Aula Ottagona

USER RATING: 1 votes

Aula Ottagona HISTORY

The Aula Ottagona, or Octagonal Hall, is probably the best surviving structure from the Baths of Diocletian. Built in 306AD, the baths were the largest of the ancient world and could hold up to 3,000 people at a time.

Today, the remains of the baths can be seen over a wide area, with parts of the structure having been incorporated into other buildings, such as the Basilica Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri.

However, to get the best idea of the scale and make-up of the original structure, the Aula Ottogona is the place to visit. A domed structure that would have been one of several large chambers making up the original bath complex, the Aula Ottogona remains intact and is now used for exhibitions as part of the National Roman Museum.

Aula Ottagona TOURIST INFORMATION

DIRECTIONS TO Aula Ottagona

The nearest metro station is Republicca (line A).

LOCAL AMENITIES

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Aula Ottagona OPENING TIMES AND TICKET PRICES

The Aula Ottagona is currently closed except for exhibitions – check with the National Roman Museum for more information.

Aula Ottagona HISTORIC INFORMATION

NAME: Aula Ottagona
CONTINENT: EUROPE
Alt Name: Octagonal Hall
Country: Italy
Period: Ancient Rome
Sub-Region: Southern Europe
Date: 400AD - 499AD
City/Town: Rome
Figure: Diocletian
Resorts: Rome,

CONTACT DETAILS

Aula Ottagona ADDRESS

Aula Ottagona, National Roman Museum, 8 Via Giuseppe Romita, Rome.

Aula Ottagona PHONE NUMBER

+39 06 3996 7700

Aula Ottagona EMAIL

info@060608.it

RULED BY
Emperor :
Claudius Drusus
King :
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Prince :
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Duke :
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Lord :
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Just as empires rise and fall so do entry fees and opening hours! While we work as hard as we can to ensure the information provided here about Aula Ottagona is as accurate as possible, the changing nature of certain elements mean we can't absolutely guarantee that these details won't become a thing of the past. If you know of any information on this page that needs updating you can add a comment above or e-mail us.

User Comments

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Claudius Drusus 17 May, 2012

Hidden and not able to go inside, but worth a look if you're walking past.