American Revolution Sites

If you’re looking to explore American Revolution sites and want to find the best places to view  American Revolution history then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

The American Revolution, or Revolutionary War saw the birth of the American nation. Disillusioned with their limited representation within the British parliament, many colonials believed that they would never achieve true equality within the existing system - the result was the American Revolution and the eventual overthrow of British rule.

A number of American Revolution historical sites still exist today, paying tribute to the momentous events that led to the break from Britain. These sites range from the most key engagements of the war to the silent graveyards that hold some of the most prominent figures of the time.

There’s a great selection of American Revolution sites and you can plan some fantastic things to see on your trips. Once you’ve explored the list of American Revolution sites and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring American Revolution sites.

Our database of historic places is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other American Revolution sites, remains or ruins, you can always add them to Trip Historic now by visiting our Explore page.

You can explore the American Revolution sites by clicking on the links below:

American Revolution: Site Index

Bacon’s Castle

Built in 1665, remains British North America's oldest, extent brick dwelling and finest example of Jacobean architecture.

Located in Surry, Virginia, Bacon’s Castle was built in 1665, the home of plantation owner Arthur Allen. Yet the name Bacon’s Castle refers not to its original master but to the anti-colonial uprising known as Bacon's Rebellion which banished Allen’s son and heir from the house in 1676. Today, Bacon’s Castle... Read More

Photo by Elliott Brown (cc)

Benjamin Franklin House

Benjamin Franklin House in London is the only surviving former residence of Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

Benjamin Franklin House in London is the only surviving former residence of Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. A terraced Georgian house located close to Trafalgar Square, today the site operates as a museum and examines the time Franklin spent in London as well as his... Read More

Photo by Allie_Caulfield (cc)

Bunker Hill Monument

The Bunker Hill Monument commemorates the first major battle of the American Revolution in 1775 and is one of the most important American Revolution historical sites.

The Bunker Hill Monument is a memorial of the Battle of Bunker Hill, which took place on 17 June 1775 between the British army and the militias of Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island early in the American Revolution. The British army was far more well equipped and well trained... Read More

Photo by Library of Congress (cc)

Cliveden House

Cliveden House is an eighteenth century historic home in Philadelphia and the site of a Revolutionary War battle.

Cliveden House is an eighteenth century historic home in Northwest Philadelphia’s Germantown neighbourhood. Built from 1763 to 1767, Cliveden House was intended as the summer home of Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Chew and his family. In fact, it would go on to fulfil this role for seven generations of Chews,... Read More

Photo by boboroshi (cc)

Colonial National Park

English Colonial America started and ended in the area now known as Colonial National Park.

Colonial National Park encompasses the areas in which the English established their first permanent American colony in 1607 and the battlefield on which they surrendered to George Washington’s army in 1781, thus ending their rule. Incorporating Historic Jamestowne and Yorktown Battlefield, together with the Cape Henry Memorial commemorating the location of... Read More

Photo by Tony the Misfit (cc)

Faneuil Hall

Faneuil Hall, known as the Cradle of Liberty, was the scene of protests leading up to the American War of Independence.

Faneuil Hall in Boston was constructed in 1742 by wealthy merchant, Peter Faneuil and although it burnt down in 1761, was rebuilt the next year. Faneuil intended the brick building to be a centre of commerce, a function which it still fulfils today. However, it was during the eighteenth century that... Read More

Fort Hamilton

Fort Hamilton is a Third System Fort, a US military base and home to the Harbor Defense Museum.

Fort Hamilton is a US military base in New York built between 1825 and 1831 as part of the city’s Third System defences. The Third System forts were coastal defences built in the US following the War of 1812. Even before its construction, the site on which Fort Hamilton was built... Read More

Photo by luisvilla (cc)

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern is a museum of colonial, revolutionary and early Republic US history.

Fraunces Tavern is famous for being the site where (then General) George Washington delivered a farewell speech to the Continental Army after the British had left New York in the American Revolution. Built as the home of an affluent merchant in 1719, Frances Tavern was turned into a working tavern in... Read More

Photo by Directory of Boston (cc)

Granary Burial Ground

Granary Burial Ground is a graveyard founded in the 17th century and where many famous Americans are buried.

Granary Burial Ground is a graveyard in Boston founded in 1660 and is the final resting place of many important figures from the American Revolution. While Granary Burial Ground contains around 2,345 tombs and graves, the actual number of people buried here is estimated to be approximately 5,000, due to the... Read More

Photo by sarahstierch (cc)

Historic Jamestowne

Historic Jamestowne was the location of the first successful English colony in America in 1607.

It was in Historic Jamestowne in 1607 that the English established their first successful colony in America. Previous attempts, notably that of Roanoke in 1587, had been made, but the colony the English formed in Historic Jamestowne was the root of what was to eventually become America. Due to its strategic... Read More

Photo by amandabhslater (cc)

HMS Victory

HMS Victory was Vice Admiral Lord Nelson’s flagship during the Battle of Trafalgar and the site where this heroic figure died.

HMS Victory is one of the world’s oldest and most famous warships. No other surviving ship has served in the American Revolution, the French Revolutionary War and the Napoleonic Wars. In fact, it was her role as the flagship of British hero Vice Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson during his final... Read More

Photo by techfun (cc)

Independence Hall - Philadelphia

Independence Hall is the site where the The Declaration of Independence (1776) and the Constitution of the United States (1787) were both signed.

Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is one of the most important landmarks in US history, being the site where the nation declared independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain on 4 July 1776 by signing the Declaration of Independence. Completed in 1753, Independence Hall served as Philadelphia’s State House and the... Read More

Photo by lindseywb (cc)

Independence National Historical Park

Independence Hall is the site where the The Declaration of Independence (1776) and the Constitution of the United States (1787) were both signed.

Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is home to a plethora of significant national landmarks in the US. From Independence Hall which was the site where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed and Congress Hall, seat of Congress from 1790 to 1800, to the home of Benjamin Franklin,... Read More

Photo by redjar (cc)

Minute Man National Historical Park

Minute Man National Historical Park is the home of the first battle of the American Revolution.

Minute Man National Historical Park in Massachusetts, USA commemorates the start of the American Revolution. The American Revolution began as a protest against the treatment of the Americans as British subjects and turned into an eight year war for American independence. Minute Man National Park includes the Battle Road Trail, the... Read More

Old North Church - Boston

Old North Church played a vital role in igniting the American Revolution and is part of the Freedom Trail.

Old North Church is Boston’s oldest church, having been built in 1723 in the Georgian style. Originally called Christ’s Church, Old North Church was also the tallest building in Boston at the time and thus came to serve an important role in the American Revolution. In the eighteenth century, the British... Read More

Old South Meeting House - Boston

Old South Meeting House was an important 18th century meeting place and the site where the Boston Tea Party began.

Old South Meeting House started life in 1729, when it was built as a Puritan house of worship, with a congregation in which leaders such as Samuel Adams and Benjamin Franklin mingled with artists like the famous African American poet Phillis Wheatley. A Forum for Dissent As tensions grew about the... Read More

Old State House - Boston

The Old State House in Boston played an important role in the American Revolution and was where the Declaration of Independence was proclaimed.

The Old State House in Boston played an important role in the American Revolution and is now one of the sites included in the Freedom Trail, a tourist trail made up of sixteen sites relating to the American Revolution against the British. Construction The Old State House was originally completed in 1713... Read More

Paul Revere House

Paul Revere House was the Boston home of Paul Revere, a silversmith who played a vital role in the American Revolution.

Paul Revere House was the home of goldsmith/silversmith Paul Revere and his family from 1770 to 1800. In 1774 and 1775, during the build up to the American Revolution, Paul Revere was tasked as an express rider on behalf of the Massachusetts Committee of Safety and the Boston Committee... Read More

The Freedom Trail

The Freedom Trail is a tour through Boston’s historical sites relating to the American Revolution.

The Freedom Trail takes visitors to Boston through a tour of sixteen sites in the city which were of importance before and during the American Revolution against British rule in the 18th century. Boston played a central role in igniting the American Revolution, also known as the American War of... Read More

Photo by By cliff1066™ (cc)

Yorktown Battlefield

Yorktown Battlefield is the site of the final major battle of the American Revolution.

Yorktown battlefield in Virginia is the location of the final battle of the American Revolution. It was at Yorktown battlefield that, on 19 October 1781, the British surrendered to the combined forces of the French and American armies, under the command of General Washington. This dramatic action marked the end of the... Read More