators, criminals and lions alike fought for their lives, the Colosseum remains a world renowned, iconic symbol of the Roman Empire.

The Colosseum is a site like no other. Beyond a shadow of a doubt, nothing represents the sheer power and magnificence of the Roman Empire like this stunning piece of ancient architecture. The Colosseum, or ‘Colosseo’ in Italian, was once the largest amphitheatre in the Roman Empire. It was built in... Read More

Tomb of Eurysaces the Baker

Featured in the first episode of Meet the Romans with Mary Beard, the Tomb of Eurysaces the Baker is an impressive ancient tomb dating back to 30BC.

The Tomb of Eurysaces the Baker is an impressive and peculiar ancient tomb in Rome dating back to around 30BC. The tomb was built by a former slave turned wealthy freeman named Marcus Vergilius Eurysaces – who made his fortune as a grand baker and contractor. Unique in shape and design, it... Read More

Photo by Oggie Dog (cc)

Via Appia Antica

Via Appia Antica, built in 312 BC, is one of the most important roads leading to Rome.

Via Appia Antica, also known as the Appian Way, is one of the oldest and most important roads leading to Rome. Built in 312 BC, it was slowly extended and, by 191 BC, it reached the port of Brindisi, over 550km southeast of the city (along the “heel” of Italy).... Read More