Babylonian Ruins and Babylonian Sites

If you’re looking to explore Babylonian ruins and Babylonian sites and want to find the best places to view Babylonian Empire history then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

Our selection of  Babylonian Empire sites is continuing to expand and you can plan some fantastic things to see on your trips. Once you’ve explored the list of  Babylonian ruins and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring Babylonian ruins .

Our database of Babylonian historic places is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other Babylonian sites, remains or ruins, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our upload page.

If you’re interested in Babylonian ruins and Babylonian sites then you may also wish to explore our Mesopotamian Cities page.

Babylonian Empire: Site Index

Photo by gustaf wallen (cc)

Babylon

The best-known of the Babylonian ruins, Babylon is one of the most famous cities of the ancient world and today can be found near the town of Al-Hillah in modern-day Iraq.

DID YOU KNOW?

The ancient metropolis of Babylon is one of the most famous cities of the ancient world and today can be found near the town of Al-Hillah in modern-day Iraq.

Founded almost five thousand years ago, the city on the Euphrates has seen empires rise and fall and has been the centre of the highest forms of culture and the most brutal wars and devastation.

It is likely that Babylon was founded in the third millennium BC and rose to prominence over the next thousand years. By the 18th century BC the city was the centre of the empire of Hammurabi. However, the changing political and military nature of the region saw Babylon fought over countless times over the following centuries, with one empire or dynasty after another securing Babylon as their home.

A resurgence of an independent Babylonian empire briefly flourished towards the end of the 7th century BC under king Nebuchadnezzar II – famous for building great wonders within the city, including the renowned Hanging Gardens of Babylon – yet even this dynasty failed to last, with Babylon falling to Cyrus the Great, king of the Persian Empire.

In 331 BC Alexander the Great captured Babylon, and it was here he died in 323 BC. After the fall of Alexander’s fledgling empire, Babylon was fought over by his surviving generals and was slowly abandoned over the following centuries.

The ruins of Babylon have suffered greatly due to looting and destructive policies, leaving little behind that captures the glory of the once-great city. Saddam Hussein also built a ‘new’ version of ancient Babylon over the site.

Of Babylon’s ancient ruins, it is still possible to see parts of Nebuchadnezzar's palace and some of the old city walls. It is also possible to see a reconstruction of the Ishtar Gate in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin.

Although the site of Babylon is open to visitors, it is advisable to check with you government’s official travel advice policy before undertaking any trips to Babylon.

Photo by SpirosK photography (cc)

The Pergamon Museum

The Pergamon Museum in Berlin displays ancient exhibitions and those of Muslim art. It also contains and extensive collection of Babylonian artefacts.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Pergamon Museum is a large and varied museum in Berlin housing three different exhibitions.

One of the collections at the Pergamon Museum is part of the Classical Antiquities, known as the Antikensammlung. This collection includes mostly Greek and some Roman pieces ranging from jewellery to sarcophagi, sculptures and even remains from buildings. However, it is the reconstruction of the second century BC Pergamon Altar, one of the sites from the ancient city of Pergamon and with its Hellenistic fresco depicting the battle of the Giants and the Gods, which forms one of its most famous attractions.

The largest collection at the Pergamon Museum is that of its Museum of the Ancient near East or ‘Vorderasiatisches Museum’, which covers over 2,000 square feet and around six thousand years of history. From reconstructions of Babylonian monuments such as the Ishtar Gate, the facade of the throne hall of King Nebuchadnezzar II and the Tower of Babel to ninth millennium BC reliefs from the Assyrian palace of Kalchu, this is a fascinating exhibit.

The Pergamon Museum also contains a Museum of Islamic Art or ‘Museum für Islamische Kunst’ in its southern wing where it displays everything from Islamic jewellery to architectural decorations.

Please note that recent reconstruction projects have meant that some of the exhibits of the National Museum have been moved to the Neues Museum.