Ancient Greek Sites and Ancient Greek Ruins

Ancient-Greek-RuinsIf you’re looking to explore Ancient Greek sites and Ancient Greek ruins and want to find the best places to view Ancient Greek history then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

Ancient Greece was the cradle of democracy. A civilisation which produced some of the most groundbreaking art, philosophy and culture the world has ever seen, the Ancient Greeks left their legacy in a myriad of ways.

Many Ancient Greek sites and ruins that have survived today are among the most famous landmarks in the world. The Acropolis in Athens stands tall as a testament to Ancient Greek achievement. Yet there is a multitude of Ancient Greek sites and Ancient Greek places that are still able to be seen today, some equally as famous, others ignored by the masses.

There’s a great selection of Ancient Greek sites and Ancient Greek ruins and you can plan some fantastic things to see on your trips. Once you’ve explored the list of the sites of Ancient Greece you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring Ancient Greek ruins.

Our database of historic places is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. If you know of other Ancient Greek sites, remains or ruins, you can add them to Trip Historic by visiting our upload page. Click the links below to explore Ancient Greek sites and ruins:

Ancient Greece: Editor's Picks

Photo by Historvius

1. The Acropolis

The Acropolis is one of the most recognisable historic sites in the world and remains an inspirational monument to the achievements of Ancient Greek civilisation.

The Acropolis is one of the most recognisable historic sites in the world and remains an inspirational monument to the achievements of Ancient Greek civilisation. Standing tall above the Greek city of Athens, the Acropolis contains a number of buildings and monuments from Greek Antiquity, including the Parthenon,... Read More

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2. Paestum

Among the best Greek ruins anywhere in the world, Paestum is a Greco-Roman site in Italy containing the stunning remains of three ancient Greek temples.

Paestum is a Greco-Roman site located south of Naples which contains the stunning remains of three ancient Greek temples which still stand tall today. Founded as a Greek colony in the 6th century BC, Paestum was originally known as Poseidonia, named for the Greek god Poseidon. The city was captured by... Read More

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3. Olympia

Olympia was a city in Ancient Greece from which today’s Olympic Games originate and is now an important archaeological site protected by UNESCO.

Olympia was a vibrant Ancient Greek city. It is believed that the site of Olympia was inhabited from 3000 BC, however it was after the fall of the Mycenaean civilisation that the city began to flourish and, by 900 BC it was already considered an important religious site. The Olympic Games In... Read More

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4. Epidaurus

Epidaurus was a city of Ancient Greece located on the Greek mainland. Its incredible ruins are a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Epidaurus was a major city in Ancient Greece famed as a centre for healing. Inhabited since prehistoric times, Epidaurus thrived as a sanctuary devoted to the healing deities including Apollo, Asklepios and Hygeia and contained hundreds of spas, the remains of many of which can be seen today. The main sanctuary area,... Read More

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5. Valley of the Temples

The Valley of the Temples is a UNESCO-listed site in Sicily housing the very well-preserved remains of several Ancient Greek temples which rank among the best ancient Greek remains in the world

The Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi) is a famous archaeological site in Sicily housing some of the best preserved Ancient Greek ruins in the world, especially outside Greece. Agrigento, in which they are located, had been a Greek colony since the 6th century BC. Really more of a ridge... Read More

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6. Troy

Troy is a world-renowned archaeological site, and one of the best-known ancient Greek ruins. Inhabited since the 4th millennium BC, it is believed to the have been the location of the famous Trojan War.

Troy or “Truva” is one of the most famous and historically significant sites in the world. Located in modern day Turkey, the site marks the meeting place of Anatolia, the Aegean and the Balkans, making it a vitally important source of information about the historic relationships between these regions. Imbued with... Read More

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7. Delphi

Among the best known of all Ancient Greek sites, Delphi is an Ancient Greek city once considered to have been the centre of the Earth.

Delphi is an archaeological site in mainland Greece comprised of the well-preserved ruins of one of the most important cities in Ancient Greece. Archaeologists have found evidence that Delphi was inhabited as early as the Neolithic period and sites dating back to the Mycenaean Civilisation, but it was the Ancient... Read More

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8. Sparta

The ancient Greek city of Sparta was one of the most famous city-states of the ancient world.

Sparta was one of the most famous city-states of the ancient world and left not only a mark in our historic records, but its very culture at the heart of modern language – the English word 'Spartan' reflecting their very way of life – simple, basic, severe. Rising to power in... Read More

Ancient Greece: Site Index

Abila

Abila is an ancient town in Jordan and one of the Decapolis, a federation of 10 Greco-Roman cities providing a defence of the eastern front of the Roman Empire.

Along with Philadelphia, Gerasa, Pella, Gadara, Kanatha, Dion, Scythopolis and Damascus, Abila made up part of the Decapolis, a ten-city Greco-Roman federation southeast of the Sea of Galilee in Jordan providing a strategic defence post protecting the eastern front of the Roman Empire. It was occupied in the Bronze Age... Read More

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Acropolis of Rhodes

The Acropolis of Rhodes is the site of the main remains of what was the city of Rhodes in the Hellenistic period.

The Acropolis of Rhodes is the site of the main remains of what was the city of Rhodes in the Hellenistic period. Containing several different sites, including temples, monuments and public buildings, the Acropolis of Rhodes represents the main ancient site in the city, dating to mostly the third and second... Read More

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Aigai

Aigai in northern Greece, was once capital of the Macedonian kingdom and the site where Alexander the Great was proclaimed king. A number of remains of the ancient town can be seen, including the tomb of Alexander’s father.

Aigai in northern Greece was once the capital of the Macedonian kingdom and it was here in 336BC that Alexander the Great was proclaimed King of Macedon after the assassination of his father, Philip II. Though evidence of human occupation of the site stretches back to the 3rd millennium BC, it... Read More

Alexandria National Museum

The Alexandria National Museum in Alexandria, Egypt houses one of the world's finest collections of Pharaonic, Ptolemaic, Coptic, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic artefacts in the world.

Opened in 2003 by Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, the Alexandria National Museum sits in the middle of the city in an elegant early 20th century Italianate mansion that used to be the home to the Consulate of the United States of America. The 3,480 square metre museum documents the rich... Read More

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Amathus

Amathus is an archaeological Ancient Greek site in Cyprus containing the remains of one of the island’s oldest ancient towns.

Amathus is an archaeological site in Cyprus containing the remains of one of the island’s oldest ancient towns. Known to have been inhabited since at least 1050BC, the origins of Amathus are unclear. It is believed to have been founded by the Eteocyprians and to have flourished and grown. Over time,... Read More

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Ancient Agora of Athens

One of many Ancient Greek sites in Athens, the Ancient Agora was a market, a meeting place and the social, political and commercial hub of the ancient city.

The Ancient Agora of Athens was a market, a meeting place and the social, political and commercial hub of the ancient city. Whilst initial developed in the sixth century BC, the Ancient Agora of Athens was destroyed, rebuilt and renovated several times, including attacks by the Persians in 480BC, the... Read More

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Antalya Museum

The Antalya Museum contains thousands of ancient and prehistoric artifacts, many from the ancient Greek period.

The Antalya Museum (Antalya Muzesi) is an archaeological museum in one of Turkey’s most popular resorts. It contains thousands of ancient and prehistoric artifacts and good explanations of their history. It is one of Turkey’s largest museums. The pieces at the Antalya Museum come from a variety of sites around Turkey... Read More

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Apamea

Apamea is an ancient site in Syria which boasts a remarkable 1800 metres of dramatic Roman colonnades as well as Ancient Greek ruins.

Apamea (Afamia) is an ancient site in Syria which boasts a remarkable 1800 metres of dramatic Roman colonnades together with a range of other ruins. Said to have been one of the largest Seleucid cities and built in around the 4th century BC in what is now Syria, Apamea... Read More

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Aphrodisias

The ancient city of Aphrodisias was named after the Goddess of Love; Aphrodite. Established in what is now modern day Turkey in the 6th century BC, it expanded into the thriving capital of the surrounding region.

Aphrodisias was once a thriving Hellenic and Roman city in what is now modern day Turkey. Today it is an archaeological site, whose ruins include the remains of a beautiful ancient stadium. Established during the late Hellenistic period, Aphrodisias became a prosperous city under Roman rule from the 1st to the... Read More

Apollonia

Apollonia is an ancient site in Albania which Cicero deemed a 'great and important city'.

Apollonia is an ancient site in Albania which was home to a succession of civilisations, but which reached its zenith in the 3rd or 4th century BC. Whilst the site of Apollonia was once inhabited by Illyrian tribes, it was in approximately 588 BC that Greek colonists from Corfu and... Read More

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Aptera

large site on northern coats of Crete. Key strategic location results in occupation from early Greek through Roman, early Christian to Ottoman with WW2 machine gun posts. Impossible to provide one picture to show whole site. Would like to split according to place and time.

The archaeological site of Aptera contains an array of interesting Greco-Roman ruins, the highlight of which is probably the remains of the Roman cisterns which originally supplied water to the city’s baths. Founded around the 7th century BC, Aptera became one of the most important cities of western Crete and grew... Read More

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Arsuf

The site of Arsuf, also known as Apollonia, contains the remains of a Crusader castle once occupied by the Knights Hospitaller as well as remains from other periods including Ancient Greece.

Arsuf, also known as Apollonia, contains the remains of an ancient settlement on the Israeli coast that has stood for over 1,000 years. Arsuf is best known for the remains of a once-mighty Crusader castle which was once home to the Knights Hospitaller, but the site also contains remnants from... Read More

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Asklepieion

Asklepieion is an ancient Greek archaeological site containing the well-preserved ruins of the birthplace of medicine.

Asklepieion, also known as Asclepeion, in Kos was an ancient Greek and Roman sacred centre of healing based on the teachings of Hippocrates. It seems that there has been a healing sanctuary at the site of Asklepieion since prehistory, but the main ruins today are those of later sanctuaries. The most... Read More

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Assos

The city of Assos was founded by Ancient Greeks from the 7th century BC. The ancient ruined city is crowned by an impressive temple dedicated to the Goddess Athena.

The city of Assos on the Aegean coast of modern Turkey was founded by Ancient Greeks sometime around the 7th century BC. Today the site, whose modern name is Behramkale, is a beautiful seaside resort littered with ancient ruins dating from the ancient Greek and Roman periods. The city passed through... Read More

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Athens National Archaeological Museum

Athens National Archaeological Museum is one of the most prominent of its kind in the world and has over 20,000 pieces.

Athens National Archaeological Museum is the largest museum in Greece, housing over 20,000 exhibits spread over 8,000 square metres of an imposing nineteenth century building. With permanent exhibitions ranging from the Neolithic era and the Mycenaean era to the Ancient Romans and even the Ancient Egyptians, the Athens National Archaeological Museum’s... Read More

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Baalbek

Baalbek is home to the largest ever Roman temple and a range of other magnificent ancient structures, including many from the ancient greek period.

Baalbek is a hugely impressive Roman site in Lebanon which is home to the largest Roman temple ever built, as well as a range of other magnificent ancient structures. Initially a Phoenician settlement dedicated to the worship of the deity of the sun, Baal, the city was known as Heliopolis (City... Read More

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Bassae

Bassae is an ancient site and home to a famed UNESCO-listed monument to Apollo Epicurius.

Bassae is an ancient site where the Phigaleia built a sanctuary to the cult of Apollo Epicurius. A 5th Century BC magnificent temple in honour of the deity still stand there today. At one time, the Messenians people fled to Bassae, seeking sanctuary there from their war with the Spartans.... Read More

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Benaki Museum

The Benaki Museum houses a vast collection of art and artefacts from Greek history, from Hellenic, Roman and Byzantine Greece to the Ottoman age and right up to the present day.

The Benaki Museum in Athens houses over 100,000 artefacts from Greek history and showcases the many eras, civilisations and cultures which have influenced the development of Greece. Spread over a number of locations, the museum ranks among Greece’s foremost cultural institutions. The main museum is located in the centre of Athens... Read More

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British Museum

The British Museum in London is a world-famous museum of history and culture and has an excellent collection of ancient greek artefacts.

The British Museum is one of the world’s foremost museums of history and anthropology. Based in London, the British Museum has some of the largest and most revered collections from around the globe ranging from Babylonian stonework and Samurai armour to pottery and glass from the Roman Empire. The British Museum... Read More

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Butrint

Butrint is a prehistoric UNESCO World Heritage site in south west Albania which has been occupied by the Greeks, Romans and Byzantines.

Butrint is an archaeological national park in Albania and a UNESCO World Heritage site, renowned for its ancient ruins dating back as far as the 7th century BC. In fact, classic mythology says that exiles moved to Butrint to escape following the fall of Troy. Originally part of an area called... Read More

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Cairo Museum of Egyptian Antiquities

The Cairo Museum of Egyptian Antiquities contains the most comprehensive and important collection of Ancient Egyptian artefacts in the world as well as some from the Ancient Greek period.

The Cairo Museum of Egyptian Antiquities contains the most comprehensive and important collection of Ancient Egyptian artefacts in the world. Indeed, it is said to have over 100,000 pieces in all. From smaller objects such as coins and piece of papyrus to statues of pharaohs and the magnificence of the Royal... Read More

Capua Archaeological Museum

Capua Archaeological Museum houses a collection of ancient artefacts and is next to an ancient Mithraeum.

Capua Archaeological Museum in Santa Maria Capua Vetere displays a series of artefacts from around the region including from the Bronze Age, Iron Age, the Etruscan civilisation, Ancient Greek and Roman objects. Adjacent to the Capua Archaeological Museum is a second century Mithraeum, a subterranean temple of the Persian cult of... Read More

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Corinth

One of the most famous Ancient Greek sites, Corinth was a major city to both the Ancient Greeks and the Ancient Romans and its fascinating ruins are a popular tourist destination.

Ancient Corinth, the ruins of which can be found in the modern town of Korinthos, was a city of major importance in Ancient Greece and in Ancient Rome. Located in between mainland Greece and the Peloponnese, Corinth was a vital port and a thriving city-state as well as being of... Read More

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Cumae Archaeological Park

Cumae Archaeological Park in Pozzuoli houses a series of ancient ruins and artefacts and is thought to have been inhabited as far back as the Iron Age.

Cumae Archaeological Park in Pozzuoli houses a series of ancient ruins and artefacts and is thought to have been inhabited as far back as the Iron Age. Cumae itself was a settlement established by Greek colonists in the eighth century BC. Sacked by the Oscans in the fifth century BC and... Read More

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Cyrene

Cyrene in Lybia is considered to be one of the most impressive Greco-Roman sites in the world and has many ancient Greek ruins.

Cyrene in Libya is considered to be one of the most impressive Greco-Roman sites in the world and one of the best Classical Greek sites beyond Greece itself. Traditionally said to have been founded by the Greeks of Thera in 631BC, Cyrene was a trading hub first inhabited by the Battiadae... Read More

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Delos

Delos is a UNESCO listed ancient Greek site and the island on which Apollo was said to have been born.

Delos is an island and archaeological site which was held sacred by the ancient Greeks as the birthplace of the deity Apollo. It is unclear as to whether his twin sister Artemis was also believed to have been born there. There were temples built in honour of Artemis at Delos,... Read More

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Delos Archaeological Museum

The Delos Archaeological Museum houses finds from the ancient site of Delos.

The Delos Archaeological Museum contains findings from the UNESCO World Heritage site of Delos. Inhabited since prehistoric times, Delos was an ancient Greek holy site, believed to have been the birthplace of the deity Apollo. Amongst its collection, the Delos Archaeological Museum houses a range of pottery, funerary artefacts and stelae... Read More

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Delphi Archaeological Museum

Delphi Archaeological Museum displays artifacts from the Ancient Greek city of Delphi.

Delphi Archaeological Museum is an historical museum dedicated to exploring the history and exhibiting artifacts from the nearby archeological site of ancient Delphi. Delphi was a major city of Ancient Greece and its sites are themselves popular tourist attractions. Amongst its displays, Delphi Archaeological Museum exhibits statues, sculptures and everyday items... Read More

Didyma

Didyma in Turkey contains the ruins of the temple of Apollo, which was one of the most important oracles of the Hellenic world.

The archaeological site of Didyma in Turkey contains the remains of the ancient Sanctuary of Apollo, one of the most important oracles of the Hellenic world. The oracle, second only to Delphi in importance, was linked to the Greek city of Miletus by the 17km long Sacred Way and the site... Read More

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Dion

Dion is an ancient city in Greece which became the religious centre of the Macedonian kingdom and now contains a number of Greek and Roman-era ruins.

Dion is an ancient city in Greece which contains a number of Greek- and Roman-era ruins. Today it operates as an archaeological site and museum. Very much a place of religious importance, Dion became the religious centre of the Macedonian kingdom in the 5th century BC as well as hosting important... Read More

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Eleusis

An archaeological site of great national importance, the Greco-Roman ruins at Eleusis are beautifully preserved and steeped in the richness of Greek mythology.

Eleusis archaeological site contains a range of impressive Greco-Roman ruins, steeped in the richness of Greek mythology. Surrounded on all sides by a thriving modern industrial town, the site of Eleusis is renowned as the home of the Eleusinian Mysteries, a series of annual initiation ceremonies for the cult of Demeter... Read More

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Empuries

The ruins of a Roman military camp built on the remains of a bustling Greek city, Empuries is the only archaeological site on the Iberian Peninsula that boasts such an ancient history.

The site of Empuries in Catalonia contains the remains of an ancient Greco-Roman city and military camp and is one of the oldest of its kind found on the Iberian Peninsula. The history of Empuries dates back to the early Iron Age, but the remains that can be seen today at... Read More

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Ephesus

Ephesus in Turkey represents some of the best preserved Ancient Greek ruins in the Mediterranean.

Ephesus or "Efes" was a vibrant classical city, now bordering modern day Selçuk in Turkey and representing some of the best preserved Greek and Roman ruins in the Mediterranean.  Thought to have been founded in the 10th century BC by an Athenian prince named Androklos, Ephesus grew into a thriving city... Read More

Florence Archaeological Museum

Florence Archaeological Museum combines an impressive collection of Etruscan art with Ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman artefacts.

Florence Archaeological Museum (Museo archeologico nazionale di Firenze) offers a diverse collection of antiquities. The most impressive and comprehensive collection is probably the archaeological museum’s exhibit of Etruscan art which includes the world famous Chimera of Arezzo statue dating back to 400 BC. Florence Archaeological Museum also exhibits artefacts from Ancient... Read More

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Getty Villa

The Getty Villa is a museum dedicated to the ancient world.

The Getty Villa is a museum of Ancient Greek, Roman and Etruscan artefacts and works of art. Located in Pacific Palisades, California, it displays a collection of antiquities from each of these periods in a thematic exploration of ancient life, culture, religion and even war. The Getty Villa is itself... Read More

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Heraklea Linkestis

Heraklea Linkestis is an archaeological site in Bitola in Macedonia which was once an ancient Roman settlement and contains many Ancient Greek ruins.

Heraklea Linkestis, also known as just Heraklea, is believed to have been founded by King Philip II of Macedon in around the fourth century BC, before being conquered by the Romans in approximately the second century BC. Located along the important trade route of Via Egnatia, Heraklea Linkestis thrived as a... Read More

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Hierapolis

One of many ancient Greek sites in Turkey, Hierapolis was once a thriving, multicultural ancient city and spa, the remains of which can still be seen.

Hierapolis was once a thriving, multicultural ancient city and spa, the remains of which can now be seen in modern day Turkey. It is said to have been founded by the rulers of Pergamum, the Attalid Dynasty, and is usually attributed to their King Eumenes II (197BC-159BC). However, it is... Read More

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Histria

Histria was occupied by the Greeks, Romans and Byzantines and is thought to be the oldest settlement in Romania.

Histria, close to the city of Constanta in Romania is an archaeological park housing ruins which date throughout Romania’s history. Histra was once a harbour, first occupied by the Ancient Greeks in 675 BC. Under the Greeks, it flourished into a centre of trade, specialising in ceramics, glass and metals.... Read More

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Istanbul Archaeology Museum

The Istanbul Archaeology Museum houses around a million artefacts from an impressive range of cultures and periods.

The Istanbul Archaeology Museum (İstanbul Arkeoloji Müzeleri) houses around a million artefacts from an impressive range of cultures and periods, including some of the world’s most remarkable pieces. Split between three buildings - the main archaeology museum, the Ancient Orient Museum and the Tiled Kiosk Museum - the Istanbul Archaeology... Read More

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Jardin des Vestiges

The Jardin des Vestiges is an archaeological site in Marseilles with ancient Greek and Roman remains.

The Jardin des Vestiges is an archaeological site in Marseille housing the remains of this city’s ancient Greek then Roman port. Discovered during building works carried out in the 1960’s, the ruins of Jardin des Vestiges have been excavated and include large sections of walls, gates and the remnants of... Read More

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Kamiros

Kamiros was an ancient city on the island of Rhodes, the ruins of which include an acropolis.

Kamiros (Kameiros) was an ancient city on the island of Rhodes, the ruins of which include an acropolis. Excavations have revealed a long a diverse history at Kamiros including a temple to Athena dating to the 8th century BC. Twice destroyed by earthquakes (in 226BC and 142BC), the main remains... Read More

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Kaunos

Kaunos contains the remains of an ancient Carian city and includes a host of Hellenic, Roman and Byzantine remains – particularly its impressive theatre.

Kaunos archaeological site in Turkey contains the remains of this ancient city which has witnessed the rise and fall of several empires, cultures and civilisations over almost 3,000 years of history. Though not as spectacular as many ancient cities in Turkey, it has the advantage of being quieter, tranquil and... Read More

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Kerameikos

Of of the lesser known Ancient Greek sites in Athens, Kerameikos was the site of an important ancient burial ground.

Kerameikos is an archaeological site in Athens which contains the remains an important ancient burial ground as well as a series of famous monuments. Once home to the city’s potters - hence its name meaning pottery - Kerameikos developed to also become the site of a cemetery. In fact, some of... Read More

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Knidos

The picturesque remains of the ancient city of Knidos are a popular tourist attraction, as much for the beautiful coastal views as for the archaic ruins.

The remains of the ancient Greek city of Knidos, near the modern Turkish town of Datça, are among the most picturesque historic attractions in the region. Perched upon a steep hilltop, looking out over its natural harbour, Knidos boasts stunning views alongside its ancient ruins. Founded by Greek settlers, Knidos was... Read More

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Kos Ancient Agora

The Kos Ancient Agora contains a series of ancient Greek ruins dating from the fourth century BC to the sixth century AD.

The Kos Ancient Agora contains a series of ruins dating from the fourth century BC to the sixth century AD. Amongst them are a temple, probably dedicated to Hercules, a shrine to Aphrodite and the columns of a stoa or covered walkway dating from the third century BC. Over time, the... Read More

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Kourion

Kourion is an impressive archaeological site in Cyprus containing mostly Ancient Roman and Byzantine ruins.

Kourion, also known as Curium, is an impressive archaeological site near Limassol in Cyprus containing mostly Ancient Roman and Byzantine ruins. In fact, it is believed that the site of Kourion was first inhabited during Neolithic times, with the earliest evidence dating back to 4500-3900 BC, but that the town itself... Read More

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Laodikeia

Laodikeia was an Ancient Greek then Roman city, which is now represented by a set of ruins.

Laodikeia, also known as Laodicea, was an Ancient Greek then Roman city, which is now represented by a set of interesting ancient ruins. Said by some to have been founded by Antiochus II Theos of the Seleucid Kingdom in the third century BC, many of the buildings and monuments at the Laodikeia... Read More

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Lato

7 Century BC Doric city on Crete. Well preserved and very well cared for. More atmospheric than over restored Knossos. Just 3 kms from Kritsa

The archaeological site of Lato in eastern Crete contains the ruins of the ancient city which once dominated this area. The city was built atop two high hills which dominated the local area and went on to flourish throughout the Hellenic era. Lato was also the birthplace of Nearchos, the admiral... Read More

Leukaspis

Leukaspis was a thriving Greco-Roman port and city founded in the second century BC. Today, it has been excavated as the Marina el-Alamein Archaeological Site.

Leukaspis (Locassis) was a thriving Greco-Roman port and city founded in the second century BC and which grew to a population of 15,000 residents at its peak. Also known as Antiphrae, Leukaspis was a commercial hub of the Mediterranean olive, wine and wheat industries, conducting trade both inland and overseas.... Read More

Marseille History Museum

The Marseille History Museum chronicles the city’s history since Ancient Greek times.

The Marseille History Museum (Musee d’Histoire de Marseille) chronicles the city’s past since its founding by the Greeks in 600 BC up to the eighteenth century. Adjacent to the archaeological site of Jardin de Vestiges, the Marseille History Museum houses a series of finds, including from ancient Greek and Roman times... Read More

Marseille Roman Docks Museum

The Roman Docks Museum has a collection of artefacts from Marseille’s thriving ancient port.

The Roman Docks Museum (Musée des Docks Romains) in Marseilles is an archaeological museum located on the site of a former Ancient Roman dock warehouse. One of the main exhibits is the set of ceramic jugs or “dolia” which were probably made in the Roman warehouse. Visitors can also see the... Read More

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Metapontum

Remains of Greek city - part of 'magna grecia' or greater Greece. Extensive site with remains of Theatres, temples and drainage. Museum nearby

The remains of the Ancient Greek city of Metapontum - part of ’Magna Grecia’ or greater Greece - include theatres, temples and drainage. Established as a Greek city in the 8th and 7th centuries BC, Metapontum was later home to Pythagoras, who died there around the turn of the 5th... Read More

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Miletus

Miletus was an important ancient Greek then Roman city, which still has an impressive theatre, but relatively few other ruins.

Miletus was an important ancient Greek then Roman city, which still boasts an impressive ancient theatre among its ruins. With a history thought to date back as far as the 16th, perhaps even the 17th, century BC, Miletus eventually became a thriving hub from the 8th to 7th centuries BC until... Read More

Museo del Sannio di Benevento

Museo del Sannio is an historical museum in Benevento which displays ancient and medieval artefacts from the local area.

Museo del Sannio (The Samnite Museum) in Benevento is an archaeological and historical museum housing a series of finds from this area of Campania. Amongst its collections, Museo del Sannio houses Ancient Greek and Ancient Roman pieces as well as those from the Samnite era and includes its Room of Caudium,... Read More

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Mycenae

Mycenae is a well-preserved Ancient Greek archaeological site in the Peloponnese which formed the centre of the Mycenaean civilisation.

Mycenae is an important archaeological site in Greece which was once the city at the centre of the Mycenaean civilisation of between 1600BC and 1100BC. Believed to have been inhabited since Neolithic times, Mycenae flourished into a fortified city and was ruled at one time by the famous King Agamemnon. At... Read More

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Myra

Myra has one of the best-preserved collections of ancient ruins, and is a perfect place to experience an illustrious period of Greek and Roman history being brought back to life.

The ancient town of Myra in Lycia gives a unique insight into Turkey’s history and the many different civilisations which influenced the area. Today a collection of mostly Roman ruins remain which give visitors the opportunity to envisage the bustling centre that is thought to have been established up to 2,500... Read More

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Naples National Archeological Museum

The Naples National Archaeological Museum holds comprehensive collections from the Greek, Roman and Egyptian eras.

The Naples National Archaeological Museum (Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli) holds a comprehensive collection of Ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman artifacts, including most of the pieces found in Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabiae. Some of the most famous exhibits at the Naples National Archaeological Museum include mosaics from the Roman towns and cities... Read More

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek is a world-class museum of art containing a myriad of ancient works in Copenhagen.

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen in Denmark is a museum of art with a world-class collection of over 10,000 works from the ancient world. The Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek was founded in 1888 by the brewer Carl Jacobsen - the man who made Carlsberg beer known worldwide. A new wing... Read More

Olympia Archaeological Museum

Olympia Archaeological Museum is a museum exhibiting artifacts from the ancient city of Olympia.

Olympia Archaeological Museum is a museum focused on the Ancient Greek site of Olympia, which is located nearby. A major Greek city and the place of origin of the Olympic Games, Olympia was dedicated to Zeus and has been extensively excavated. Many of the finds from these excavations are exhibited at... Read More

Palazzo Nuovo

The Palazzo Nuovo is an archaeological museum of Ancient Greek and Roman art. Part of the Musei Capitolini.

The Palazzo Nuovo is part of the Capitoline Museums, known in Italian as Musei Capitolini, which is a famous museum complex in Rome housing an incredible array of artwork and artefacts spanning much of Rome’s history. Originally established in 1471, when Pope Sixtus I donated a series of bronze statues to... Read More

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Panathenaic Stadium

The site of the first modern Olympic games, the 2,300-year-old Panathenaic Stadium in Athens is one of the most significantly important historical sites in all of Greece.

The site of the first modern Olympic games in 1896, the 2,300-year-old Panathenaic Stadium in Athens is one of the most significant historical sites in Greece. Originally built around 330 BC, the ancient stadium was used to host the Panathenaic games every four years. The stadium was rebuilt in the mid-second... Read More

Pasargadae

Pasargadae was the first capital of the Persian Empire, the UNESCO-listed ruins of which are located in Iran.

Pasargadae was the capital of the Persian Empire from the sixth century BC until it was conquered by the Macedonians led by Alexander the Great in 330 BC. Now a town in Iran, Pasargadae was established by the first ruler of the Achaemenid Dynasty, Cyrus the Great. Amongst the sites still... Read More

Pella

Pella in Greece was the capital of ancient Macedonia and the birthplace of Alexander the Great.

Pella, near a small town in Greece by the same name, is an archaeological site which was once the thriving capital of ancient Macedonia. Established by King Amyntas III at the end of the fifth, beginning of the fourth century BC, Pella took over this role from the former capital,... Read More

Pergamum

Pergamum was a thriving ancient Greek then Roman city, home to famous sites such as its Asclepion, theatre and library.

Pergamum, which is also spelt Pergamon, is a famous archaeological site in Turkey which developed under the Attalid dynasty following the death of Alexander the Great. When Alexander died, one of his generals, Lysimachus, took control of the region. When Lysimachus died in 281BC, Pergamum and the surrounding area fell... Read More

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Perge

Perge is a Turkish archaeological site containing mostly Roman ruins, but has a history dating back to Ancient Greece.

The ancient city of Perge near Antalya in Turkey is now an impressive archaeological site containing a wealth of ancient ruins, mostly dating back to the Roman period, though the city itself has a history dating back well into antiquity. The current city is said to have been founded in circa... Read More

Perperikon

Perperikon was an important Thracian sanctuary turned Roman town then medieval fortress.

Perperikon was an important Thracian holy sanctuary which became a Roman town around the first century BC and was later the site of a medieval fortress. Inhabited since 5000BC, Perperikon became home to the Temple of Dionysus, legendary for being the place of great prophecies. One of the most famous... Read More

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Phaselis

Phaselis is an exquisite ancient site, where the ruins lie scattered amongst pine trees and the beautiful Mediterranean coast.

The ruins of Phaselis lie to the west of Antalya on Turkey’s Mediterranean coast, boasting a beautiful contrast of a mountain backdrop and an attractive white sand beach. The site is distinguishable by three natural harbours, and is located in the Olympos National Park. Phaselis is said to have been founded... Read More

Priene

Priene is a quiet, picturesque ancient Greek city in Turkey which boasts some amazing historical remains without the crowds of the nearby sites.

Priene is an ancient Greek city which lies between the popular holiday resorts of Kusadasi and Bodrum. It is one of many important ancient sites in the area and is close to both Miletus and Ephesus. However, though smaller than other nearby historical attractions, the real charm of Priene lies in... Read More

Rhodes Archaeological Museum

The Rhodes Archaeological Museum displays mostly Classical and Hellenistic as well as some Archaic artifacts.

The Rhodes Archaeological Museum displays mostly Classical and Hellenistic as well as some Archaic artifacts including statues, funereal pieces and decorative items. The building in which the Rhodes Archaeological Museum is located is also historically important, it being the Great Hospital of the Knights Hospitallers, built between 1440 and 1489. This... Read More

Sagalassos

Sagalassos is an active archaeological site in southwest Turkey which contains mostly Hellenistic and Ancient Roman ruins, some of them very well preserved.

Sagalassos is an active archaeological site in southwest Turkey which contains mostly Hellenistic and Ancient Roman historic ruins, some of them very well preserved. In particular, the Fountain of Antoninler at Sagalassos still has its pretty facade. There are also the remains of a 9,000 seat theatre, a council hall... Read More

San Lorenzo Maggiore

The San Lorenzo Maggiore ruins in Naples are the underground remains of a Greek colony then Roman city.

What seems to be the attractive thirteenth century church of San Lorenzo Maggiore in Naples in fact contains a startling secret – the amazing underground remains of the Greco-Roman city of Neapolis. For lovers of ancient Rome it's simply unmissable. Established in approximately 470 BC by the Cumans, Neapolis would later... Read More

Segesta

Segesta contains the famous fifth century BC incomplete, but very well-preserved, Temple of Segesta.

Segesta is an archaeological site in north western Sicily most famous for the Temple of Segesta. This fifth century BC temple was started by the Elymian people (circa 426 BC-416BC) but never completed. Nevertheless, with its over thirty intact Doric columns and clear structure, the unfinished Temple of Segesta is so... Read More

Selinunte

Selinunte is an Ancient Greek archaeological site in Sicily containing the ruins of an acropolis and five temples.

Selinunte is an Ancient Greek archaeological site in southern Sicily containing the ruins of an acropolis surrounded by five historic temples, mostly dating to the sixth to fifth centuries BC. The sites at Selinunte are relatively meagre when one considers that this would once have been one of the great cities... Read More

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Side Ruins and Museum

Impressive ruins and a fascinating museum, Side hosts a wealth of Graeco-Roman remains and the impressive amphitheatre is a particular highlight.

The ruins of ancient Side are among of the most spectacular that remain in the modern world and showcase hundreds of years of Greek life in the Roman Empire. Its coastal location made Side a desirable trading port and, despite the prominence of piracy, Greek settlers flocked to the city around... Read More

Stari Grad Plain

The Stari Grad Plain is a prime example of ancient Greek agricultural practices and organisation.

The Stari Grad Plain is a prime example of ancient Greek agricultural practices and organisation dating back to the Greek colony of Pharos. Inhabited by Ionian Greeks in the 4th century BC, the Stari Grad Plain became an important farming landscape, where mainly grapes and olives were grown. Remarkably, the... Read More

Stobi

Stobi in Macedonia was an ancient settlement of Paeonia before becoming a Roman city.

Stobi is one of Macedonia’s most famous archaeological sites. Once the capital of the kingdom of Paeonia, Stobi was located along a busy trade route and thrived as a commercial hub specialising in the trade of salt. Stobi reached its peak in the third or fourth century AD. Whilst the first... Read More

Syntagma Metro Station

Syntagma Metro Station in Athens contains a wonderful display of ancient artefacts which were uncovered during the station’s construction.

In the very heart of the city opposite the Parliament, Syntagma Metro Station is both a transport hub and museum. Dating from the 1990s, when Athens was building its new metro for the 2004 Olympics, the station contains numerous artefacts dating from Classical times - including skeletons - excavated... Read More

Syracuse Archaeological Site

The Syracuse Archaeological Site contains the impressive remains of an ancient city dating as far back as the eighth century BC.

The Syracuse Archaeological Site (Siracusa) in Sicily contains the impressive remains of the ancient city of Syracuse dating as far back as the eighth century BC. The city of Syracuse was founded by Greek colonists - heralding from Corinth - in 734 BC. At its height, Syracuse was the most... Read More

Taormina Amphitheatre

Taormina Amphitheatre was first built by the Ancient Greeks in the third century BC and reconstructed by the Romans.

Taormina Amphitheatre (Teatro Greco Romano) was initially built by the Greeks in the third century BC before being rebuilt and enlarged by the Romans. While known as an amphitheatre, the site is actually an ancient theatre, not an arena of the type normally meant by the term. Parts of the Taormina Amphitheatre,... Read More

Taxila

Taxila was the ancient Gandhāran capital city and its incredible ruins are a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Taxila, also known as the Ancient Gandhāran city of Takshashila, is an ancient site in the Punjab Province of Pakistan dating back as far as the sixth century BC. One of the factors which make Taxila such a significant archeological site is the fact that, over its five century lifespan, it... Read More

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Temple of Aphaea - Aegina

The ancient Temple of Aphaea on the island of Aegina is one of the most important and picturesque temples in Greece.

The ancient Temple of Aphaea on the island of Aegina is one of the most important and picturesque temples in Greece. The site itself was the location of an important ancient sanctuary which dates back far into antiquity. The sanctuary was dedicated to the cult of Aphaia, a local deity later... Read More

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Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae

The Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae is often said to be one of the best examples of its kind in the Peloponnese.

The Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae, also known simply at the Temple of Bassae, is not just beautifully preserved, but is often said to be one of the best examples of its kind in the Peloponnese. Built sometimes from the middle to end of the 5th Century (estimates range... Read More

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Temple of Hephaestus

The Temple of Hephaestus is an imposing ancient Greek temple in the Athenian Agora.

The Temple of Hephaestus is an imposing ancient Greek temple in the Athenian Agora and site of worship of the Greek deity of fire, blacksmiths and sculpture. Built in the fifth century BC, the Temple of Hephaestus was later incorporated into the Church of Agios Georgios, this accounting for its excellent... Read More

Temple of Horus

The Temple of Horus is a vast and incredibly well-preserved monument to one of Ancient Egypt’s most important deities.

The Temple of Horus, also known as the Edfu Temple, is an incredibly well-preserved monument to one of Ancient Egypt’s most important deities, Horus. Worshipped as the child of Isis and Osiris, Horus was depicted with the head - and often the body - of a falcon and was the... Read More

Temple of Olympian Zeus

The Temple of Olympian Zeus is one of the most impressive ancient temples in Greece.

The Temple of Olympian Zeus, also known as the Olympeion is one of the biggest - if not actually the biggest - ancient temples in Greece. Vast and impressive, the Temple of Olympian Zeus was begun by Peisistratus the Young in the sixth century BC but various events and circumstances meant... Read More

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Temple of Poseidon - Sounio

The Temple of Poseidon of Sounio is a picturesque ruin of a fifth century BC Greek temple dedicated to the deity of the sea.

The Temple of Poseidon of Sounio is a picturesque ruin of a fifth century BC Greek temple dedicated to the deity of the sea. Dramatically perched on a cliff overlooking the ocean, the Temple of Poseidon of Sounio is now made up of a rectangle of restored large Doric columns. For... Read More

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The Acropolis Museum

The Acropolis Museum is a museum of Ancient Greece and general Athenian history.

The Acropolis Museum is a stunningly located and constructed archaeological museum housing a myriad of Ancient Greek artefacts, particularly those relating to the Acropolis and the Parthenon, both of which can be seen from the museum's top floor panoramic windows. Housed in an eminently modern building and using multimedia presentations side... Read More

The Agora Museum - Athens

The Agora Museum displays artefacts from the Ancient Agora of Athens and is housed within the reconstructed Stoa of Attalos.

The Agora Museum displays finds and artefacts from the site of the Ancient Agora of Athens. It is also located within the reconstructed ancient building of the Stoa of Attalos. Originally constructed in the mid-second century BC, the Stoa of Attalos - once a popular shopping precinct and meeting place... Read More

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The Altes Museum

The Altes Museum in Berlin contains a collection of Ancient Greek and Roman artifacts.

The Altes Museum is part of Germany’s National Museum and is located in Berlin. Displaying part of the National Museum’s collection of classical antiquities, even the building of the Altes Museum has been built in a style inspired by Ancient Greece. One of the main collections at the Altes Museum is... Read More

The Amphiareion at Oropos

The Amphiareion at Oropos was a sanctuary built in the late 5th century BC dedicated to the mythical deified seer Amphiaraos where pilgrims came from far and wide for his oracular medicinal and psychological healing.

The Amphiareion at Oropos is a ruined 5th century sanctuary in Oropos, around 30 miles north of Athens, the Greek capital city. It was built in the late 5th century BC dedicated to the mythical deified seer Amphiaraos, one of the most noble and well-respected figures in Greek mythology. Pilgrims... Read More

The Choragic Monument of Lysicrates

Lysicrates’ monument to commemorate first prize in a dramatic performance that he had sponsored around 335 BCE.

The Choragic Monument of Lysicrates was the first Greek monument built in the Corinthian order. The frieze decoration depicts the adventure of Dionysos with the pirates, whom he turned into dolphins. Lysicrates is the man who paid for the monument, which commemorates a chorus that he sponsored who won first... Read More

The Erechtheion

The Erechtheion is a well preserved ancient temple in the Acropolis complex.

The Erechtheion is a well preserved ancient temple within the Acropolis complex where its believed namesake, the legendary Greek king Erechtheus, is thought to have come to worship. Immersed in myth and legend, the Erechtheion was home to several cults, including those of Poseidon, Athena and, of course, Erechtheus himself. Completed in... Read More

The Hermitage

The Hermitage is a world renowned museum in St Petersburg which includes a vast array of global exhibits ranging from ancient artefacts and archaeological finds to modern history.

The Hermitage is a vast museum complex in St. Petersburg housing around three million historic and archaeological artefacts, paintings, sculptures, numismatics and other works. It is one of world’s most well-renowned museums, with an astonishing array of exhibits ranging from the art and culture of ancient civilisations such as the... Read More

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is a world renowned museum exhibiting works spanning eight thousand years.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is one of the most famous art museums in the world, exhibiting pieces spanning over eight thousand years of history. From prehistoric art and that of the Ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans to medieval works, Asian art and art of the Americas, the... Read More

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The Neues Museum

The Neues Museum in Berlin has a vast collection including Prehistoric, Ancient Egyptian, Roman and Greek works.

The Neues Museum in Berlin is part of Germany’s National Museum and, following a reconstruction project, is now the home of the Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection, the Collection of Classical Antiquities and the Museum of Prehistory and Early History. Within the Neues Museum’s Ancient Egyptian collection, one of its most... Read More

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The Parthenon

The Parthenon is probably the most famous surviving site from Ancient Greece and is a monument to Classical Greek civilisation.

The Parthenon is probably the most famous surviving site from Ancient Greece. Standing at the heart of The Acropolis in the centre of Athens, the Parthenon is a monument to Classical Greek civilisation. Built during the golden age of Pericles - the famous Athenian statesman - the Parthenon was originally constructed... Read More

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The Pergamon Museum

The Pergamon Museum in Berlin displays ancient exhibitions and those of Muslim art.

The Pergamon Museum is a large and varied museum in Berlin housing three different exhibitions. One of the collections at the Pergamon Museum is part of the Classical Antiquities, known as the Antikensammlung. This collection includes mostly Greek and some Roman pieces ranging from jewellery to sarcophagi, sculptures and even remains... Read More

The Propylaia

The Propylaia was the grand entranceway to the Acropolis.

The Propylaia (also spelt Propylaea) was the grand entranceway to the Acropolis. Begun in approximately 437BC under the supervision of the architect Mnesikles, works on the Propylaia continued until 432BC, but were never completed. Nevertheless, even in its unfinished state, the Propylaia is considered to be of great architectural importance and... Read More

The Serapeum

The Serapeum was a magnificent ancient temple and library complex in Alexandria of which little remains today.

The Serapeum in Alexandria was an ancient temple dedicated to the worship of the Greco-Egyptian deity Serapis. Built by Ptolemy III in the third century BC, the Serapeum also housed an important library which may have served as an annex of the Great Library of Alexandria. In late... Read More

Theatre of Dionysus

The Theatre of Dionysus was one of the most important theatres in Ancient Greece.

The Theatre of Dionysus in Athens was one of the most important theatres in Ancient Greece. Initially built of timber in the sixth century BC, the Theatre of Dionysus was named in honour of the Greek deity of wine and theatre. It soon became a focal point of Ancient Greek social... Read More

Thebes

Thebes was an ancient Mycenaean and Greek city eventually destroyed by Alexander the Great.

Thebes was a powerful city in Ancient Greece, the few remains of which can now be seen in the modern Greek town of Thiva. Whilst first occupied in Neolithic times and already thriving in the Helladic period, Thebes reached its peak during the Mycenaean period. The settlement continued to thrive, becoming... Read More

Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum

Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum focuses on ancient Macedonia via five comprehensive exhibits.

Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum takes visitors through the history of Ancient Macedonia, exploring the lives of its citizens, their ideology and their culture from Neolithic times through to the Mycenaean period and the Roman period. Exhibiting artefacts ranging from daily tools to burial pieces and ideological paraphernalia to gold, the Thessaloniki Archaeological... Read More

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Tombs of the Kings - Paphos

The Tombs of the Kings is a Hellenistic necropolis in Paphos in Cyprus containing a series of eight well-preserved tombs.

The Tombs of the Kings is a Hellenistic necropolis in Paphos in Cyprus containing a series of eight well-preserved tombs. Given that the Tombs of the Kings is a third century BC site and the monarchy was abolished in 312 BC, the name is somewhat of a misnomer, but this... Read More

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Trogir

Trogir is a small island town just to the west of Split renowned for its fortified walls and stunning Romanesque, Renaissance and Baroque architecture. It appears in Game of Thrones as Qarth, 'the greatest city that ever was or will be'.

Seventeen miles west of Split on the Adriatic Coast lay the historic Croatian harbour town of Trogir, renowned for its fortified walls and stunning Romanesque, Renaissance and Baroque architecture. Trogir was founded by Greeks in the third century BC as Tragurion (‘tragos’ is Greek for ‘male goat’) and boasts 2,300 years... Read More

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Umm Qais

Umm Qais, also spelt Umm Qays, houses the remains of Gadara, one of the Decapolis cities.

Present day Umm Qais has within it the remains of one of the ancient Decapolis cities, the Greco-Roman settlement of Gadara. Probably established by the Greeks in the 4th century BC, Gadara was taken by the Seleucids and, in 63BC, by the Romans led by Pompey. It would later fall... Read More

Underground Library of Alexandria

The underground library of Alexandria once formed part of the city’s famous Great Library and can be found under the ruins of the Serapeum.

The underground library of Alexandria, found underneath the ruins of the Serapeum, consists of a series of subterranean tunnels and storerooms where it is believed part of the collection of the Great Library of Alexandria was stored. The Great Library itself was constructed in the third century BC and was... Read More

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Velia Archaeological Site

The Velia Archaeological Site contains Greek, Roman and medieval ruins of the city initially founded as Elea.

The Velia Archaeological Site (Scavi di Velia) in Campania houses the remains of a Greek colony turned Roman municipality. Velia was originally founded by a Greek community as the colony of “Elea” in 540 BC. With the help of prominent citizens and philosophers Zeno and Parmenides (the latter having founded... Read More

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Vergina Museum

The Royal Tombs of Vergina Museum is a fascinating underground vault containing the tomb of Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great.

The Vergina Museum in northern Greece contains some of the most astonishing ancient tomb discoveries in history – namely tombs said to be of Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great, and Alexander IV, the conqueror’s son. The tombs were discovered by Greek archaeologist Manolis Andronikos in 1977 and,... Read More

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Zeugma

The remains of this important Roman city are under excavation in Turkey. Though not open to the public, many finds from the site can be seen in the Gaziantep Zeugma Mosaic Museum.

Zeugma was one of the most important cities of the Roman Empire in the East. Originally founded around 300 BC by one of Alexander’s successors, his general Seleucus Nicator, the city was a vital trading point across the Euphrates River. The military and commercial importance of Zeugma led to major growth... Read More